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Program and Abstract of the 26th International Laser Radar ...

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26th International »aser Radar Conference
Program and Abstracts


25-29 June 2012
Porto Heli, Greece














Editors
Alexandros Papayannis, Dimitrios Balis and Vassilis Amiridis


















Edited by:

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Alexandros Papayannis
Laser Remote Sensing Unit (LRSU)
Physics Department
National Technical University of Athens (NTUA)
15780 Zografou, Greece
Email:  HYPERLINK "mailto:apdlidar@central.ntua.gr" apdlidar@central.ntua.gr Assoc. Prof. Dr. Dimitrios Balis Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics (LAP) Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH) 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece Email:  HYPERLINK "mailto:balis@auth.gr" balis@auth.gr
Dr. Vassilis Amiridis
Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry Group (APCG)
National Observatory of Athens (NOA)
15236 Palaia Penteli, Greece
Email:  HYPERLINK "mailto:vamoir@noa.gr" vamoir@noa.gr

Copyright: © ICLAS
Published in the Netherlands by the European Space Agency (ESA-ESTEC) on behalf of the ICLAS (International Co-ordination group for Laser Atmospheric Studies) for the 26th International Laser Radar Conference, 25-29 June 2012, Porto Heli, Greece.

Preface

Dear Participants of the 26th International Laser Radar Conference,

On behalf of the Conference Organizing Committee, we would like to welcome you to the beautiful site of Porto Heli, Peloponnesus, Greece for the works of the 26th ILRC on June 25-29, 2012. For 44 years now, the International Laser Radar Conference (ILRC) traditionally remains the world recognized venue where scientists and engineers from all over the world working in the field of the optical remote sensing applied to the atmospheres of earth and other planets and the oceans, meet together to report on new results and developments and obtain a comprehensive and state-of-the-art knowledge at a vast range of topics (technology, devices, applications, education) associated with the laser radar (lidar) technique. The ILRC remains an enjoyable and stimulating meeting at which the international lidar community can get together to discuss and even argue over controversial topics and future directions. A primary focus of the Conference is to encourage young scientists to attend and present work, ensuring the vitality of the field of laser remote sensing.

Recent ILRC Conferences reported on an increased research activity in areas such as space-based lidars, advances in lidar components and techniques, co-analysis of data from ground-based and airborne/space-borne lidars coupled with other data from ground or airborne/space-borne sensors, studies of the atmospheric dynamics and structure, middle and upper atmosphere physics and chemistry, measurements of atmospheric parameters (density, temperature, humidity, winds, turbulence etc.), measurements and characterization of climate-change and air pollution related aerosols, clouds and trace gases, and finally on the spread of lidar network activities and assimilation of observations into forecast models. We believe that ILRC, in addition to serving its traditional role as a venue for presentation of recent results, should actively address the state and future of laser remote sensing. Consequently we developed a program that makes use of invited talks and conference themes to describe current and future needs for atmospheric, earth and ocean measurements, present emerging technologies and platforms that promise to increase the impact and application of laser remote sensing, discuss the deployment of lidars, as part of multi-dimensional, multi-sensor observation networks and show examples and ideas on the analysis and assimilation into models of multi-parameter, geographically extensive data sets. Additionally, specific issues such as the lidar applications in Climate Change, as well as historical building restorations and lidar educational activities were presented.

The Conference is held biennially under the auspices of the International Coordination-group for Laser Atmospheric Studies (ICLAS - International Coordination group for Laser Atmospheric Studies) and of the International Radiation Commission (IRC). We recognize that this Conference would not have been taken place without our supporters: the National Technical University of Athens, the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, the National Observatory of Athens, the Mariolopoulos-Kanaginis Foundation for Environmental Sciences, the Academy of Athens, as well as the European Space Agency (ESA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science/Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Laser Radar Society of Japan. Additional funding was provided by Coherent Investments LLC, Raymetrics S.A., Licel GmbH, InnoLas Laser GmbH, Quantel S.A., Leosphere S.A., CIMEL Electronique and Optronics S.A. The newspaper “H Kathimerini” was our media partner.

The editors would like to thank all the Conference Committees for their enthusiastic, careful and punctual work. Special thanks go to all authors of this event who have contributed with their recent works, to which we wish a pleasant and fruitful stay at Porto Heli, Greece.

The Editors: Alexandros Papayannis, Dimitrios Balis and Vassilis Amiridis.



ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
Alexandros Papayannis, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
Dimitrios Balis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Vassilis Amiridis, National Observatory of Athens, Greece
Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri, Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus and National Technical University of Athens, Greece
Elina Giannakaki, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece and Finnish Meteorological Institute, Finland
Georgios Tsaknakis, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
Panos Kokkalis, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
Alexandra Tsekeri, National Observatory of Athens, Greece
Eleni Marinou, National Observatory of Athens, Greece
TRAVEL GRANT AWARD COMMITTEE
Dimitrios Balis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Upendra Singh, NASA Langley Research Centre, USA
Thomas McGee, NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, USA
Milton Huffaker, Coherent Technologies, USA
Yingjian Wang, Chinese Academy of Science, China
Ulla Wandiger, Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Germany
Doina Nicolae, National Institute of R&D for Optoelectronics, Romania
Eduardo Landulfo, Centro de Lasers e Aplicações, Brazil
Adolfo Comerón, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain
Topics addressed during this Conference:
Advances in lidar techniques and new methodologies
Atmospheric winds and turbulence
Atmospheric boundary layer and meteorology
Tropospheric and lower stratospheric dynamics and transport
Middle atmosphere physics and chemistry
Solid Earth, Ocean, Land surface and other applications
Space-based missions, validation and global monitoring
Combining lidar measurements and analysis with other techniques
Water vapor-temperature-trace gases and air quality
Lidar networks and assimilation of observations into forecast models
Aerosol characterization – Cloud microphysics – Radiative properties and Global Change
Applications of lidars in historical building restorations and lidar educational activities



PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Co-Chairs: Alexandros Papayannis, Dimitrios Balis, Vassilis Amiridis
Session 1: Lidar Technologies and Methods
Arnoud Apituley, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, Netherlands
Dimitrios Balis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Anatolii Chaikovsky, B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, Belarus
Pierre Flamant, École Polytechnique-Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, France
Volker Freudenthaler, University of Munich, Germany
Wei Heli, Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, China
Robert Menzies, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, USA
*Geary Schwemmer, Science and Engineering Services, Inc., USA
Frank Wagner, Evora University, Portugal
*Yingjiang Wang, Hefei IPS, KLAC and OR, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
Christos Zerefos, Academy of Athens, Greece

Session 2: Networking - Forecast Models
*Juan Carlos Antuña, Institute of Meteorology, Camagey, Cuba
*Paolo Di Girolamo, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Italy
Raymond Hoff, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA
Gelsomina Pappalardo, CNR-IMAA, Italy
Nobuo Sugimoto, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan

Session 3: Aerosol characterization-Clouds-Radiative properties
Vassilis Amiridis, National Observatory of Athens, Greece
Albert Ansmann, Institute for Tropospheric Research, Germany
Adolfo Comerón, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain
Detlef Müller, NASA Langley Research Center, USA, and GIST, Korea, and IfT, Germany
Doina Nicolae, National Institute of Research and Development for Optoelectronics, Romania
Joe Shaw, Montana State University, USA
Igor Veselovskii, Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russia
Ulla Wandinger, Institute for Tropospheric Research, Germany
David Whiteman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA

Session 4: Space Missions
Olivier LeRille, ESA-ESTEC, Netherlands
Pat McCormick, Hampton University, USA
Georgios Tzeremes, ESA-ESTEC, Netherlands
Itsushi Uno, Kyushu University, Japan
David Winker, NASA Langley Research Center, USA
Stuart Young, CSIRO MAR, Australia

Session 5: Atmospheric Winds-Turbulence
Andreas Behrendt, University of Hohenheim, Germany
Rod Frehlich, CIRES, University of Colorado, USA
Bruce Gentry, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA
Mike Hardesty, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, USA
Grady J. Koch, NASA Langley, USA

*Kohei Mizutani, Communications Research Laboratory, Japan
*Toshiyuki Murayama, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Japan
Oliver Reitebuch, German Aerospace Center, Germany
*Upendra Singh, NASA Langley Research Center, USA

Session 6: Other Lidar Applications (Earth-Ocean-Land-Restoration-Education)
Giovanna Cecchi, CNR, Italy
*Gennadii Matvienko, Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, Russia
Gilles Roy, Defence Research Establishment Valcartier, Canada
Sune Svanberg, Lund University, Sweden

Session 7: Water Vapor-Temperature-Trace Gases-Air Quality
Andreas Fix, German Aerospace Center, Germany
Samuel Harvey Melfi, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA
*Alex Papayannis, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
*Christoph Senff, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, USA
Ilya Serikof, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Germany
Thomas Trickl, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology-IFU, Germany

Session 8: Boundary Layer-Meteorology
Edwin Eloranta, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
Cyrille Flamant, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, France
Eduardo Landulfo, Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Brazil
Jacques Pelon, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, France
Valentin Simeonov, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Switzerland

Session 9: Lower/Middle/Upper Atmosphere-Physics-Chemistry-Transport
Xinzhao Chu, University of Colorado Boulder, USA
Sophie Godin, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, France
Stuart McDermid, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, CA
*Thomas McGee, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA
*Philippe Keckhut, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Université de Versailles, France
Chikao Nagasawa, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan
Takuji Nakamura, Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Japan
Eduardo J. Quel, CEILAP, Alo Villa Martelli, Argentina
Scott Spuler, National Center for Atmospheric Research, USA
Geraint Vaughan, University of Manchester, UK

* Members of ICLAS for the year 2012.
77KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Sune Svanberg (Lund Laser Centre and Lund University, Lund, Sweden)


Sune Svanberg made his PhD in 1972 at Göteborg University, Sweden, with a Thesis on Optical Resonance Spectroscopy. After a post-doc year at Columbia University, New York and initial work on atomic laser spectroscopy he continued laser-based spectroscopy in Göteborg up till 1980, when he became professor and head of the Atomic Physics Division at Lund Institute of Technology, up till 2008. In Lund a vigorous program of laser spectroscopy, including basic atomic physics and applications to energy, environmental and medical research has been pursued. Basic studies include studies of radiative properties of atoms and ions as well as super intense laser/matter interactions (high harmonics generation, X-ray laser pumping and broadband X-ray generation). Applications include laser radar sounding of pollutants in the atmosphere and hydrosphere, laser diagnostics of combustion processes, and laser-based detection and treatment of cancer and cardio-vascular disease. In particular, laser radar research, initiated already in Göteborg, has now been pursued for almost 40 years. Among his 600 research papers about 180 are on environmental monitoring. In 1995 he was appointed director of the newly established Lund Laser Centre, which also gained the EC status of a European Large Scale Facility. He remained its director till 2010, and continues as Senior Professor and coordinator for the largest grant at the centre. Since 2011 he is also a part-time distinguished professor at the South China Normal University, Guangzhou, focusing on environmental monitoring and now building up a large Chinese mobile lidar system. He received around 20 international and national awards (including 5 gold medals) in addition to 4 honorary doctor degrees, 4 honorary professorships, and 3 fellowships. He is a member of 6 scientific Academies, including the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences. He was a member or chairman of more than 20 International Research Evaluation Committees or Scientific Advisory Boards. He served 10 years on the Nobel Committee for Physics, 2 years as its chairman.


Donald J. Wuebbles (University of Illinois, Illinois, USA)


Donald J. Wuebbles is the Harry E. Preble Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Illinois. He is a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences as well as an affiliate professor in the Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering and in Electrical and Computer Engineering. He was the first Director of the School of Earth, Society, and Environment at Illinois, and was Head of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences for many years. Dr. Wuebbles is an expert in numerical modeling of atmospheric physics and chemistry. He has authored over 400 scientific articles, relating mostly to atmospheric chemistry and climate issues. He has been a lead author on a number of national and international assessments related to concerns about climate change. He has also been a lead author on national and international assessments relating to atmospheric chemistry and the effects of human activities on stratospheric and tropospheric ozone. Dr. Wuebbles and colleagues received the 2005 Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He has been honored by being selected a Fellow of three major professional science societies, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Meteorological Society. He shares in the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for his work with the international Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He was a member of a federal advisory committee that assessed and in 2009 published a report on the potential impacts of climate change on the United States. Professor Wuebbles is a Coordinating Lead Author for the next major international IPCC assessment of climate change and is a leader in the next U.S. National Climate Assessment, being a member of the Executive Committee and the Federal Advisory Committee.

26th ILRC
Conference Program
25-29 June 2012


DAY-1 Monday 25 June 2012
08:00 – 13:00REGISTRATION08:30 – 18:20ORAL PRESENTATIONS
08:30-09:00
Welcome & ICLAS Anouncements
09:00-09:30Keynote Speaker: Sune Svanberg
Laser Remote Sensing:
from Environmental to Medical Applications
SESSION 1O : Lidar Technologies and MethodsCo-Chairs: Alexandros Papayannis, Pierre Flamant
S1O-01
09:30-10:00

Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development at NASA Langley Research Center for NASA Space-based 3-D Winds Mission (INVITED)
Upendra N. Singh, Michael J. Kavaya, Jirong Yu, Mulugeta Petros, and Grady J. Koch
S1O-02
10:00-10:152-MICRON LASERS FOR CO2 AND WIND MEASUREMENTS
Kohei Mizutani, Shoken Ishii, Motoaki Yasui, Toshikazu Itabe, Atsushi Sato, Kazuhiro Asai, Hirotake Fukuoka, Takashi Katai, Takayoshi Ishikawa, Teiji Kase
S1O-03
10:15-10:302-MICRON HIGH-REPETITION RATE LASER TRANSMITTER FOR CO2 AND WIND LIDAR (COWI)
Dimitri Edouart, Fabien Gibert, Florian Le Mounier, Claire Cénac, Pierre Flamant
10:30-11:00COFFEE BREAKCo-Chairs: Robert Menzies, Geary Schwemmer
S1O-04
11:00-11:30
MERLIN: a French-German mission addressing methane monitoring by lidar from space (INVITED)
Pierre Flamant, Gerhard Ehret, Bruno Millet, Matthias Alpers
S1O-05
11:30-11:45A DIRECT DETECTION 1.6 ¼M DIAL WITH THREE WAVELENGTHS FOR HIGH ACCURATE MEASUREMENTS OF VERTICAL CO2 PROFILES IN THE TROPOSPHERE
Chikao Nagasawa, Makoto Abo, Yasukuni Shibata, Tomohiro Nagai, Tetsu Sakai, Makoto Tsukamoto
S1O-06
11:45-12:00DEVELOPMENT OF RAMAN LIDAR FOR WATER DISSOLVED CO2 DETECTION
Toshihito Somekawa, Masayuki Fujita
S1O-07
12:00-12:15Evaluation of an obscurant-penetrating 3D-imaging lidar in whiteout conditions
Simon Roy, Xiaoying Cao, Gilles Roy, Evan Trickey
S1O-08
12:15-12:30Data Analysis of 3-Dimensional Water Vapor Fields Measured with the UHOH DIAL System
Florian Späth, Andreas Behrendt, Volker Wulfmeyer

S1O-09
12:30-12:45Polarization Configuration of the GV-HSRL for detection of horizontally oriented ice crystals
Matthew M. Hayman, Scott Spuler, Bruce Morely, Joseph VanAndel
S1O-10
12:45-13:00FRAUNHOFER LIDAR IN THE GREEN BAND FOR DAYTIME PHOTON COUNTING
Songhua Wu, Shengguang Qin, Xiaoquan Song, Bingyi Liu, Wei Zhang, Lei Jin, Huaming Hou
13:00-14:00LUNCH BREAKCo-Chairs: Gelsomina Pappalardo, Arnoud Apituley
S1O-11
14:00-14:15
Comparison of High-Spectral-Resolution Lidar with Raman Lidar
Dietrich Althausen, Peter Oelsner, Axel Rohmer, Holger Baars
S1O-12
14:15-14:30VERTICAL VERSUS SCANNING LIDAR MEASUREMENTS IN HORIZONTAL HOMOGENEOUS ATMOSPHERE
Mariana Adam
S1O-13
14:30-14:45Atmospheric temperature measurement by spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering for airborne applications
Hamza Alami, Patrick Feneyrou, Grégoire Pillet
S1O-14
14:45-15:00AN INSTRUMENT FOR ACCURATE MEASUREMENT OF RAYLEIGH-BRILLOUIN SCATTERING PROFILES AROUND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS
Ziyu Gu, Maria Ofelia Vieitez, Eric-Jan van Duijn, Wim Ubachs
S1O-15
15:00-15:15UV RAMAN LIDAR AND SIDE SCATTERING DETECTOR FOR THE MONITORING OF AEROSOL OPTICAL TRANSMISSION AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY
Vincenzo Rizi, Pierre Auger Collaboration Pierre Auger Collaboration, Adam Botts, Clint Allen, Michael Calhoun, Bryce Carande, Michael Coco, John Claus, Lucas Emmert, Levi Hamilton, T.J. Heid, Fabian Honecker, Marco Iarlori, Sarah Morgan, Shay Robinson, David Starbuck, John Sherman, Michael Wakin, Orlen Wolf
S1O-16
15:15-15:30ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LIDAR SENSITIVITY AND TENDENCIES OF GEOPHYSICAL TIME SERIES
Jens Fiedler, Gerd Baumgarten
S1O-17
15:30-15:45ARLEM: A MONTE-CARLO-BASED RETRIEVAL ALGORITHM FOR WIDE FOV LIDAR SYSTEMS
Robert Buras, Josef Gasteiger
S1O-18
15:45-16:00Meteoritic Smoke in the Upper Stratopshere: Implications for Backscatter Lidar Inferred From Lidar Observations and Global Aerosol Microphysical Modeling
Ryan Reynolds Neely III, Jeffrey P. Thayer, R. Michael Hardesty, Owen B. Toon, Susan Solomon








16:00-16:20COFFEE BREAKSESSION 2O : Networking - Forecast Models Technologies Co-Chairs: Raymond Hoff, Frank Wanger
S2O-01
16:20-16:50
Integrated Aerosol Observing System (INVITED)
Gelsomina Pappalardo
S2O-02
16:50-17:05LIDAR COMMUNITY IN LATIN AMERICA: A DECADE OF CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES
Juan Carlos Antuna, Eduardo Landulfo, Barclay Clemesha, Francesco Zaratti, Eduardo Quel, Alvaro Bastidas, Rene Estevan, Boris Barja
S2O-03
17:05-17:20STANDARDIZATION OF THE DEFINITIONS OF VERTICAL RESOLUTION AND UNCERTAINTY IN THE NDACC-ARCHIVED OZONE AND TEMPERATURE LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Thierry Leblanc, Sophie Godin-Beekmann, Guillaume Payen, Franck Gabarrot, Anne van Gijsel, Justin Bandoro, Robert Sica, Thomas Trickl
S2O-04
17:20-17:35EARLINET SINGLE CALCULUS CHAIN FOR AUTOMATIC LIDAR DATA PROCESSING: FIRST TESTS ON OPTICAL PRODUCTS
Giuseppe D'Amico, Ioannis Binietoglou, Aldo Amodeo, Gelsomina Pappalardo, Holger Baars, Ronny Engelmann, Ulla Wandinger, Ina Mattis, Volker Freudenthaler, Matthias Wiegner, Doina Nicolae, Anatoli Chaikovsky, Arnoud Apituley, Mariana Adams
S2O-05
17:35-18:00ASSIMILATION OF LIDAR OBSERVATIONS IN AEROSOL TRANSPORT MODELS (INVITED)
Nobuo Sugimoto
S2O-06
18:00-18:15Aerosol Lidar Profiling and Data Assimilation for Operational Global Mass Transport Modeling and Visibility Forecasting
James R. Campbell, Jianglong Zhang, Jeffrey S. Reid, Douglas L. Westphal, Walter R. Sessions, Angela Benedetti, Ellsworth J. Welton
S2O-07
18:15-18:30LIDAR OBSERVATION AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A SUMMER DUST STORM AND ITS ARC CLOUDS IN THE TAKLIMAKAN DESERT
Kenji Kai, Hiroyuki Iwanaga, Yoshitaka Jin, Hongfei Zhou
18:30 – 20:00POSTER PRESENTATIONSSESSION 1P : Lidar Technologies and MethodsCo-Chairs: Gennadii Matvienko, Volker Freudenthaler, Yingjiang Wang, Wei Heli
S1P-01
COMPACT MULTISPECTRAL SCATTERING PARTICLE ANALYZER (COMSPA) -DEVELOPMENT OF A SCATTER SENSOR FOR LIDAR CALIBRATION
Zuguang Guan, Michael Gausa, Sandra Blindheim, Arild Danielsen
S1P-02POLARIZATION EFFECTS INDUCED BY A TWO-MIRROR LIDAR BEAM STEERING UNIT
Scott Alexander Gimbal, Qiaochu Li, Anna Petrova-Mayor
S1P-03ON DISTORTION IN THE CHM15K CEILOMETER SIGNALS
Michal Piadlowski and Iwona S. Stachlewska


S1P-04A MORPHOLOGICAL FILTER FOR AIRBORNE LIDAR DATA CONSTRAINED BY MULTI-GRADIENT
Yong Li
S1P-05OPTICAL STUDY OF THE THERMAL LENSING ON ND:YAG CRYSTALS LAB
Kosmas Gazeas, Georgios Tzeremes, Errico Armadillo
S1P-06FREQUENCY CHARACTERIZATION METHOD OF A BETA MODEL PULSED LASER TO BE USED AS SEEDER IN A HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR
Ioannis Manthos, Emmanouel Fokitis, Stavros Maltezos, Nikos Maragos, Prodromos Fetfatzis, Agelika Georgakopoulou, Violeta Gika
S1P-07INTERFEROMETER CAVITY LENGTH CONTROLLER FOR SEEDED Q-SWITCHED LASER
Martin E. Lawson, Edwin W. Eloranta
S1P-08A NOVEL LOWER ATMOSPHERE RECEIVER SYSTEM (LARS) FOR RESONANCE-FLUORESCENCE LIDARS
John Anthony Smith, Xinzhao Chu
S1P-09RESEARCH ON KEY TECHNOLOGIES OF MEMS SCANNING LARGE APERTURE FIBER-COUPLED INFRARED LASER HETERODYNE INTERFEROMETER SYSTEM
Gao Long, Zheng Yongchao, Tao Yuliang, Wang Aoyou
S1P-10FAST AND STABLE ONLINE-OFFLINE SWITCH OF THE UHOH WATER VAPOR DIAL
Florian Späth, Simon Metzendorf, Andreas Behrendt, Volker Wulfmeyer
S1P-11HIGH-POWER LASER TRANSMITTER OF THE UHOH WATER VAPOR DIAL
Simon Metzendorf, Andreas Behrendt, Florian Späth, Volker Wulfmeyer
S1P-12TRANSMITTER-RECEIVER UNIT OF THE UHOH WATER VAPOR DIAL WITH A SCANNING 800-mm TELESCOPE MIRROR
Andrea Riede, Andreas Behrendt, Volker Wulfmeyer, Dietrich Althausen, Ulla Wandinger, Volker Klein, Alexander Meister, Max Schiller
S1P-13HIGH ENERGY MOPA AT 1.55 µM REGION FOR LIDAR APPLICATIONS WITH A DOUBLE-PASS-ASSISTED Q-SWITCHED FIBER LASER AND A SINGLE-STAGE PM EDFA
Giorgos Avdikos, Paraskevas Bakopoulos, Hercules Avramopoulos
S1P-14UTILIZATION OF A FIELD LENS TO IMPROVE THE OVERLAP FUNCTION IN LIDAR SYSTEMS USING OPTICAL FIBERS
Adolfo Comerón, Michaël Sicard, Dhiraj Kumar, Francesc Rocadenbosch, Diego Lange
S1P-15A PROPOSAL OF SIMPLE RESONANCE SCATTERING LIDAR USING AN ALKALI METAL VAPOR LASER
Makoto Abo, Chikao Nagasawa, Yasukuni Shibata
S1P-16ADVANCES OF THE MULTIANGLE LIDAR FOR CTA OBSERVATORY AT CEILAP
Juan Vicente Pallotta, Pablo Ristori, Lidia Otero, Francisco Gonzalez, Juan Carlos Dworniczak, Raul D'Elia, Ezequiel Pawelko, Fernando Chouza, Alberto Etchegoyen, Eduardo Quel




S1P-17

LED MINI-LIDAR
Tatsuo Shiina
S1P-18SIMULATION STUDIES OF THE BACKSCATTERING SIGNAL IN HSRL
TECHNIQUE
Angelika Georgakopoulou
S1P-19DEVELOPMENT OF TWO-WAVELENGTH HIGH-SPECTRAL-RESOLUTION LIDAR AND APPLICATION TO SHIPBORNE MEASUREMENTS
Tomoaki Nishizawa, Nobuo Sugimoto, Ichiro Matsui, Toshiaki Takano
S1P-20VERY HIGH-RESOLUTION NA DOPPLER LIDAR AT BOULDER, COLORADO
John Anthony Smith, Weichun Fong, Brendan Roberts, Wentao Huang, Xinzhao Chu
S1P-21
CIAO: THE CNR-IMAA ADVANCED OBSERVATORY FOR ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH
Gelsomina Pappalardo, Aldo Amodeo, Ioannis Binietoglou, Antonella Boselli, Giuseppe D’Amico, Aldo Giunta, Fabio Madonna, Lucia Mona, Nikolaos Papagiannopoulos, Marco Rosoldi
S1P-22MOBILE HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR
Ilya Razenkov, Edwin W Eloranta, Martin Lawson, Joseph P Garcia
S1P-23THE CLOUD, AEROSOL BACKSCATTER AND POLARIZATION LIDAR
AT SUMMIT, GREENLAND
Ryan Reynolds Neely III, Matthew Hayman, Jeffrey P. Thayer, R. Michael Hardesty, Michael O’Neill, Robert Stillwell, Catherine Alvarez
S1P-24TWO YEARS OPERATION OF MULTIWAVELENGTH AEROSOL LIDAR IN TURKEY
K. R. Allakhverdiev, M. F. Huseyinoglu, Z. Yu. Salaeva, A. Secgin, I. Veselovskii, M. Korenskii, N. Volkov
S1P-25RECENT UPGRADES OF THE MULTIWAVELENGTH POLARIZATION RAMAN LIDAR POLLYXT
Ronny Engelmann, Dietrich Althausen, Birgit Heese, Holger Baars, Mika Komppula
S1P-26MONITORING WAKE VORTICES WITH A SCANNING DOPPLER LIDAR
Sophie Loaëc, Ludovic Thobois, Jean Pierre Cariou, Agnès Dolfi-Bouteyre, Didier Goular
S1P-27DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF AN OPTICAL FIBER-BASED LASER REMOTE SENSOR FOR AIRBORNE MEASUREMENT OF WIND VELOCITY
Scott M. Spuler, Mike Spowart, Dirk Richter
S1P-28ESTIMATION OF WIND TURBINE WAKE CHARACTERISTICS FROM DOPPLER LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Yelena Pichugina, R. M. Banta, W. A. Brewer, J. K. Lundquist, R. M. Hardesty, R. J. Alvarez, M. L. Aitken, S. P. Sandberg, A. M. Weickmann, N. D. Kelley and J. D. Mirocha
S1P-29COST-EFFECTIVE LIDAR TECHNOLOGY FOR WIND-ENERGY
Samu Tapani Järvinen, Juha Toivonen, Juho Kerttula, Valery Filippov, Oleg Okhotnikov, Samuli Laukkanen, Hannu Valo



S1P-30DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF DOPPLER LIDAR FOR ATMOSPHERIC WIND OBSERVATIONS
Karnam Raghunath, Achuthan Jayaraman
S1P-31MIDDLE-ATMOSPHERE WIND DETECTION USING A MOBILE DOPPLER RAYLEIGH LIDAR BASED ON TRIPLE-CHANNEL FABRY-PEROT INTERFEROMETER
Haiyun Xia, Dongsong Sun, XianKang Dou, Zhifeng Xue, Yan Han, Dongdong Hu
S1P-32DEVELOPMENT OF ALL-FIBER COHERENT DOPPLER LIDAR TO MEASURE ATMOSPHERE WIND SPEED
Jiqiao Liu, Xiaolei Zhu, Xiaopeng Zhu, Weifeng Diao, Yuan Liu, De cang Bi, Weibiao Chen
S1P-33AN ABSOLUTE FREQUENCY STABILIZATION SYSTEM DESIGN FOR USTC SODIUM TEMPERATURE/WIND LIDAR
Fang Xin, Li Tao, Liu Wei, Gu Shengyang
S1P-34
REFURBISHMENT AND UPGRADE OF FE BOLTZMANN/RAYLEIGH TEMPERATURE LIDAR AT BOULDER FOR A MCMURDO LIDAR CAMPAIGN IN ANTARCTICA
Zhangjun Wang, Xinzhao Chu, Wentao Huang, Weichun Fong, John Anthony Smith, Brendan Roberts
S1P-35ANALYSIS FOR THE MEASUREMENT CAPABILITY OF ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE USING THE MOBILE DOPPLER LIDAR
Yubao Chen, Yuchun Gao, Zhaoai Yan, Zhe Li, Bingyi Liu, Huang Li
S1P-36DEEP UV RAMAN-LIDAR GAS ANALYZER FOR ENVIRONMENT MONITORING
Sergey Mikhailovich Bobrovnikov, Evgeny Vladimirovich Gorlov, Viktor Ivanovich Zharkov
S1P-37A 2-MICRON PULSED INTEGRATED PATH DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION LIDAR DEVELOPMENT FOR ATMOSPHERIC CO2 CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS
Jirong Yu, Mulugeta Petros, Karl Reithmaier, Yingxin Bai, Bo Trieu, Tamer F. Refaat, Michael J. Kavaya, Upendra N Singh, Syed Ismail
S1P-38DIGITAL LOCK-IN DETECTION FOR MULTIPLE-FREQUENCY INTENSITY MODULATED CONTINUOUS WAVE CO2 LASER LIDAR
Songsheng Chen, Yingxin Bai, Larry B. Petway, Byron L. Meadows, Joel F, Campbell, Fenton W. Harrison, Edward V. Browell
S1P-39FREQUENCY CHIRPED INTENSITY MODULATED LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AT 1.57 MICRON WAVELENGTH FOR MEASUREMENT OF CO2 CONCENTRATION
Masaharu Imaki, Shumpei Kameyama, Yoshihito Hirano, Shinichi Ueno, Daisuke Sakaizawa, Shuji Kawakami, Masakatsu Nakajima
S1P-40LIDAR DETECTION OF EXPLOSIVE PRECURSORS
Luca Fiorani, Sergey Babichenko, Jonathan Bennes, Rodolfo Borelli, Roberto Chirico, Agnes Dolfi-Bouteyre, Laurent Hespel, Thierry Huet, Valentin Mitev, Antonio Palucci, Marco Pistilli, Adriana Puiu, Ott Rebane
S1P-41EXPERIMENTAL CO2 MEASUREMENT BY COHERENT 2 µM DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION AND WIND LIDAR WITH ATMOSPHERIC AND HARD TARGET RETURNS
Shoken Ishii, Mizuki Koyama, Kohei Mizutani, Philippe Baron, Hironori Iwai, Ryoko Oda, Hirotake Fukuoka, Takayoshi Ishikawa, Toshikazu Itabe1, Atsushi Sato, Kazuhiro Asai
S1P-42CHARM-F – THE AIRBORNE CH4 AND CO2 IPDA LIDAR: STATUS AND OUTLOOK
Axel Amediek, Christian Büdenbender, Gerhard Ehret, Andreas Fix, Christoph Kiemle, Mathieu Quatrevalet, Martin Wirth, Dieter Hoffmann, Raphael Kasemann, Jürgen Klein, Jens Löhring, Volker KleinS1P-43REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE BY COMBINING LIDAR AND oPTICAL CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY
Benjamin Thomas, Alain Miffre, Grégory David, Jean-Pierre Cariou, Patrick Rairoux 
S1P-44
HIGH-RESOLUTION LIDAR MEASUREMENTS OF OZONE PROFILES IN THE EQUATORIAL TROPOPAUSE REGION
Makoto Abo, Chikao Nagasawa, Yasukuni Shibata
S1P-45RECONFIGURATION OF THE NOAA TOPAZ LIDAR FOR GROUND-BASED MEASUREMENT OF OZONE AND AEROSOL BACKSCATTER
Raul J Alvarez, Christoph J Senff, Ann M Weickmann, Scott P Sandberg, Andrew O Langford, Richard D Marchbanks, W Alan Brewer, R Michael Hardesty
S1P-46LIDAR DETECTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN VOLCANIC EMISSIONS
Luca Fiorani, Wasan R. Saleh, Michael Burton, Laurent Hespel, Thierry Huet
S1P-47SCANNING UV LIDAR FOR EXPLOSIVES DETECTION
Sergey Mikhailovich Bobrovnikov, Evgeny Vladimirovich Gorlov, Viktor Ivanovich Zharkov, Yury Nikolaevich Panchenko
S1P-48SIMULID, PULSED FOCUSED LIDAR SIMULATION SOFTWARE
Mehdi Machta, Jean-Pierre Cariou, Matthieu Valla
S1P-49AUTOMATED, UNSUPERVISED INVERSION OF MULTIWAVELENGTH RAMAN LIDAR DATA: STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF MICROPHYSICAL PARAMETERS
Eduard Chemyakin, Alexei Kolgotin, Anton Romanov, Detlef Müller
S1P-50INFLUENCE OF THE UNCERTAINTY OF THE IMAGINARY PART OF THE REFRACTIVE INDEX ON THE RETRIEVAL ACCURACY OF PARTICLE SCATTERING AND ABSORPTION COEFFICIENTS AND SINGLE SCATTERING ALBEDO: NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS FOR THE CASE OF MULTIWAVELENGTH RAMAN LIDAR DATA
Alexei Kolgotin, Eduard Chemyakin, Anton Romanov, Detlef Müller
S1P-51ON THE DETERMINATION OF STRATOSPHERIC AEROSOL LAYERS
Wagner Frank, Jana Preißler
S1P-52ENHANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF SEMITRANSPARENT MEDIA THROUGH APPLICATION OF POLARIZATION LIDAR
Steven Mitchell, Jeffrey P. Thayer
S1P-53AN INNOVATIVE LIDAR INSTRUMENT FOR MONITORING THE ATMOSPHERIC PARTICULATE
Xuan Wang, Antonella Boselli, Gianluca Pisani, Nicola Spinelli, Valentino Tontodonato
S1P-54MULTIWAVELENGTH RAMAN LIDAR CONSTRUCTION TO MONITOR VOLCANIC ASH AND AEROSOLS IN BARILOCHE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ARGENTINA
Ezequiel Pawelko, Pablo Ristori, Lidia Otero, Raúl D’Elia, Andrea Pereyra, Osvaldo Vilar, Fernando Chouza, Juan Pallotta, Francisco González,Martín Fernandez, Sebastián Lema, Nobuo Sugimoto, Eduardo Quel


S1P-55PROFILING OF POORLY STRATIFIED SMOKY ATMOSPHERES WITH SCANNING LIDAR
Vladimir Kovalev, Cyle Wold, Alexander Petkov, Wei Min Hao
S1P-56MICROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF BURNING BIOMASS FROM RAMAN LIDAR
Christine Böckmann, Lukas Osterloh, Doina Nicolae, Livio Belegante
S1P-57PRELIMINARY STUDIES OF THE BACKSCATTERING OF INDUSTRIAL FLARE USING LIDAR TECHNIQUE IN CUBATAO, BRAZIL
Renata Facundes da Costa, E. Landulfo, W. M. Nakaema, R. Bourayou, P. F. Moreira, R. Guardani
S1P-58MULTI-ELEMENT MONITORING OF LIVINGSPHERE WITH LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE SPECTRUM (LIFS) LIDAR
Yasunori Saito, Kazuki Kobayashi, Takeshi Ootani
S1P-59DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT AND UNATTENDED MICROPULSE LIDAR IN QINGDAO, CHINA
Zhangjun Wang, Libin Du, Junle Qu, Bin Lv, Jie Liu, Chengxuan Wu
S1P-60MULTIPLE-PATH LIDAR VIBROMETER FOR REMOTE MODAL STUDY OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BUILDINGS
Matthieu Valla, Julien Totems, Béatrice Augère, Didier Goular, Christophe Planchat, Didier Fleury, Claudine Besson, Philippe Guégen
S1P-61AUTOMATIC LASER RADAR SYSTEMS FOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING IN PROCESS INDUSTRIES
Simona Sasso, Claudio Lofrumento
S1P-62Improvement on LIDAR date calibration for upper atmospheric measurements of wide dynamics luminous signals
Sai Guan, Guotao Yang, Xuewu Cheng, Yong Yang, Jihong Wang, Xiaoxi Zhang
S1P-63Status Report on the design and assembly of a prototype HSRL for EAS air fluorescence telescopes
Prodromos Fetfatzis, Emmanouel Fokitis, Stavros Maltezos, Nikos Maragos, Ioannis Manthos, Agelika Georgakopoulou, Violeta Gika



DAY-2 Tuesday 26 June 2012
08:00 – 13:00REGISTRATION08:30 – 17:45ORAL PRESENTATIONS
08:30-09:00

Keynote Speaker: Donald J. Wuebbles
The Science of Climate Change: The Research Challenges
SESSION 3O : Aerosol Characterization – Clouds – Radiative propertiesCo-Chairs: Ulla Wandinger, Adolfo Comerón
S3O-01
09:00-09:30

AEROSOL-CLOUD INTERACTION, A NOTORIOUS SOURCE OF UNCERTAINTIES IN CLIMATE RESEARCH: ROLE OF LIDAR IN LIQUID-WATER AND MIXED-PHASE CLOUD STUDIES (INVITED)
Albert Ansmann, Patric Seifert, Johannes Bühl, Thomas Kanitz, Ronny Engelmann, Dietrich Althausen
S3O-02
09:30-09:45
WATER CLOUD MEASUREMENT USING RAMAN LIDAR TECHNIQUE: CURRENT UNDERSTANDING AND FUTURE WORK
Tetsu Sakai, Felicita Russo, David N Whiteman, David D. Turner, Igor Veselovskii, S. Harvey Melfi, Tomohiro Nagai
S3O-03
09:45-10:00
CORRELATED MEASUREMENTS OF HUMIDITY AND EXTINCTION IN CIRRUS CLOUDS BY AIRBORNE LIDARN
Martin Wirth, Silke Groß, Andreas Fix, Ehret Gerhard
S3O-04
10:00-10:15LIDAR BACKSCATTERING BY QUASI-HORIZONTALLY ORIENTED HEXAGONAL ICE PLATES
Anatoli Borovoi, Alexander Konoshonkin, Natalia Kustova, Hajime Okamoto
S3O-05
10:15-10:30MID-LATITUDE CIRRUS ANALYSIS WITH LIDARS: CLUSTERING AND MATCH APPROACH
Davide Dionisi, Philippe Keckhut, Christophe Hoareau, Nadege Montoux, Fernando Congeduti
10:30-11:00COFFEE BREAKCo-Chairs: Dimitrios Ballis, Albert Ansmann
S3O-06
11:00-11:15
RAMAN BACKSCATTER-COEFFICIENT SPECTRA OF CIRRUS ICE
Jens Reichardt
S3O-07
11:15-11:30DETERMINATION OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES WITH DUAL-FIELD-OF -VIEW RAMAN LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Jörg Schmidt, Ulla Wandinger, Aleksey V. Malinka, Johannes Bühl
S3O-08
11:30-12:00INTEGRATED REMOTE-SENSING TECHNIQUES TO STUDY AEROSOLS, CLOUDS, AND THEIR INTERACTION (INVITED)
Ulla Wandinger, Patric Seifert, Janet Wagner, Ronny Engelmann, Johannes Bühl, Jörg Schmidt, Birgit Heese, Holger Baars, Anja Hiebsch, Thomas Kanitz, Dietrich Althausen, Albert Ansmann

S3O-09
12:00-12:15Algorithm and software for the retrieval of vertical aerosol properties using combined lidar/radiometer data: dissemination in EARLINET
Anatoli Chaikovsky, Oleg Dubovik, Philippe Goloub, Didier Tanré, Gelsomina Pappalardo, Ulla Wandinger, Ludmila Chaikovskaya, Sergei Denisov, Yan Grudo, Anton Lopatsin, Yana Karol, Tatyana Lapyonok, Michail Korol, Fiodor Osipenko, Dzmitry Savitski, Alexander Slesar, Arnoud Apituley, Lucas Alados Arboledas, Ioannis Binietoglou, Panayotis Kokkalis, María José Granados Muñoz, Alexandros Papayannis, Maria Rita Perrone, Aleksander Pietruczuk, Gianluca Pisani, Francesc Rocadenbosch, Michaël Sicard, Ferdinando De Tomasi, Janet Wagner, Xuan Wang
S3O-10
12:15-12:30Evaluation of a combined lidar and sunphotometer retrieval algorithm to determine aerosol microphysical properties
Janet Wagner, Ulla Wandinger, Albert Ansmann, Patric Seifert, Anatoli Chaikovsky
S3O-11
12:30-12:45RETRIEVING FINE AND COARSE MODE EXTINCTION COEFFICIENT PROFILES FROM LIDAR AND SUNPHOTOMETRY SYNERGY
David Daou, Norman T. O'Neill, Kevin Strawbridge, Michael Travis
S3O-12
12:45-13:00AEROSOL SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION DURING DRAGON EXPERIMENT AS SEEN BY A MOBILE GROUND-BASED LIDAR-SUNPHOTOMETER SYSTEM PRELIMINARY RESULTS
Augustin Mortier, Philippe Goloub, Brent Holben, Thierry Podvin, Luc Blarel, Christian Verwaerde, Yana Karol, Ilya Slutsker, Jean-Yves Balois, Didier Tanre, Timothy Berkoff, Stephane Victori, Richard Mathieu
13:00-14:00LUNCH BREAKCo-Chairs: Vassilis Amiridis, Eduardo Landulfo
S3O-13
14:00-14:15
OPTICAL AND MICROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES FROM RAMAN LIDAR AND DEPOLARIZATION DATA
Christine Böckmann, Lukas Osterloh, Tom Rother, Ilya Serikov, Holger Linne, Stefan Kinne
S3O-14
14:15-14:30RETRIEVAL OF HEIGHT-TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF PARTICLE PARAMETERS FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH LIDAR MEASUREMENTS DURING DISCOVER-AQ 2011 CAMPAIGN
Igor Veselovskii, David N. Whiteman, Alexei Kolgotin, Mikhail Korenskiy, Daniel Perez Ramirez
S3O-15
14:30-14:45GEOMETRICAL, OPTICAL AND MICROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS IN NORTHERN INDIA
Elina Giannakaki, Tero Mielonen, Kimmo Korhonen, Heilli Lihavainen, Anti-Pekka Hyvärinen, Detlef Müller, Holger Baars, Ronny Engelmann, Dietrich Althausen, TS Panwar, Rakesh Hooda, Ved Prakash Sharma, Kari Lehtinen, Yrjö Viisanen, Mika Komppula
S3O-16
14:45-15:00NON-SPHERICAL PARTICLES OPTICAL PROPERTIES USING SCATTERING MATRIX AND POLARIZATION LIDAR
Grégory David, Benjamin Thomas, Alain Miffre and Patrick Rairoux
S3O-17
15:00-15:15HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR DEVELOPMENTS AND APPLICATIONS AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER
Chris A. Hostetler, Richard A. Ferrare, Johnathan W. Hair, Anthony L. Cook, David B. Harper, Terry Mack, Craig S. Cleckner, Sharon P. Burton, Raymond R. Rogers, Michael D. Obland, Richard J. Hare, Amy Jo Scarino, Carolyn Butler, Yongxiang Hu, Detlef Müller, Eduard Chemyakin, Dong Liu
S3O-18
15:15-15:30AIRBORNE AND GROUND MEASUREMENTS WITH A HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR
Bruce Morley, Scott Spuler, I. A. Razenkov, Jothiram Vivekanandan, Edwin W. Eloranta
S3O-19
15:30-15:45DISCOVER-AQ: DETERMINING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SATELLITE RETRIEVED COLUMN AOD, EXTINCTION PROFILES, AND SURFACE PM2.5
Raymond M. Hoff, Timothy Berkoff, Ruben Delgado, Patricia Sawamura, Richard Ferrare, John Hair, Chris Hostetler, Ray Rogers, Mike Obland, Bruce Anderson, James Crawford, Brent Holben
S3O-20
15:45-16:00AEROSOL LAYER DECOUPLING IN THE NORTHERN SOUTH CHINA SEA PROFILED BY MPLNET LIDAR DURING THE SPRING 2010 DONGSHA ISLAND EXPERIMENT
Simone Lolli, Sheng-Hsiang Wang, Ellsworth Judd Welton, James Campbell, Brent Holben

16:00-16:30COFFEE BREAKCo-Chairs: Chris A. Hostetler, Igor Veselovkii
S3O-21
16:30-16:45
DUST AEROSOL PROFILING BY GROUND-BASED AND AIRBORNE LIDAR IN THE FRAMEWORK OF FENNEC
Patrick Chazette, Cyrille Flamant, Philippe Royer, Fabien Marnas, Cécile Kocha, Pascal Genau, Pascal Doira, Diduer Bruneau, Jacques Pelon, Joseph Sanak
S3O-22
16:45-17:00OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF UNUSUALLY DENSE MINERAL DUST OUTBREAKS OVER KOREA OBSERVED WITH MULTIWAVELENGTH/ AEROSOL/DEPOLARIZATION/ RAMAN QUARTZ LIDAR
Boyan Tatarov, Detlef Müller, Youngmin Noh, Dong-Ho Shin, Sung-Kyun Shin, Young Joon Kim
S3O-23
17:00-17:15GLOBAL SCALE LIDAR RATIO RETRIEVAL OVER THE OCEAN
Damien Benjamin Josset, Jacques Pelon, Yongxiang Hu, Raymond Rogers, Zhaoyan Liu, Ali Omar, Mark Vaughan, Peng-Wang Zhai, and the ICARE team
S3O-24
17:15-17:30OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF BIOMASS BURNING AEROSOL IN THE AMAZON BASIN
Holger Baars, Dietrich Althausen, Albert Ansmann, Ronny Engelmann, Birgit Heese, Ulla Wandinger, Detlef Müller, Rodrigo Souza, Theotonio Pauliquevis, Paulo Artaxo
S3O-25
17:30-17:45CHANGE OF OPTICAL AND MICROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF BIOMASS BURNING AEROSOL DURING TRANSPORT IN THE FREE TROPOSPHERE
Doina Nicolae, Detlef Müller, Camelia Talianu, Anca Nemuc, Adrian Timofte
18:00 – 20:00POSTER PRESENTATIONSSESSION 2P : Networking-Forecast ModelsCo-Chairs: Toshiyuki Murayama, Doina Nicolae
S2P-01
ARIADNE: the Greek Lidar Network
Alexandros Papayannis, Dimitrios Balis, Panayotis Kokkalis, Rodelise Mamouri, Georgios Tsaknakis, Elina Giannakaki, Nikos Siomos, Vassilis Amiridis



S2P-02A NEW LIDAR AND CLOUD RADAR NETWORK IN FINLAND
Anne Emilia Hirsikko, Ewan J. O´Connor, Mika Komppula, Matthias Bauer-Pfundstein, Antti Poikonen, Eleni Giannakaki, Mikko Kurri, Tomi Karppinen, Heikki Lihavainen, Ari Laaksonen, Kari E.J. Lehtinen, Yrjö Viisanen
S2P-03DEVELOPMENT OF AN ARGENTINEAN LIDAR NEWORK TO MONITOR THE VOLCANIC PLUME AND DUST IN PATAGONIA
Pablo R. Ristori, Lidia A. Otero, Ezequiel Pawelko, Juan Pallotta, Raúl D’Elía, Fernando Chouza, Francisco Gonzalez, Juan Carlos Dworniczak, Osvaldo Vilar, Andrea Pereyra,Martín Fernández, Sebastián Lema, Nobuo Sugimoto, Eduardo Quel
S2P-04A MET OFFICE FORWARD OPERATOR FOR ATTENUATED BACKSCATTER
Owen Cox and Cristina Charlton-Pérez
S2P-05EVALUATING GLOBAL AEROSOL MASS TRANSPORT MODELING SKILL USING MPLNET LEVEL 2.0 PROFILES OF EXTINCTION COEFFICIENT
Ellsworth J. Welton, James R. Campbell, Jianglong Zhang, Randall S. Johnson, Santo V. Salinas, Boon Ning Chew, Jeffrey S. Reid, Joseph M. Prospero
SESSION 3P : Aerosol Characterization – Clouds – Radiative PropertiesCo-Chairs: Joe Shaw, Anatolii Chaikovsky
S3P-01
THE EFFECT OF THE AEROSOL VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION ON THE SOLAR RADIATION PROFILES
Stelios Kazadzis, Natalia Kouremeti, Elina Giannakaki, Vassilis Amiridis, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri, Dimitrios Balis, Alexandros Papayannis
S3P-02INVESTIGATION THE OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND RADIATIVE EFFECTS OF AEROSOLS FROM SOUTHEAST CHINA AND INDOCHINA BY A MICRO-PULSE LIDAR IN TAIWAN
Wei-Nai Chen, Kai-Hsuan Hsu, Li-Ting Chen, Tian-Ren Yang, M. Roja Raman, Neng-Huei Lin, Sheng-Hsiang Wang
S3P-03AEROSOL OPTICAL AND RADIATIVE PROPERTIES DURING DUST AND HAZE EVENTS OVER HEFEI, CHINA
Zhenzhu Wang, Dong Liu, Decheng Wu, Chenbo Xie, Jun Zhou, Yingjian Wang
S3P-04FIRST-TIME ESTIMATION OF RADIATIVE FORCING BY THE DUST AND POLLUTION CONTENT IN MIXED EAST ASIAN POLLUTION PLUMES ON THE BASIS OF DEPOLARIZATION RATIOS MEASURED WITH LIDAR
Young M. Noh, Hanlim Lee, Detlef Muller, Kwon-ho Lee, Gwanchul Kim, Dong-ho Shin, Boyan Tatarov, Sung-kyun Shin, Young J. Kim
S3P-05
THE CALIPSO LIDAR DUST MEASUREMENT: A TRANS-PACIFIC TRANSPORT EVENT OF ASIAN DUST IN APRIL 2010
Zhaoyan Liu, Duncan Fairlie, Raymond Rogers, Sharon Rodier, Mark Vaughan, Ali Omar, Charles Trepte, David Winker, Yongxiang Hu
S3P-06DUST WATER INTERACTION OBSERVED BY USING RAMAN AND POLARIZATION LIDAR
Jan Bai Nee, Chih Wei Chiang
S3P-07DUST AND ICE OCCURRENCE RATIOS OVER DUST SOURCES OBSERVED BY SPACE/GROUND BASED ACTIVE REMOTE SENSOR
Yoshitaka Jin, Kenji Kai, Hajime Okamoto, Yuichiro Hagihara, Hongfei Zhou
S3P-08AEROSOL PROPERTIES FOR A DUST EVENT OBSERVED OVER CYPRUS
Argyro Nisantzi, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri, Diofantos G.Hadjimitsis
S3P-09DUST DEPOLARIZATION RATIOS OF ASIAN DUST OBSERVED WITH MULTI-WAVELENGTH RAMAN LIDAR IN KOREA
Sungkyun Shin, Young Min Noh, Boyan Tatarov, Dongho Shin, Detlef Müller
S3P-10LIDAR DEPOLARIZATION AND SUN PHOTOMETER POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS FOR PARTICLE CHARACTERIZATION OVER GUANGZHOU, CHINA
Birgit Heese, Dietrich Althausen, Michael Bauditz, Ruoyu Bao, Ruru Deng, Zhengqiang Li
S3P-11STUDY OF MIXT AEROSOLS USING DEPOLARIZATION LIDAR AND AMS DATA
Jeni Vasilescu, Doina Nicolae, Luminita Marmureanu, Livio Belegante
S3P-12VARIABILITY OF MIXING AEROSOLS OVER A S-E MEDITERRANEAN SITE
Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri, Argyro Nisantzi, Panayotis Kokkalis, Diofantos G. Hadjimitsis
S3P-13OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF ANTHROPOGENIC AEROSOLS OVER THESSALONIKI, GREECE DURING SCOUT-O3 CAMPAIGN
Elina Giannakaki, Dimitrios Balis, Vassilis Amiridis
S3P-14TROPOSPHERIC MEASUREMENTS OF AEROSOL OPTICAL PROPERTIES AT CONCEPCIÓN, CHILE (36°S, 73°W)
Antonieta Silva, E. Montilla-Rosero, C. Jimenez, C. Saavedra, R. Hernandez
S3P-15LINEAR ESTIMATION OF TIME SERIES OF BULK PARTICLE PARAMETERS FROM MULTI-WAVELENGTH LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Igor Veselovskii, Alexei Kolgotin, Michael Korenskiy, David Whiteman, Oleg Dubovik, Nikolai Volkov
S3P-16ON THE INFLUENCE OF A PRIORI ABSORPTION INFORMATION IN THE AEROSOL MICROPHYSICAL RETRIEVALS FROM MULTI-WAVELENGTH LIDAR DATA
Patricia Sawamura, Detlef Müller, Raymond M. Hoff
S3P-17AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION OVER SOUTHEASTERN ITALY BY MULTI-WAVELENGHT LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Olga Cavalieri, Maria Rita Perrone, Ferdinando De Tomasi 
S3P-18
PROPERTIES OF ARCTIC AEROSOL, A CASE STUDY DERIVED AT SPITSBERGEN
Christoph Ritter, Maria Stock, Anne Hoffmann, Roland Neuber
S3P-19Observation of high load of stratosphericaerosols over Hampton-USA-2011
Boyouk, Neda, Kevin Leavor, M. Patrick Mccormick
S3P-20PROPERTIES OF THREE AIR MASSES OBSERVED IN AUGUST 2011 IN SOPOT, POLAND
Iwona S. Stachlewska, Anna Rozwadowska, Krzysztof M. Markowicz, Przemyslaw Makuch




S3P-21FRESH SMOKE AEROSOL LAYERS OBSERVATIONS BY A MULTI-WAVELENGTH RAMAN LIDAR OVER ATHENS, DURING HELLENIC WILD FIRES
Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri, Alexandros Papayannis, Detlef Müller, George Tsaknakis, Panayiotis Kokkalis, Vassilis Amiridis
S3P-22AEROSOL VERTICAL MASS CONCENTRATION ASSESSMENT AND INTER-COMPARISON WITH MODEL DERIVED PROFILES
Nikos Papagiannopoulos, Elina Giannakaki, Dimitrios Balis
S3P-23VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF AEROSOLS OVER THE GREATER MEDITERRANEAN BASIN USING CALIOP OBSERVATIONS
Vassilis Pappas, Nikos Hatzianastassiou
S3P-24CHARACTERIZATION OF TRAFFIC AEROSOLS USING LIDAR, SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, AND A PERSONAL CASCADE IMPACTOR
Maria Cecilia D. Galvez, Ernest P. Macalalad, Teresita A. Peralta, and Edgar A. Vallar
S3P-25CONTINUOUS AND AUTOMATIC MEASUREMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC STRUCTURES AND AEROSOLS OPTICAL PROPERTIES WITH R-MAN510 NITROGEN RAMAN LIDAR
Anthony Bizard, Philippe Royer, Laurent Sauvage, Matthieu Boquet, Ludovic Thobois, Melody Renaudier, B. Bennai 
S3P-26RETRIEVAL OF AEROSOL AND CLOUD OPTICAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE TROPOSPHERE BASED ON VERTICAL AND PLAN-POSITION INDICATOR LIDAR SIGNALS IN COMBINATION WITH GROUND-BASED MEASUREMENTS
Tatsuo Shiina, Yusaku Mabuchi, Hayato Saito, Gerry Bagtasa, Masanori Yabuki, Naohiro Manago, Nobuo Takeuchi, Hiroaki Kuze
S3P-27SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATION OF AEROSOLS USING THE DURBAN AND REUNION LIDAR SYSTEMS
Nkanyiso Bongumusa Mbatha, V. Sivakumar, Hassan Bencherif, Philippe Keckhut 
S3P-28THE USE OF RAMAN LIDAR FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLE HYGROSCOPICITY: ANALYSIS OF SELECTED CASE STUDIES FROM THE CONVECTIVE AND OROGRAPHICALLY-INDUCED PRECIPITATION STUDY
Dario Stelitano, Paolo Di Girolamo, Donato Summa, Tatiana Di Iorio
S3P-29EVALUATION OF HYGROSCOPIC GROWTH OF URBAN AEROSOLS USING RAMAN LIDAR TECHNIQUE DURING NASA DISCOVER-AQ CAMPAIGN
Patricia Ferrini Rodrigues, E. Landulfo, B. B. Demoz, D. D. Venable, M. Walker, R. Connell, D. N. Whiteman
S3P-30
MEASUREMENTS OF CIRRUS CLOUD COLOR RATIO WITH A MULTI-WAVELENGTH LIDAR
Zongming Tao, Dong Liu, Bo Shi, Miao Nie, Xiaomin Ma, Heli Wei, Zhiqing Zhong, Jun Zhou
S3P-31METHODOLOGY FOR A ROBUST RETRIEVAL OF THE EXTINCTION-TO-BACKSCATTER RATIO OF CIRRUS CLOUDS BASED ON LIDAR MEASUREMENTS AT SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL
Eliane Gonçalves Larroza, Walter Morinobu Nakaema, Christophe Hoareau, Eduardo Landulfo, Philippe Keckhut
S3P-32SEASONAL EVOLUTION OF CIRRUS CLOUDS OVER NORTHWEST OF IRAN
Ruhollah Moradhaseli, Hadi Borzouei, Hamid Reza Khalesifard

S3P-33SYNERGETIC INFRASTRUCTURE FOR TRACE GAS AND AEROSOL MEASUREMENTS AND CHARACTERIZATION AT THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS AND THE NATIONAL OBSERVATORY OF ATHENS, GREECE
Alexandros Papayannis, Panayotis Kokkalis, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri, Vassilis Amiridis, Emmanouella Remoundaki, Georgios Tsaknakis, Stylianos Kazadzis, Alexandra Tsekeri, Eleni MarinouS3P-34AEROSOL OPTICAL PROPERTIES STUDIED IN COASTAL AREAS WITH USE OF REMOTE TECHNIQUES
Tymon Zielinski, Tomasz Petelski, PrzemysBaw Makuch, Agata Strzalkowska, Agnieszka Ponczkowska, Marcin Wichorowski, Krzysztof Markowicz, Giorgos Chourdakis, Giorgos Georgoussis
S3P-35AEROSOL OPTICAL MODELING FOR REMOTE SENSING IN THE COASTAL ATMOSPHERE SURFACE LAYER
Gennady Kaloshin
S3P-36THE SYNERGY OF EARLINET AND AERONET OBSERVATIONS FOR OCEAN COLOR RETRIEVALS
Elina Giannakaki, Detlef Müller, Ina Mattis, Olaf Krüger, Carsten Brockmann, Thom Vi Thi Huong, Ewa Kwiatkowska
S3P-37SYNCHRONIZED STARPHOTOMETRY AND LIDAR MEASUREMENTS IN THE HIGH ARCTIC
Konstantin Baibakov, Norman O'Neill, Liviu Ivanescu, Chris Perro, Christoph Ritter, Andreas Herber, Tom Duck, Karl-Heinz Schulz, Otto Schrems
S3P-38EVALUATION OF FINE MODE LIDAR CONCENTRATION RETRIEVALS USING AIRBORNE IN-SITU MEASUREMENTS
Panayotis Kokkalis, Alexandros Papayannis, Vassilis Amiridis, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri, Anatoli Chaikovsky, Oleg Dubovik, Alexandra Tsekeri
S3P-39EVALUATION OF DUST MODELLING USING A SYNERGETIC ALGORITHM OF LIDAR AND SUNPHOTOMETER DATA
Alexandra Tsekeri, Vassilis Amiridis, Panayotis Kokkalis, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri, Alexandros Papayannis, Sara Basart, Anatoli Chaikovsky, Oleg Dubovik, José Maria Baldasano
S3P-40ENHANCEMENT FACTORS AT ISPRA EMEP-GAW STATION
Mariana Adam, Jean-Philippe Putaud, Sebastiao Martins dos Santos, Alessandro Dell’Acqua, Carsten Gruening
S3P-41THE EOLE LIDAR SYSTEM OF THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS
Panayotis Kokkalis, Alexandros Papayannis, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri, Georgios Tsaknakis, Vassilis Amiridis
S3P-42AEROSOL CLASSIFICATION USING AIRBORNE HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Silke Groß, Martin Wirth, Michael Esselborn
S3P-43SMOKE AND DUST PLUME OBSERVATIONS BY A MIE-RAMAN LIDAR, SUNPHOTOMETER AND SATELLITE IN THE NORTHEAST US
Barry Gross, Lina Cordero, Yonghua Wu, Fred Moshary, Sam Ahmed



S3P-44LIDAR INVESTIGATION OF AEROSOL PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION UNDER CUMULUS BASE
Tadeusz Stacewicz, Michal Posyniak, Szymon P. Malinowski, Anna K. Jagodnicka, Stefan Sitarek, Sylwester Arabas
SESSION 8P : Boundary Layer - MeteorologyCo-Chairs: Edwin Eloranta, Cyrille Flamant
S8P-01
ANNUAL VARIABILITY OF ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER IN WARSAW
Iwona S. Stachlewska, Szymon Migacz, Artur Szkop, Anna J. Zielinska, Michal Piadlowski, Pawel L. Swaczyna, Krzysztof Markowicz, Szymon Malinowski, Anna Gorska
S8P-02CHARACTERIZATION OF PBL HEIGHT AND STRUCTURE BY RAMAN LIDAR: SELECTED CASE STUDIES FROM THE CONVECTIVE AND OROGRAPHICALLY-INDUCED PRECIPITATION STUDY
Donato Summa, Paolo Di Girolamo, Dario Stelitano
S8P-03EVOLUTION OF THE ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER: LIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING
Edson R. Marciotto, Walter M. Nakaema, Eduardo Landulfo
S8P-04ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER HEIGHT DETERMINATION: COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT METHODS AS APPLIED TO LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Daniel Toledo, Carmen Córdoba-Jabonero, Emilio Cuevas, Manuel Gil
S8P-05LIDAR OBSERVATIONS OF FINE-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC GRAVITY WAVES IN THE NOCTURNAL BOUNDARY LAYER ABOVE AN ORCHARD CANOPY
Elizabeth R. Jachens, Shane David Mayor,
S8P-06INVESTIGATION OF VERTICAL AEROSOL DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE VICINITY OF IOWA CITY
Tingyao He, Samo Stanic, William Eichinger, Brad Barnhart
S8P-07OBSERVATION IN THE TROPOSPHERE OVER MOUNTAIN VALLEY BY CEILOMETER, SUN PHOTOMETER AND LIDARS
Nikolay Kolev, Ivan Grigorov, Tsvetina Evgenieva, Atanaska Deleva, Evgeni Donev, Danko Ivanov, Doyno Petkov 
S8P-08
DEVELOPMENT OF BACKSCATTERED LIDAR SYSTEM AND FIRST TROPOSPHERIC MEASUREMENTS AT CONCEPCIÓN, CHILE (36°S, 73°W)
Elena Montilla, Silva Antonieta, Jiménez Cristofer, Saavedra Carlos, Hernández Rolando
S8P-09DETECTION OF THE BOUNDARY LAYER AND ENTRAINMENT ZONE BY LIDAR
Camelia Talianu, Doina Nicolae, Emil Carstea, Livio Belegante










DAY-3 Wednesday 27 June 2012








Guided tour to the ancient theater of EPIDAVROS

&

Visit to the old historic city of NAFPLION
DAY-4 Thursday 28 June 2012
08:00 – 13:00REGISTRATION08:30 – 18:15ORAL PRESENTATIONSSESSION 4O : Space MissionsCo-Chairs: Stuart Young, Itsushi Uno
S4O-01
08:30-09:00

ADM-Aeolus: ESA'S High Spectral Resolution Doppler Wind Lidar Mission Recent Achievements and Future Prospects (INVITED)
Olivier LeRille, Martin Endemann, Alain Culoma, Denny Wernham
S4O-02
09:00-09:15LATEST DEVELOPMENTS ON THE EARTHCARE LIDAR AND ESA SUPPORTING SCIENTIFIC STUDIES
Georgios Tzeremes, Arnaud Heliere, Dulce Lajas
S4O-03
09:15-09:30ESA’S SPACEBORNE LIDAR MISSIONS: CANDIDATE AND SELECTED CONCEPTS FOR WIND, AEROSOLS AND CO2 MONITORING
Anne Grete Straume, Paul Ingmann, Tobias Wehr
S4O-04
09:30-09:45CHAOS, CONSTERNATION AND CALIPSO CALIBRATION: NEW STRATEGIES FOR CALIBRATING THE CALIOP 1064 NM CHANNEL
Mark Vaughan, Anne Garnier, Zhaoyan Liu, Damien Josset, Yongxiang Hu, Kam-Pui Lee, William Hunt, Jean-Paul Vernier, Sharon Rodier, Jacques Pelon, David Winker
S4O-05
09:45-10:00THE GLOBAL 3D DISTRIBUTION OF TROPOSPHERIC AEROSOLS AS CHARACTERIZED BY CALIOP
David Winker, Jason Tackett, Brian Getzewich, Mark Vaughan
S4O-06
10:00-10:15GROUND-BASED VALIDATION OF CALIPSO OBSERVATIONS OF DUST AND SMOKE IN THE CAPE VERDE REGION
Matthias Tesche, Ulla Wandinger, Albert Ansmann, Dietrich Althausen, Detlef Müller, Ali H. Omar
S4O-07
10:15-10:30CALIOP OBSERVATIONS IN COASTAL REGIONS AT SOUTHERN MIDLATITUDES COMPARED TO POLLYXT MEASUREMENTS
Thomas Kanitz, Andreas Foth, Ulla Wandinger, Albert Ansmann, Ronny Engelmann, Dietrich Althausen, Claudio Casiccia, Felix Zamorano
10:30 – 11:00COFFEE BREAKCo-Chairs: David Winker, Anne Grete Straume
S4O-08
11:00-11:15
LIVAS: LIDAR CLIMATOLOGY OF VERTICAL AEROSOL STRUCTURE FOR SPACE-BASED LIDAR SIMULATION STUDIES
Vassilis Amiridis, Ulla Wandinger, Eleni Marinou, Olivier Le Rille, Stylianos Kazadzis, Alexandra Tsekeri, Elina Giannakaki, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri, Panayotis Kokkalis, Natalia Kouremeti, Themistoklis Herekakis, Alexandros Papayannis, Dimitrios Balis, Gelsomina Pappalardo



S4O-09
11:15-11:30AEROSOL DISTRIBUTION OVER MUNICH USING CALIPSO LEVEL 2 DATA AND COMPARISON WITH MODIS, AERONET AND MULIS DATA
Franziska Schnell, Matthias Wiegner
S4O-10
11:30-11:45CORRELATION, VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION AND COLUMN INTEGRATED CHARACTERISTICS OF AEROSOLS DURING WINTER-TIME DUST STORMS OVER THE MEDITERRANEAN REGION
Menas Kafatos, Anup Krishna Prasad, Hesham M. El-Askary, Dimitris G. Kaskaoutis
S4O-11
11:45-12:00Seasonal vertical distribution of the Saharan Air Layer based on 5 years of CALIPSO observations
Christoforos Tsamalis, Alain Chédin
S4O-12
12:00-12:15RETRIEVED ICE MICROPHYSICS FROM CALIPSO AND CLOUDSAT AND HORIZONTALLY ORIENTED ICE PLATES
Hajime Okamoto, Kaori Sato, Yuichiro Hagihara, Takuya Matsumoto, Anatoli Borovoi
S4O-13
12:15-12:30MULTI-SENSOR CIRRUS OPTICAL DEPTH ESTIMATES FROM CALIPSO
Anne Garnier, Mark A. Vaughan, Philippe Dubuisson, Damien Josset, Jacques Pelon, David M. Winker
S4O-14
12:30-12:45THE MERLIN INSTRUMENT FIRST SPACE BASED IPDA LIDAR FOR METHANE MONITORING
Christian Stephan, Matthias Alpers, Bruno Millet, Gerhard Ehret, Pierre Flamant
S4O-15
12:45-13:00MULTIWAVELENGTH SPACE-BORNE REMOTE SENSING OF CH4 AND CO2 BY IPDA LIDAR: ERRORS ESTIMATION
Gennady Matvienko, Alexander Sukhanov
13:00 – 14:00LUNCH BREAKCOFFEE BREAKSESSION 5O : Atmospheric Winds - TurbulenceCo-Chairs: Upendra Singh, Bruce Gentry
S5O-01
14:00-14:30
AIRBORNE LIDAR OBSERVATIONS SUPPORTING THE ADM-AEOLUS MISSION FOR GLOBAL WIND PROFILING (INVITED)
Oliver Reitebuch, Christian Lemmerz, Uwe Marksteiner, Stephan Rahm, Benjamin Witschas
S5O-02
14:30-14:45CROSS-WIND LIDAR PROTOTYPE
Geary Schwemmer, Matthew Banta, Alex Achey, Sangwoo Lee, Jie Lei, Mikhail Yakshin, Jumani Blango
S5O-03
14:45-15:002D-DECONVOLUTION METHOD TO REMOVE THE EFFECTS OF A CHIRPED LASER PULSE FROM COHERENT WIND LIDAR DATASETS
Johannes BÌhl, Ronny Engelmann, Albert Ansmann
S5O-04
15:00-15:15COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DIFFERENT THEORETICAL MODELS OF THE DOPPLER FREQUENCY ESTIMATION
Evgeniya A. Shelekhova, Alexander Shelekhov





S5O-05
15:15-15:30ALL-FIBER COHERENT DOPPLER LIDAR DEVELOPMENT FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF PLANETARY BOUNDARY LAYER DYNAMICS AND COMPARISON TO OTHER VERTICAL PROFILERS
Mark F. Arend, Sameh Abdelazim, David Santoro, Fred Moshary, Barry Gross, Yonghua Wu, Sam A. Ahmed
S5O-06
15:30-15:45EARLY RESULTS OF COMPACT COHERENT DOPPLER WIND LIDAR AT IITM, PUNE, INDIA
Panuganti C.S. Devara, Yeddu Jaya Rao, Sunil M. Sonbawne, M. G. Manoj, Kundan K. Dani
SESSION 6O : Other Lidar ApplicationsCo-Chairs: Upendra Singh, Bruce Gentry
S6O-01
15:45-16:00
THE DEVELOPMENT AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF AN OCEAN LIDAR FOR 3D LIF SPECTRA MEASUREMENT
JinTao Liu, KaiLin Zhang, RongGuo Su

16:00-16:30COFFEE BREAKSESSION 7O : Water Vapour -Temperature-Trace Gases-Air QualityCo-Chairs: Alexandros Papayannis, Christof Senff
S7O-01
16:30-17:00
TWO DECADES OF TROPOSPHERIC STUDIES WITH DIFFERENTIAL-ABSORPTION LIDAR SYSTEMS AT GARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN (INVITED)
Thomas Trickl
S7O-02
17:00-17:15VALIDATION AND OPERATIONAL ASPECTS OF THE RAMAN LIDAR FOR METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS, RALMO
Alexander Haefele, Emanuel Brocard, Valentin Simeonov, Todor Dinoev, Rolf Philipona, Dominique Ruffieux, Bertrand Calpini
S7O-03
17:15-17:30SIMULTANEOUS WATER VAPOUR AND AEROSOL LIDAR MEASUREMENTS AT ENVIRONMENT CANADA’S CENTRE FOR ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH EXPERIMENTS
Kevin Strawbridge, Watheq Al-Basheer
S7O-04
17:30-17:45CHARACTERIZATION OF CONVECTION-RELATED PARAMETERS BY RAMAN LIDAR: ANALYSIS OF SELECTED CASE STUDIES FROM THE CONVECTIVE AND OROGRAPHICALLY-INDUCED PRECIPITATION STUDY
Paolo Di Girolamo, Donato Summa, Dario Stelitano
S7O-05
17:45-18:00USING A DIODE-PUMPED SOLID-STATE LASER FOR TEMPERATURE PROFILING
Hugo Ricketts, Geraint Vaughan
S7O-06
18:00-18:15DEVELOPMENT OF A COMBINED CO2 AND WIND LIDAR (COWI) TO MONITOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION SITES
Fabien Gibert, Dimitri Edouart, Claire Cénac, Florian Le Mounier, Olivier Godde, Olivier Bousquet, Pierre Flamant, Philippe De Donato, Jacques Pironon, Odile Barres, Noémie Taquet, Pierre Cellier, Frederik Gal, K. Michel-Le Pierrès, Zbiniew Pokryszka, Stéphane Lafortune, Bruno Garcia, Joëlle Hy-Billiot, Hervé Lucas




18:15-20:00POSTER PRESENTATIONSSESSION 4P : Space MissionsCo-Chairs: Pat McCormick, Georgios Tzeremes
S4P-01
RESULTS OF THE CALIPSO LIDAR 532 NM LIDAR RATIO VALIDATION STUDY USING THE AERONET SUN-PHOTOMETER SYSTEM IN THE SOUTH AMERICA CONTINENT
Fabio J. S. Lopes, Eduardo Landulfo, Mark Alvim Vaughan
S4P-02EVALUATION OF CALIOP L2 AEROSOL EXTINCTION AND BACKSCATTER PROFILES WITH GROUND-BASED LIDAR MEASUREMENTS IN INDIA AND SOUTH AFRICA
Tero Mielonen, Elina Giannakaki, Ali Omar, Antti Arola, Kari E.J. Lehtinen, Mika Komppula
S4P-03COMPARATIVE STUDY OF LIDAR MEASUREMENTS FROM CALIPSO AND GROUND BASED
Anca Nemuc, Livio Belegante, Doina Nicolae, Jeni Vasilescu, Luminita Marmureanu
S4P-04INVESTIGATION OF REPRESENTATIVENESS OF CALIPSO AEROSOL OPTICAL PROPERTIES PRODUCTS BY EARLINET CORRELATIVE MEASUREMENTS
Lucia Mona, Nikolaos Papagiannopoulos, Giuseppe D'Amico, Aldo Giunta, Anja Hiebsch, Ulla Wandinger, Aldo Amodeo, Arnaud Apituley, Lucas Alados-Arboledas, Dimitrios Balis, Anatoli Chaikovsky, Adolfo Comeron, Ferdinando De Tomasi, Volker Freudenthaler, Ivan Grigorov, Marco Iarlori, Holger Linnè, Alexandros Papayannis, Aleksander Pietruczuk, Franziska Schnell, Nicola Spinelli, Matthias Wiegner, Gelsomina Pappalardo
S4P-05VALIDATION OF CALIPSO NIGHTTIME AEROSOL PRODUCTS USING AIRBORNE LIDAR AND IN-SITU OBSERVATIONS
Vassilis Amiridis, Alexandra Tsekeri, Franco Marenco, Eleni Marinou, Elina Giannakaki, Dimitrios Balis, Athanasios Nenes, James Allan, Asan Bacak , Hugh Coe
S4P-06COMPARISON OF AVERAGED EXTINCTION PROFILES FROM CALIPSO AND BSC-DREAM8B DUST MODEL OVER GREECE
Eleni Marinou, Vassilis Amiridis, Alexandra Tsekeri, Sara Basart, José Maria Baldasano, Stylianos Kazadzis, Alexandros Papayannis
S4P-07COMPARISON CASE BETWEEN CALIPSO LIDAR AND MALS ON M55 GEOPHYSICA DURING RECONCILE CAMPAIGN
Valentin Mitev, Lamont R. Poole, Michael C. Pitts, Renaud Matthey
S4P-08JUST HOW FAR DOES CALIPSO’S LIDAR PROFILE INTO CLOUDS?
Stuart A. Young
S4P-09NUMERICAL AND THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF HYDROMETEOR PROPERTIES OBSERVED BY SPACEBORNE LIDAR AND RADAR
Kaori Sato, Hajime Okamoto
S4P-10CH4 IPDA LIDAR MISSION DATA SIMULATOR FOR MERLIN: PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT AT IPSL/LMD
Sébastien Berthier, Pierre H. Flamant, Fabien Gibert, Cyril Crevoisier, Raymond Armante

S4P-11A 2D LIDAR SYSTEM FOR SPACE APPLICATIONS
Sebastian Ehrenreich
S4P-12RESEARCH ON LASER ALTIMETER ERROR WITH SATELLITE VIBRATION
Zhang Hui, Wang Chunhui, Wu Xueying
S4P-13COMPARISON OF GROUND-BASED LIDAR PROFILES WITH CALIPSO LEVEL 2 VERSION 3.01 DATA
Francisco Molero, Alfonso Javier Fernandez, Manuel Pujadas
SESSION 5P : Atmospheric Winds - TurbulenceCo-Chairs: Mike Hardesty, Rod Frehlich
S5P-01
CHALLENGES IN NOISE REMOVAL FROM DOPPLER SPECTRA ACQUIRED BY A CONTINUOUS-WAVE LIDAR
Nikolas Angelou, Farzad Foroughi Abari, Jakob Mann, Torben Mikkelsen, Mikael Sjöholm
S5P-02LIDAR INVESTIGATION OF ATMOSPHERE EFFECT ON A WIND TURBINE WAKE
Igor N. Smalikho, Yelena L. Pichugina, Victor A. Banakh, W. Alan Brewer, R.M. Banta, and J.K. Lundquist
SESSION 6P : Other Lidar ApplicationsCo-Chairs: Gilles Roy, Juan Carlos Antuña
S6P-01
CALIPSO SURFACE RETURN FOR ICE AND WATER DETECTION
Sharon Rodier, Yongxiang Hu, Mark Vaughan
S6P-02FLUORESCENCE MONITORING OF VEGETATION: THE CASE OF CHINESE TEA-LIDAR AND LABORATORY STUDIES
Liang Mei, Zuguang Guan, Gabriel Somesfalean, Sune Svanberg
S6P-03RETRIEVAL OF POLLEN OPTICAL DEPTH IN THE LOCAL ATMOSPHERE BY LIDAR
Young M. Noh, Hanlim Lee, Detlef Müller, Kwon-ho Lee, Dong-ho Shin, Boyan Tatarov, Sung-kyun Shin, Young J. Kim
S6P-04ESTIMATION OF LOW-CONCENTRATION HYDROGEN GAS BY USING COMPACT RAMAN LIDAR
Tatsuo Shiina, Yutaro Noguchi, Kazuo Noguchi, Tetsuo Fukuchi, Ippei Asahi, Sachiyo Sugimoto, Yuzo Shimamoto, Hideki Ninomiya
S6P-05application analysis of laser altimeter in space mapping camera system
Xu Chunxiao, Sun Shijun










SESSION 7P : Water Vapor-Temperature-Trace Gases-Air QualityCo-Chairs: Andreas Fix, Paolo Di Girolamo
S7P-01
WATER VAPOR CONTENT, AEROSOL OPTICAL DEPTH, AND PLANETARY BOUNDARY LAYER HEIGHT DETERMINED BY SUN PHOTOMETER, LIDAR AND CEILOMETER
Nikolay Kolev, Tsvetina Evgenieva, Doyno Petkov, Evgeni Donev, P.C.S. Devara, P. E. Raj, Nikolay Miloshev, B.L.B. Wiman, Ivan Kolev
S7P-02ON THE WAY TO COMBINED DIAL AND RAMAN-LIDAR SOUNDING OF WATER VAPOUR ON MT. ZUGSPITZE-A PROGRESS REPORT
Lisa Klanner, Thomas Trickl, Hannes Vogelmann
S7P-03VALIDATION OF COSMIC WATER VAPOR PROFILES USING RAMAN LIDAR MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED AT CIAO
Fabio Madonna, Pasquale Burlizzi, Ioannis Binietoglou, Aldo Giunta, Maria Rita Perrone, Gelsomina Pappalardo
S7P-04AUTOMATIC VARIABLE DOMAIN INTEGRATION TECHNIQUE FOR MULTI-CHANNEL RAMAN WATER VAPOUR LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Davide Dionisi, Gian Luigi Liberti, Fernando Congeduti
S7P-05INTERCOMPARISON OF WATER VAPOR CALIBRATION CONSTANTS DERIVED FROM IN-SITU AND DISTANT SOUNDINGS FOR A RAMAN-LIDAR OPERATING IN THE AMAZON FOREST
Henrique de Melo Jorge Barbosa, Diego Alves Gouveia, Paulo Artaxo, Theotonio Pauliquevis, David Adams, Rosa Maria Nascimento dos Santos
S7P-06CAELI WATER VAPOUR RAMAN LIDAR CALIBRATION AT THE CABAUW EXPERIMENTAL SITE FOR ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH
Arnoud Apituley, Fred Bosveld, Henk Klein Baltink, Keith M. Wilson
S7P-07TRANSPORTABLE MIE-RAMAN LIDAR SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENTS OF AEROSOLS, CLOUDS AND WATER VAPOR
Panuganti CS Devara, Yeddu Jaya Rao, Sanjoy K Saha, Sunil M Sonbawne, Kundan K Dani, Katta Vijay Kumar, Chakravartula Prasanna Simha
S7P-08THE NEW PURE ROTATIONAL-RAMAN CHANNEL OF ESRANGE LIDAR FOR MEASUREMENT OF TROPOSPHERIC AND LOWER STRATOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE
Peggy Achtert, Mikhail Khaplanov, Farahnaz Khosrawi, Jörg Gumbel
S7P-09STUDY OF THE TEMPERATURE VARIANCE PROFILE IN THE CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER WITH ROTATIONAL RAMAN TEMPERATURE LIDAR
Andreas Behrendt, Marcus Radlach, Sandip Pal, Volker Wulfmeyer
S7P-10VALIDATION OF THE DIRECT DETECTION 1.6 ¼M CO2 DIAL
Yasukuni Shibata, Chikao Nagasawa, Makoto Abo, Makoto Tsukamoto, Kazunori Shibayama
S7P-11Raman lidar for CO2 measurement in the low atmosphere
Shunxing Hu, Huanling Hu, Yingjian Wang, Peitao Zhao, Kaifa Cao, Xiangqian Meng, Haili Yu, Kèe Yuan, Zongming Tao, Shisheng Shao, Zhihai Xu


S7P-12VOLCANIC ASH OVER SCANDINAVIA ORIGINATING FROM THE GRÍMSVÖTN ERUPTIONS IN MAY 2011
Matthias Tesche, Paul Glantz, Christer Johansson, Michael Norman, Anja Hiebsch, Albert Ansmann, Dietrich Althausen, Ronny Engelmann, Patric Seifert
S7P-13LIDAR OBSERVATIONS OF DUST STORMS OVER HEFEI IN SPRING 2010
Decheng Wu, Dong Liu, Zhenzhu Wang, Bangxin Wang, Jun Zhou, Yingjian Wang
S7P-14LIDAR AND DOAS AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN MANILA, PHILIPPINES
Edgar Vallar, Shaira Jehsarine Narido, Francisco Moreno Jr., Bryan Mondy Barez, Maria Cecilia Galvez, Teresita Peralta, Jean Rosete, Ernest Macalalad, Vernon Morris
S7P-15RECENT RESULTS OF AIRBORNE MEASUREMENTS USING CHIRPED INTENSITY-MODULATED 1.57 ¼œ LASER ABSORPTION SPECTRO-METER
Daisuke Sakaizawa, Tomoaki Tanaka, Shuji Kawakami, Masakatsu Nakajima, Makoto Inoue, Isamu Morino, Osamu Uchino
S7P-16SCANNING ROTATIONAL RAMAN LIDAR WITH DAYTIME/NIGHTTIME OPTIMIZATION SWITCH
Eva Hammann, Andreas Behrendt, Andrea Riede, Alexander Geissler, Marcus Radlach, Volker Wulfmeyer
S7P-17REVEALING SURFACE LAYER HETEROGENEITIES WITH SCANNING WATER VAPOR DIAL AND SCANNING ROTATIONAL RAMAN LIDAR
Andreas Behrendt, Eva Hammann, Florian Späth, Andrea Riede, Simon Metzendorf, Volker Wulfmeyer
S7P-18JOINT LIDAR AND RADIOSONDE MEASUREMENTS OF LOWER TROPOSPHERIC PROPERTIES OVER VIPAVA VALLEY AND KARST PLATEAU
Fei Gao, S. Stani
, T. Y. He, K. Begant, D. Vodeb
S7P-19PRELIMINARY H2O PROFILE MEASUREMENTS OVER LAUDER, NEW ZEALAND
Thomas McGee, Laurence Twigg, Grant Sumnicht, Dale HurstSESSION 9P : Lower/Middle/Upper Atmosphere – Physics – Chemistry - TransportCo-Chairs: Chikao Nagasawa, Geraint Vaughan
S9P-01
LIDAR STUDIES OF AEROSOLS OVER POLAND
Agata Strzalkowska, PrzemysBaw Makuch, Olga Zawadzka, Tymon Zielinski, Tomasz Petelski, Krzysztof Markowicz, Iwona Stachlewska, Agnieszka Ponczkowska, Marcin Wichorowski 
S9P-02AIRBORNE LIDAR MEASUREMENTS FOR INVESTIGATION OF AEROSOL TRANSPORT FROM PYRO-CONVECTION AND VOLCANIC ERUPTION
Monika Aggarwal, James Whiteway, Jeff Seabrook, Cameron Dickinson
S9P-03DUAL WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE STRATOSPHERIC AEROSOL LAYER
Haviland Forrister, Gary Gimmestad, David Roberts, Allison Mercer
S9P-04COMPARING CALIOP AND AERONET CLOUD OPTICAL DEPTH AT CAMAGÜEY, CUBA
Boris Barja González and Juan Carlos Antuña Marrero

S9P-05MICRO PULSE LIDAR MEASUREMENTS FOR POLAR STRATOSPHERIC CLOUD MONITORING IN COASTAL ANTARCTICA. ™I. PCS-TYPE DESCRIMINATION ASSESMENT
Carmen Cordoba-Jabonero, JuanLuis Guerrero-Rascado, Daniel Toledo, María Parrondo, Margarita Yela, Manuel Gil, Héctor Ochoa
S9P-06MICRO PULSE LIDAR MEASUREMENTS FOR POLAR STRATOSPHERIC CLOUD MONITORING IN COASTAL ANTARCTICA. I. DEPOLARIZATION RATIO COMPARISON WITH CALIOP
Daniel Toledo, Carmen Córdoba-Jabonero, JuanLuis Guerrero-Rascado, María Parrondo, Margarita Yela, Manuel Gil, Héctor Ochoa
S9P-07THE INITIAL RESULTS OF GRAVITY WAVE MOMENTUM FLUX MEASURED BY A SODIUM TEMPERATURE/WIND LIDAR OVER HEFEI, CHINA
Tao Li, Xin Fang, Sheng-Yang Gu, Wei Liu, Qiurui Zhu, Chao Ban and Xiankang Dou
S9P-08LiDAR observations of middle atmospheric gravity wave activity over Reunion Island (20.8°S, 55.5°E): Climatological study
Vishnu Prasanth Parimisetty, Hassan Bencherif, V. Sivakumar, Phillipe Keckhut, Allain Hauchecorne and D. Narayana Rao
S9P-09LIDAR AND RADAR INVESTIGATION OF INERTIA GRAVITY WAVE INTRINSIC PROPERTIES AT McMURDO, ANTARCTICA
Cao Chen, Xinzhao Chu, Zhibin Yu, Weichun Fong, Adrian J. McDonald, Xian Lu, Wentao Huang
S9P-10STUDY OF PECULIARITIES IN STRATOSPHERIC WARMING OVER TOMSK AS JUDGED FROM LIDAR TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN 2009/2010
Gennady Matvienko, Valeriy Marichev
S9P-11TEMPERATURE PROFILES OBSERVED DURING AN UNUSUAL DEPLETION OF OZONE OVER NDACC STATION OF RÍO GALLEGOS (51° 55’S, 69° 14’W)-ARGENTINA ON NOVEMBER 2009
Jacobo Salvador, Elian Wolfram, Facundo Orte, Daniela Bulnes, Sophie Godin-Beekmann, Eduardo Quel
S9P-12VERTICAL RESOLUTION EVALUATION IN OZONE DIAL MEASUREMENTS
Pablo Facundo Orte, Jacobo Omar Salvador, Elian Augusto Wolfram, Raul Luis D'Elia, Claudio Casiccia, Felix Zamorano, Eduardo Jaime Quel
S9P-13DIAL-SONDE OZONE PROFILES INTERCOMPARISON CAMPAIGN AT RÍO GALLEGOS, ARGENTINA
Elian Wolfram, Jacobo Salvador, Raul D'Elia, Claudio Casiccia, Felix Zamorano Banda, Osiris Sofia, Eduardo Jaime Quel
S9P-14COMPARISON BETWEEN LIDAR AND MAX-DOAS MEASUREMENTS OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE PROFILES AND TROPOSPHERIC COLUMNS
Stijn Berkhout, T. Vlemmix, A.J.M. Piters, G.R. Van der Hoff
S9P-15SIMULTANEOUS AND COMMON-VOLUME LIDAR OBSERVATIONS OF THE MESOSPHERIC FE AND NA LAYERS AT BOULDER (40°N, 105°W)
Wentao Huang, Xinzhao Chu, Zhangjun Wang, Weichun Fong, Zhibin Yu, John A. Smith, Brendan Roberts

S9P-16SODIUM LAYER OBSERVATION DURING THE TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE OF 22ND JULY, 2009
Yang Yong, Wang Jihong, Cheng Xuewu, Li Faquan, Lin Xin, Gong Wei
S9P-17RECENT PBL INVESTIGATIONS IN IASI CITY AREA USING THE UPGRADED ESYRO LIDAR
Ovidiu-Gelu Tudose, Radu Hertanu, Olivier Couach, Ioan Balin
S9P-18RAYLEIGH RAMAN LIDAR SYSTEM CAPABLE FOR TROPOSPHERIC TO MESOSPHERIC OBSERVATION AT SYOWA STATION, ANTARCTICA
Hidehiko Suzuki, Takuji Nakamura, Mitsumu K. Ejiri , Makoto Abo, Takuya D. Kawahara, Yoshihiro Tomikawa, Masaki Tsutsumi
S9P-19MAIDO FACILITY AT REUNION ISLAND: LIDAR DEVELOPMENTS FOR UTLS SUBTROPICAL INVESTIGATIONS
Jean-Luc Baray, Yann Courcoux, Philippe Keckhut, Christophe Hoareau, Jacques Porteneuve, Robert Delmas, Gaelle Clain, Valentin Duflot, Franck Gabarrot, Gérard Ancellet
S9P-20NA LIDAR INVESTIGATION OF MID-LATITUDE SPORADIC E LAYER DETECTED BY CADI IONOSONDE AT LOGAN, UT (41.7°N, 111.8°W)
Tao Yuan, Jan Sojka, Chad Fish, Michael Taylor, Donald Rice, Nicholas Mitchell
S9P-21A SODIUM LIDAR TO MEASURE MESOPAUSE REGION WIND AND TEMPERTURE AT LANGFANG OBSERVATORY (39.4°N, 116.6°E)
Xiong Hu, Zhaoai Yan, Shangyong Guo, Yongqiang Cheng, Jiancun Gong
S9P-22DURBAN LIDAR FOR ATMOSPHERIC STUDIES-CURRENT STATUS
Venkataraman Sivakumar, Nkanyiso Mbatha, Hassan Bencherif, Philippe Keckhut












DAY-5 Friday 29 June 2012
08:30-10:30REGISTRATION08:30-13:30ORAL PRESENTATIONSSESSION 8O : Boundary Layer - MeteorologyCo-Chairs: Jacques Pelon, Valentin Simeonov
S8O-01
08:30-09:00

The atmospheric boundary layer: one way that lidar observations can improve our understanding (INVITED)
Edwin Eloranta
S8O-02
09:00-09:15
MOBILE LIDARS FOR CLIMATE, AIR QUALITY AND WIND ENERGY RESEARCH
Robert Michael Hardesty, Raul J. Alvarez II, Robert M. Banta, William Alan Brewer, James H. Churnside, Andrew O. Langford, Richard D. Marchbanks, Brandi J. McCarty, Yelena L. Pichugina, Scott P. Sandberg, Christoph J. Senff, Ann M. Weickmann
S8O-03
09:15-09:30On the Interaction of Tropospheric Gravity Waves and Boundary Layer Linear Convective Features: Cloud Streets
Samuel Harvey Melfi, Stephen Palm
S8O-04
09:30-09:45COMPARISONS OF PBL-HEIGHT MEASUREMENTS BY CALIOP/CALIPSO, RADIOSONDE AND GROUND-BASED LIDAR
Yonghua Wu, Lina Cordero, Barry M Gross, Fred Moshary, Sam A Ahmed
SESSION 9O : Lower/Middle/Upper Atmosphere-Physics-Chemistry-TransportCo-Chairs: Kohei Mizutani, Xinzhao Chu
S9O-01
09:45-10:15
TEMPERATURE TRENDS IN THE MIDDLE ATMOSPHERE AND THE ROLE OF THE DYNAMICS (INVITED)
Philippe Keckhut, Guillaume Angot, Alain Hauchecorne, Beatrix Funatsu, Chantal Claud
S9O-02
10:15-10:30Arctic Versus Midlatitude Ice Clouds: Differences Revealed by Ground-Based Lidar and CALIPSO Probing
Kenneth Sassen, Vinay K. Kayetha
10:30-11:00COFFEE BREAKCo-Chairs: Scott Spuler, Anne Garnier
S9O-03
11:00-11:30
Long-Term Lidar Measurements at Table Mountain, CA, and Mauna Loa, HI, for the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) (INVITED)
Stuart McDermid, Thierry Leblanc, Guillaume Kirgis, Daniel Walsh
S9O-04
11:30-11:45Possible linkage between tropospheric and Polar Stratospheric clouds observed by space-borne lidar in the Arctic?
Peggy Achtert, M. Karlsson Andersson, Farahnaz Khosrawi, Jörg Gumbel



S9O-05
11:45-12:00LIDAR MEASUREMENTS OF ARCTIC BOUNDARY LAYER OZONE DEPLETION EVENTS OVER THE FROZEN ARCTIC OCEAN
Jeffery A Seabrook, Jim Whiteway, Leonce Komguem, Ralf Staebler, Jan Bottenheim
S9O-06
12:00-12:15Simultaneous Measurements of Free Tropospheric Water Vapor and Ozone
Hannes Vogelmann, Thomas Trickl
S9O-07
12:15-12:30DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF AN AIRBORNE DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION LIDAR FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF OZONE AND WATER VAPOR IN THE TROPOPAUSE REGION
Felix Steinebach, Andreas Fix, Martin Wirth, Gerhard Ehret
S9O-08
12:30-12:45CHARACTERIZING POLLUTION TRANSPORT IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA USING AIRBORNE LIDAR MEASUREMENTS OF OZONE AND WIND PROFILES
Christoph J. Senff, Raul J. Alvarez II, W. Alan Brewer, R. Michael Hardesty, Andrew O. Langford, Robert M. Banta, Fay Davies, Guy N. Pearson, Scott P. Sandberg, Richard D. Marchbanks, Ann M. Weickmann
S9O-09
12:45-13:00LONG-TERM OBSERVATIONS OF THE NABRO STRATOSPHERIC AEROSOL LAYER OVER ÉVORA, PORTUGAL
Frank Wagner, Jana Preißler, Sergio Pereira, Juan Luis Guerrero-Rascado
S9O-10
13:00-13:15Statistical characteristics of atmospheric gravity wave in the mesopause region observed with a sodium LIDAR at Beijing, China
Guotao Yang, Shaohua Gong, Jihong Wang, Jiyao Xu, Sai Guan, Xiaoxi Zhang
S9O-11
13:15-13:30McMURDO LIDAR CAMPAIGN: A NEW LOOK INTO POLAR UPPER ATMOSPHERE
Xinzhao Chu, Zhibin Yu, Weichun Fong, Cao Chen, Weichun Fong, Wentao Huang, Zhangjun Wang, Brendan Roberts, John A. Smith, Chester S. Gardner
13:30-14:30LUNCH BREAK
14:30-15:30
AWARDS and CLOSING CEREMONY 
Monday, 25 June 2012

Oral Presentations 08:30-18:20


Keynote Talk


Laser Remote Sensing:
from Environmental to Medical Applications
Sune Svanberg
Physics Department and Lund Laser Centre, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00, Lund, Sweden
and
Center for Optical and Electromagnetic Research, South China Normal University, University City Campus, 510006, Guangzhou, China
Laser spectroscopic techniques have brought about a revolution in fundamental sciences as well as in numerous application fields. High spectral and temporal resolution, high specificity and sensitivity, noninvasiveness, and data delivery in near real-time are all extremely attractive features of applied laser spectroscopy. Non-intrusiveness can be seen as a remote sensing feature, where the sounding distance is sometimes long - typically kilometers in normal lidar applications, but sometimes much shorter (meters) in, e.g. combustion diagnostics, or just centimeters in medical diagnostics. Lidar approaches in common language include elastic backscattering, Raman, fluorescence, laser-induced breakdown and laser plasma channeling varieties, and have produced a host of valuable environmental data ranging from upper atmosphere ozone depletion and industrial pollution fluxes, to façade deterioration of historical buildings. Recently, fluorescence lidar techniques were extended to the monitoring of insects and migrating birds. Shorter range lidar can be used for probing large industrial burners. The biophotonics field is a large emerging area where lidar-like approaches have become very abundant. Human tissue is characterized by strong scattering similar to the one typical in dense clouds. Optical mammography, fluorescence imaging of cancer tumours, and laser Doppler imaging of flow, all have their counterparts in the large-scale lidar field. The parallel between the environmental and medical fields becomes almost perfect in the case of Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy (GASMAS), where free gas in pores, surrounded by a solid or liquid host material is probed similarly as in differential absorption lidar.





















Session 1O
Lidar Technologies and Methods
Co-Chairs: Alexandros Papayannis, Pierre Flamant, Robert Menzies, Geary Schwemmer, Gelsomina Pappalardo, Arnoud Apituley

S1O-01 - Invited Talk

Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development at NASA Langley Research Center for NASA Space-based 3-D Winds Mission
Upendra N. Singh, Michael J. Kavaya, Jirong Yu, Mulugeta Petros, and Grady J. Koch
NASA Langley Research Center, MS 433, Hampton, VA, USA
We review the 20-plus years of pulsed transmit laser development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to enable a coherent Doppler wind lidar to measure global winds from earth orbit. We briefly also discuss the many other ingredients needed to prepare for this space mission.
S1O-02
2-MICRON LASERS FOR CO2 AND WIND MEASUREMENTS
Kohei Mizutani1, Shoken Ishii1, Motoaki Yasui1, Toshikazu Itabe1, Atsushi Sato2, Kazuhiro Asai2, Hirotake Fukuoka3, Takashi Katai3, Takayoshi Ishikawa4, Teiji Kase5
1National Institute of Information & Communications Technology, Koganei, Tokyo, Japan
2Tohoku Institute of Technology, 35-1 Yagiyama kasum-cho, Taihaku-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 982-8577, Japan
3Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1-8-3 shinmiyakoda, kita-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-2103, Japan
4Nippon Aleph Co., 1-28-52 Komaoka, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0071, Japan
5NEC Co., 1-10 Nisshin-cho, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8501, Japan
We are developing 2-micron conductive-cooled lasers for CO2 and wind measurements. One type of lasers is Tm,Ho:YLF laser operated at 20-40 Hz. The laser rod is cooled down to -80oC in a vacuum container. Ho:YLF laser pumped by Tm:fiber laser is another type which will be operated at high repetition rate of 200-300 Hz in normal temperature. These lasers emit at 2.05-micron and are used for observations of wind profiles and CO2 concentrations. The lasers are conductive-cooled, solid state and eye-safe. Then, these are suitable for space applications.
S1O-03
2-MICRON HIGH-REPETITION RATE LASER TRANSMITTER FOR CO2
AND WIND LIDAR (COWI)
Dimitri Edouart, Fabien Gibert, Florian Le Mounier, Claire Cénac, Pierre Flamant
Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, IPSL/CNRS École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau, France
We describe the development of a new high repetition rate laser for a Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (CDiAL). This new system is designed to conduct atmospheric CO2 monitoring above a sequestration site in the framework of carbon capture and storage experiment. The pulsed 2 µm Ho:YLF ring laser is pumped by a CW Tm:fiber laser at 1940 nm. The cavity is sequentially seeded by two optically amplified DFBs using a 2 µm fibered switch. Due to the high repetition rate operation, the Pound Drever Hall (PDH) technique is preferred to get a single mode operation of the seeded and Q-switched power oscillator. First two DFBs seeding operation around 2051 nm are reported with ~96 % of seeding efficiency and 2 MHz of frequency standard deviation.


S1O-04 - Invited Talk
MERLIN: a French-German mission addressing methane monitoring
by lidar from space
Pierre H. Flamant1, Gerhard Ehret2, Bruno Millet3, and Matthias Alpers4
1Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, IPSL/CNRS École Polytechnique 91128, Palaiseau, France
2Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofe, 82234 Weßling, Germany
3Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales, 18 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31401 Toulouse Cedex 9, France
4Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Königswinterer Str. 522-524, 53227 Bonn, Germany
MERLIN is a new space borne lidar mission dedicated to methane (CH4). The name stands for “MEthane Remote sensing LIdar MissioN”. MERLIN has been initiated in late 2009 in Franco-German cooperation after the Copenhagen conference. MERLIN is a space borne Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar for global observation of column-weighted dry-air mixing ratio of CH4 in a nadir pointing configuration. Methane is the second anthropogenic atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) after CO2. It has a lower mean concentration than CO2 (1.7 ppm vs 380 ppm) but it has a larger radiation forcing potential (x23). Accurate knowledge of concentrations and fluxes of CH4 are an issue for current climate change research. CH4 is also a key player in atmospheric chemistry. MERLIN is challenging in many respect according to its scientific objective: global coverage, high accuracy on column-weighted dry-air mixing ratio with no bias; and its technical objective: to flight an advanced IPDA OPO-OPA lidar on a micro satellite platform. In this paper, we present the status of the MERLIN project at the end of phase A in mid-2012.
S1O-05
A DIRECT DETECTION 16 µM DIAL WITH THREE WAVELENGTHS FOR HIGH ACCURATE MEASUREMENTS OF VERTICAL CO2 PROFILES IN THE TROPOSPHERE
Chikao Nagasawa1, Makoto Abo1, Yasukuni Shibata1, Tomohiro Nagai2, Tetsu Sakai2 and Makoto Tsukamoto3
1Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino, Tokyo 191-0065, Japan
2Meteorological Research Institute, 1-1 Nagamine, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0052, Japan
3Eco Instruments Corporation, 1-21-8, Hatagaya, Shibuya, Tokyo 151-0072, Japan
Inverse techniques using atmospheric transport models are developed to estimate the carbon dioxide (CO2) sources and sinks based on the observed data. The accurate vertical CO2 profiles in the troposphere are highly desirable in the inverse techniques to improve quantification and understanding of the global budget of CO2 and also global climate changes. In comparison with the ground-based monitoring network, CO2 measurements for vertical profiles in the troposphere have been limited to campaign-style aircraft and commercial airline observations with the limited spatial and temporal coverage. We have developed a direct detection 1.6 ¼m differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to perform range-resolved measurements of vertical CO2 concentration profiles in the atmosphere. Our 1.6 ¼m DIAL system consists of the Optical Parametric Generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd:YAG laser with high repetition rate (500 Hz) and the receiving optics that included the near infrared photomultiplier tube with high quantum efficiency operating at the photon counting mode and the telescope with larger aperture than that of the coherent detection method. This 1.6 ¼m DIAL system is also available to measure the vertical CO2 concentration profiles for daytime by using narrowband interference filters. We report the new 1.6 ¼m DIAL system that can measure simultaneously the temperature profiles with the CO2 concentration profiles in the atmosphere because of improvement of the CO2 density and mixing ratio (ppm) measurement accuracy.


S1O-06
DEVELOPMENT OF RAMAN LIDAR FOR WATER DISSOLVED CO2 DETECTION
Toshihiro Somekawa1 and Masayuki Fujita1,2
1Insutitute for Laser Technology, 2-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
2Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
We demonstrated the range-resolved detection and identification of CO2 dissolved in water by Raman lidar. A frequency doubled Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) is used as the lidar light source, and the Raman signals at ~571 and ~574 nm from CO2 dissolved in water were detected. In lidar application, CO2 dissolved in water was identified in glass bottles 20 m away by using the CO2 Raman band at ~574 nm.
S1O-07
Evaluation of an obscurant-penetrating 3D-imaging lidar in whiteout conditions
Simon Roy1, Xiaoying Cao2, Gilles Roy1, Evan Trickey2
1DRDC Valcartier, 2459, Pie-XI Blvd North, Quebec, Quebec, G3J 1X5, Canada
2Neptec Design Group Ltd., 302 Legget Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K2K 1Y5, Canada
DRDC Valcartier is currently evaluating the Obscurant Penetrating Autosynchronous Lidar (OPAL) developed by Neptec Design Group Ltd. This sensor is targeted at supporting rotary-wing aircraft operating in degraded visual environments (DVE) during critical flight phases (i.e. take-off and landing). OPAL consists of a scanning pulsed lidar that generates 3D images of hard targets engulfed in obscurant clouds. The sensor performance evaluation study is conducted in three phases. Phase I focused on acquiring knowledge on brownout and whiteout phenomenologies, and on defining proper testing conditions and performance metrics for Phase II. Phase II will aim at quantifying the sensor see-through capability as a function of optical depth and target reflectivity. Phase III will consist of in-flight validation trials. This paper presents Phase I preliminary results for whiteout conditions obtained during winter field trials.
S1O-08
Data Analysis of 3-Dimensional Water Vapor Fields Measured with the UHOH DIAL System
Florian Späth, Andreas Behrendt, Volker Wulfmeyer
University of Hohenheim, Institute of Physics and Meteorology, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
The water vapor (WV) differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) is able to measure 3-dimensional WV fields. To reach high resolution, a high power injection seeded Ti:Sapphire laser with 250 Hz and a 80-cm scanning telescope are used. Measurements at atmospheric conditions with high aerosol gradients require a correction for the Doppler broadening of the Rayleigh backscatter line profile. The UHOH data retrieval includes Rayleigh-Doppler correction and reaches an accuracy of better than 5%. In this contribution, we discuss the data analysis scheme of the UHOH DIAL and illustrate the performance of the data with measurement examples.
S1O-09
Polarization Configuration of the GV-HSRL for detection of horizontally oriented ice crystals
Matthew Hayman1, Scott Spuler2, Bruce Morely2, Joseph VanAndel2
1Advanced Studies Program, National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO, 80307, USA
2Earth Observing Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO, 80307, USA
Horizontally oriented ice crystals are known to have different polarization properties than their randomly oriented counterparts. We describe here the theoretical basis and implementation of polarization measurements on the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Gulf Stream V-High Spectral Resolution Lidar (GV-HSRL) for the purpose of identifying and studying ice crystal orientation. The lidar is modified to perform multiple independent polarization measurements to fully measure the backscatter phase matrix. This enhances existing aerosol characterization capabilities, eliminates ambiguity in interpretation of the lidar’s polarization data products, and further expands the field of polarization lidar techniques. We recognize that polarization measurements are intrinsically dependent on both the polarizations incident and measured by the instrument. Therefore, by characterizing an imperfect instrument, we are able to relate the scattering matrix elements to detected photon counts through a measurement matrix. The full scattering matrix can then be retrieved from the recorded photon counts by inverting the measurement matrix.
S1O-10
FRAUNHOFER LIDAR IN THE GREEN BAND FOR DAYTIME PHOTON COUNTING
Songhua Wu, Shengguang Qin, Xiaoquan Song, Bingyi Liu, Wei Zhang, Lei Jin, Huaming Hou
Ocean Remote Sensing Institute, Ocean University of China, No.5 Yushan Road, Qingdao 266003,
China
Lidar uses photon counting technology to capture the extremely weak backscatters from long distance by a long time accumulation. Because of the strong solar background, the signal-to-noise ratio of lidar in the daytime could be greatly restricted, especially for the lidar operating at visible band where solar background is prominent. Narrow band-pass filters must therefore be installed in order to isolate solar background noise at wavelengths close to that of the lidar receiving channel, whereas the background light in superposition with signal spectrum limits an effective margin for SNR improvement. This work proposes a prototype lidar operating at the solar Fraunhofer lines in the green band to achieve photon counting under intense solar background. The laser transmitter is an optical parametric oscillator laser and is tuned to the dark line by the Magnesium atom of the solar atmosphere by which nearly 90% of solar radiation is absorbed. A grating based spectrograph is used as a high resolution receiver. The prototype provides theoretical references for an optimized design of photon counting lidar in the green band with a SNR comparable to that at night, which contributes to the research on diurnal variation of the atmosphere and to the operational observation of high spectral resolution lidar.
S1O-11
Comparison of High-Spectral-Resolution Lidar with Raman Lidar
Dietrich Althausen1, Peter Oelsner1,2,3, Axel Rohmer1, Holger Baars1
1Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, 04318 Leipzig, Permoserstr. 15, Germany
2University of Leipzig, Institute for Meteorology, Leipzig, Germany
3German National Meteorological Service, Department for Aeronautical Meteorology, Leipzig, Germany
A high-spectral resolution (HSR) channel and a Raman channel were incorporated into one lidar system and directly compared. The comparison shows a better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the HSR signal and thus the advantage of the HSR method for daytime measurements. Due to a non-perfect light suppression of the particle signal by an iodine cell within the receiver unit, an additional parameter needs to be introduced in the equations for the detailed HSR analysis. As a result, a SNR of e" 10 is necessary for the determination of the particle backscatter and extinction coefficients by the HSR method, while for the Raman method a SNR of e" 3 is sufficient. An example measurement of cirrus clouds shows a good agreement between the two methods during night-time and reasonable results with the HSR method during daytime.
S1O-12
VERTICAL VERSUS SCANNING LIDAR MEASUREMENTS IN HORIZONTAL HOMOGENEOUS ATMOSPHERE
Marianna Adam1,2
1European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Ispra, 21027, Italy
2Curently: no affiliation, adammariana@gmail.com
The study is aimed to compare the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients as retrieved from vertical elastic and Raman channels with those derived from multi-angle measurements acquired by elastic channels. Simulated vertical signals at 355 nm, 387 nm, 532 nm and 607 nm are employed. For multi-angle measurements, records at 15 elevation angles are simulated at 355 nm and 532 nm. The atmosphere is considered horizontally homogeneous. For backscatter coefficient, the aerosol backscatter ratio solution and the multi-angle solution are considered. For extinction coefficient, the retrievals from Raman channel and from multi-angle measurements are compared. The comparison shows that in the presence of horizontal homogeneity, multi-angle measurements provide more reliable results. The uncertainty in the measured signals is considered in an alternative approach to quantify the relative error of the retrieved profiles with respect to the models (linear regression between retrieval and model).
S1O-13
Atmospheric temperature measurement by spontaneous Rayleigh- Brillouin scattering for airborne applications
Hamza Alami, Patrick Feneyrou, Grégoire Pillet
Thales Research & Technology, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex, France
We present here a novel optical system allowing the measurement of flight parameters (especially temperature, with a desired precision of 1 K at 300 K) for an implementation along with classic probes in order to allow a better efficiency (asymmetric redundancy) and reduced power consumption. The principle underlying the measurement is the analysis of the optical signal resulting from spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering at short range (typically one meter from the fuselage) in near forward scattering in the infrared domain, thus ensuring eye-safety. In this paper, we give a summary on spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering and its use in temperature measurements. Then, we derive the specifications that a bistatic lidar should meet in order to achieve such a measurement. We also present a novel noise-reduction system that we developed to get rid of the laser noise at low frequencies. Finally, we assess the sensitivity of the system and present our first results for such an application.
S1O-14
AN INSTRUMENT FOR ACCURATE MEASUREMENT OF RAYLEIGH-BRILLOUIN SCATTERING PROFILES AROUND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS
Ziyu Gu, M. Ofelia Vieitez, Eric-Jan van Duijn, Wim Ubachs
Institute for Lasers, Life and BioPhotonics, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
A spectrometer for the measurement of spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering line proûles at ultraviolet wavelengths fromgas phase molecules has been developed, employing a high-power frequency-stabilized UV-laser with narrow bandwidth. The design of the RB-scattering cell allows for measurements atgas pressures in the range 0-4 bar and at stably controlled temperatures from -30 oC to 70 oC. The measurements demonstrate the high signal-to-noise ratio achievable with the instrument, at the 1% level at the peak amplitude of the scattering proûle. Measurements were performed on N2 and air atvarious pressures and temperatures. The results are of relevance for several lidar instruments, including the future spaceborne lidar missions ADM-Aeolus and EarthCARE.
S1O-15
UV RAMAN LIDAR AND SIDE SCATTERING DETECTOR FOR THE MONITORING OF AEROSOL OPTICAL TRANSMISSION AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY
Vincenzo Rizi4, for the Pierre Auger Collaboration2, Adam Botts1, Clint Allen1, Michael Calhoun1, Bryce Carande1, Michael Coco1,5, John Claus1, Lucas Emmert1, Levi Hamilton1, TJ Heid1, Fabian Honecker1,3, Marco Iarlori4, Sarah Morgan1, Shay Robinson1, David Starbuck1, John Sherman1, Michael Wakin5, Orlen Wolf1
1Colorado School of Mines, Department of Physics, 1523 Illinois St., Golden CO, USA
2Observatorio Pierre Auger, Malargue, ASMN No. 304, Argentina
3Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
4CETEMPS and INFN, Dep. di Fisica Università Degli Studi dell’Aquila, 67010 L’Aquila, Italy
5Colorado School of Mines, Division of Engineering, 1500 Illinois St., Golden CO, USA
(Full author list: http://www.auger.org/archive/authors 2011 05.html)
Atmospheric conditions are important for the performances of the Pierre Auger Observatory that uses the atmosphere as a giant calorimeter, for this reason an R&D system was setup in Colorado. This system combines a Raman backscatter lidar receiver with a calibrated pulsed UV laser system to generate a test beam in which the number of photons in the beam can be determined at ground level and as a function of height in the atmosphere. The data have been recorded simultaneously by the Raman receiver and by a single mirror optical (cosmic rays) detector that measures the side-scattered laser light across a horizontal distance of 39 km. The new test beam instrument has taken measurements (data accumulated for 938 hours by Raman lidar, and 252 hours of coincident observations of Raman receiver and side scattering detector) from September 2010 to June 2011, and it will be moved from the R&D location in southeast Colorado to the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina to effect a major upgrade of the Central Laser Facility near the center of the Observatory.
S1O-16
ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LIDAR SENSITIVITY AND TENDENCIES OF GEOPHYSICAL TIME SERIES
Jens Fiedler and G. Baumgarten
Leibniz Institute of Atmospheric Physics at the Rostock University, Schloss-Str. 6, 18225 Kühlungsborn, Germany
Weather conditions as well as system performance impact the signal quality of middle atmosphere lidars, which may bias time series obtained from long-term observations. We investigate this topic using a noctilucent cloud (NLC) data set collected by the Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the ALOMAR research facility in Northern Norway (69.3 N, 16.0 E). Both signal and background show pronounced year-to-year variations which are attributed to technical changes at lidar detector and daylight filter. Replacing photomultiplier tubes by avalanche photodiodes caused a signal increase by factor ~4.5 and exchanging the Fabry-Perot etalons resulted into signal doubling. We find the signal-to-error ratio S/”S rather than the signal-to-background ratio S/B to be an important measure for the lidar sensitivity. Our NLC time series started 1997 and contains ~2090 hours with cloud detections, 45% of them are impacted by the signal quality to some degree. Slopes of time series for the NLC occurrence frequency differ by factor of ~4, depending on data limitations, which is attributed to the lidar sensitivity. Taking these effects into account leads to reliable analysis of long-term data sets.
S1O-17
ARLEM: A MONTE-CARLO-BASED RETRIEVAL ALGORITHM FOR WIDE FOV LIDAR SYSTEMS
Robert Buras and Josef Gasteiger
Lehrstuhl für Experimentelle Meteorologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 München, Germany
We have developed the lidar retrieval algorithm ARLEM (MYSTIC-based Exact Lidar Retrieval Algorithm) in order to test possible future configurations of complex lidar systems. We set special emphasis on the possible extension of existing lidar systems, e.g. the MUltiplewavelegth LIdar System (MULIS) of the University of Munich, with wide-field-of-view detectors. Our approach is different from most other retrieval algorithms in the sense that we retrieve the microphysical properties of e.g. aerosols directly, instead of retrieving the optical properties. The algorithm is based on the iterative Levenberg-Marquardt method, the forward model of choice is the Monte Carlo radiative transfer solver MYSTIC. Latter is capable of providing the retrieval algorithm with both the lidar signal and the Jacobian for any type of detector channel, be it a Raman, cross-polarized, wide-field-of view (WFOV), etc. channel. To this end, MYSTIC has been equipped with unique variance reduction methods, with newly developed equations for calculating the Jacobians for polarized, multiple scattered laser light, and with the possibility to calculate the Jacobians for an arbitrary number of parameters. The functionality of ARLEM was tested on showing whether a WFOV detector extension to MULIS could help improve aerosol retrieval. ARLEM can be used to find out which extensions to existing lidar systems bring the largest gain on information about atmospheric parameters.
S1O-18
Meteoritic Smoke in the Upper Stratosphere: Implications for Backscatter Lidar Inferred From Lidar Observations and Global Aerosol Microphysical Modeling
Ryan R. Neely III1, Jeffrey P. Thayer2, R. Michael Hardesty3, Owen B. Toon4, Susan Solomon5
1NOAA/ESRL, CIRES and the University of Colorado, Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Boulder, CO, 80309, USA
2University of Colorado, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, Boulder, CO, 80309, USA
3NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Boulder, CO 80305 USA
4LASP and the University of Colorado, Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Boulder, CO, 80309, USA
5Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
Recent optical observations of aerosols in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere have shown significant amounts of extinction at altitudes above ~40 km, where the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer ends. Modeling of this region reveals that meteoritic smoke settling from the mesosphere and its interaction with the upper part of the sulfate aerosol layer is the origin of the observed extinction. We compare observations from the SAGE II satellite and from NOAA’s lidar located at Mauna Loa, Hawaii to extinction profiles derived from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) coupled with the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for atmospheres (CARMA). Our results show that a major source of extinction exists in the region above ~30 km that must be addressed by lidars and other remote sensing instruments. Such instruments have traditionally assumed the stratosphere above about 30 km to be an aerosol free region to estimate the molecular component of their observation. This additional stratospheric aerosol contribution must be addressed to accurately assess the amount of extinction and its role in the global radiative budget.





Session 2O
Networking – Forecast Models
Co-Chairs: Raymond Hoff, Frank Wagner
S2O-01 - Invited Talk

Integrated Aerosol Observing System
Gelsomina Pappalardo
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto di Metodologie per l’Analisi Ambientale (CNR-IMAA), C. da S. Loja, Tito Scalo, 85050 Potenza, Italy
Aerosol impact on climate is one of the most uncertain aspects of climate change, and impact of aerosols on human health is a growing matter of concern, particularly in urban areas. There is a need to develop an integrated approach of characterizing particles by including ground-level and airborne in-situ measurements, ground-based remote sensing, and space-borne observations in combination with advanced modelling. The main goal is to establish an integrated observing system that should foster aerosol-related process studies, validation of satellite sensors, model development and evaluation, assimilation of aerosol data into operational models, and build comprehensive aerosol climatology on a global scale.
S2O-02
LIDAR COMMUNITY IN LATIN AMERICA:
A DECADE OF CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES
Juan Carlos Antuña1, Eduardo Landulfo2, Barclay Clemesha3, Francesco Zaratti4, Eduardo Quel5, Alvaro Bastidas6, Rene Estevan1 and Boris Barja1
1Grupo de Óptica Atmosférica de Camagüey, Instituto de Meteorología, Camagüey, Cuba,
2Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear, IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brasil,
3Upper Atmosphere Research Group, FISAT, INPE, Brasil,
4Laboratorio de Física de la Atmósfera, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, La Paz, Bolivia,
5CEILAP-UNIDEF (MINDEF-CONICET) - UMI-IFAECI-CNRS 3351, Buenos Aires, Argentina
6Grupo de Investigación en Láseres y Espectroscopia, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Medellín, Medellín, Colombia
A retrospective view of the build-up and evolution of the lidar community in Latin America is presented. Regular workshops providing exchange opportunities between Latin American lidar teams and facilitating contacts worldwide are highlighted. Sustained by an informal agreement between the leaders of a small number of initial lidar teams, its formalization is still pending. The contribution of the international community in helping to maintain the workshops every two years, leading to the development of local scientific capacities and the publication of the papers presented is noteworthy. Clear and precise goals have been maintained throughout the years, guaranteeing success. Efforts have been dedicated to capacity building mainly with the pre-workshop courses. Exchanges of students and scientists in the region and with the rest of the world contribute to increasing local lidar scientific expertise. The increase from 5 lidar teams and 3 prospective sites in 2001 to 9 teams, with 3 sites building lidars and 3 more in the design phase by 2011 demonstrate the results. Two of the new sites in 2011 are directly linked to agreements reached at the workshops. This has been an endeavor conducted by Latin-American scientists with the valuable assistance of the international lidar community. Records of all the six workshops held so far are available at a website.



S2O-03
STANDARDIZATION OF THE DEFINITIONS OF VERTICAL RESOLUTION AND UNCERTAINTY IN THE NDACC-ARCHIVED OZONE AND TEMPERATURE LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Thierry Leblanc1, Sophie Godin-Beekmann2, Guillaume Payen2, Franck Gabarrot3, Anne van Gijsel4, Justin Bandoro5, Robert Sica6 and Thomas Trickl7
1California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Wrightwood, CA, 92397, USA
2LATMOS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France
3LACy, Université de La Reunion, St Denis, France
4KNMI, De Bilt, The Netherlands
5University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
6Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, IMK-IFU, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany
The international Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) is a global network of high-quality, remote-sensing research stations for observing and understanding the physical and chemical state of the Earth atmosphere. As part of NDACC, over 20 ground-based lidar instruments are dedicated to the long-term monitoring of atmospheric composition and to the validation of space-borne measurements of the atmosphere from environmental satellites such as Aura and ENVISAT. One caveat of large networks such as NDACC is the difficulty to archive measurement and analysis information consistently from one research group (or instrument) to another. Yet the need for consistent definitions has strengthened as datasets of various origin (e.g., satellite and ground-based) are increasingly used for inter- comparisons, validation, and ingested together in global assimilation systems. In the framework of the 2010 Call for Proposals by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) located in Bern, Switzerland, a Team of lidar experts was created to address existing issues in three critical aspects of the NDACC lidar ozone and temperature data retrievals: signal filtering and the vertical filtering of the retrieved profiles, the quantification and propagation of the uncertainties, and the consistent definition and reporting of filtering and uncertainties in the NDACC-archived products. Additional experts from the satellite and global data standards communities complement the team to help address issues specific to the latter aspect.
S2O-04
EARLINET SINGLE CALCULUS CHAIN FOR AUTOMATIC LIDAR DATA PROCESSING: FIRST TESTS ON OPTICAL PRODUCTS
Giuseppe D’Amico1, Ioannis Binietoglou1, Aldo Amodeo1, Gelsomina Pappalardo1, Holger Baars2, Ronny Engelmann2, UllaWandinger2, Ina Mattis3, Volker Freudenthaler4, Matthias Wiegner4, Doina Nicolae5, Anatoli Chaikovsky6, Arnoud Apituley7, Mariana Adam8
1Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Metodologie per l’Analisi Ambientale (CNR-IMAA), Tito Scalo, Potenza, Italy
2Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig, Germany
3Deutscher Wetterdienst, Meteorologisches Observatorium Hohenpeißenberg, Germany, E-mail:
4Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany
5National Institute of R&D for Optoelectronics, Remote Sensing Dept., Bucharest, Romania
6Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Minsk, Belarus
7The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt, The Netherlands
8European Commission - JRC Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra, Italy
Within the EARLINET-ASOS (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network - Advanced Sustainable Observation System) project great importance was given to the optimization of lidar data processing. The main goal was to develop a common processing chain (the Single Calculus Chain - SCC) to get atmospheric aerosol products from raw lidar data in an automatic way and without the need for operator interaction. The data from all EARLINET lidar systems can be analyzed with the SCC producing homogeneous and quality-assured products. The SCC was already tested successfully with synthetic lidar signals used for the EARLINET algorithm inter-comparison exercise. In this work we present the first tests of the SCC on real lidar data. In particular data from EARLI09 (EARlinet Lidar Inter-comparison) have been used to compare SCC results with the analysis made by the analysis software developed by each EARLINET group individually. SCC retrievals for elastic and Raman aerosol backscatter and for aerosol extinction have been compared obtaining a good agreement.

S2O-05 - Invited Talk

ASSIMILATION OF LIDAR OBSERVATIONS IN AEROSOL TRANSPORT MODELS
Nobuo Sugimoto
National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 Japan
The use of lidar data in assimilation of aerosol transport models is discussed from the lidar observation point of view. Examples of assimilation of data from the ground-based lidar network (AD-Net) and the spaceborne lidar CALIPSO are introduced, and the optimum observations and data processing methods are discussed. A four-dimensional variational data assimilation system for a regional dust model was developed by Yumimoto et al. and applied to analysis of several Asian dust events using the AD-Net dust extinction coefficient data. It was demonstrated that the data assimilation method was useful not only for better reproducing the dust distribution but also for better estimating the dust emission in the source regions. A data assimilation system for a global aerosol model using a four-dimensional ensemble Kalman filter was developed by Sekiyama et al. and applied to CALIPSO data. It was also applied to AD-Net data. The attenuated backscatter coefficient and the volume depolarization ratio were used in the CALIPSO data assimilation successfully. In the assimilation of the ground-based lidars, however, the use of the dust extinction coefficient derived from the backscattering signals and the depolarization ratio was better, because it was difficult with the model to reproduce aerosol distributions in the lower altitudes.
S2O-06
Aerosol Lidar Profiling and Data Assimilation for Operational Global Mass Transport Modeling and Visibility Forecasting
James R. Campbell1, Jianglong Zhang2, Jeffrey S. Reid1, Douglas L. Westphal1, Walter R. Sessions3, Angela Benedetti4, Ellsworth J. Welton5
1Naval Research Laboratory, c/o 7 Grace Hopper Ave. Stop 2, Monterey, California, USA 93940
2Atmospheric Sciences Dept., University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA
3Computer Sciences Corporation, Monterey, CA, USA
4Chemical Aspects Section, ECMWF, Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom
5NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
This paper summarizes the growing application of global aerosol lidar measurements, both from land and space, used as data assimilation products and for skill evaluation of mass transport models used for enhanced weather and climate prediction. The pending launch of new satellite-based lidar systems capable of routine aerosol monitoring over the next six years, thus complimenting and extending the record compiled by the NASA CALIOP instrument, has brought the technology to the attention of modeling groups in need of range-resolved information on aerosol particle structure, thus complimenting the relatively widespread availability of passive two-dimensional aerosol datasets. Current and pending lidar data assimilation techniques, latency and value-added processing issues and their shortcomings, surface validation and ground networks used for model validation and the growing skill of algorithms designed for distinguishing speciation from space are described.
S2O-07
LIDAR OBSERVATION AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A SUMMER DUST STORM AND ITS ARC CLOUDS IN THE TAKLIMAKAN DESERT
Kenji Kai1, Hiroyuki Iwanaga2, Yoshitaka Jin1, Hongfei Zhou3
1Graduate School of Environmental Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan,
2Chuden CTI, Nagoya, Japan,
3Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
A strong easterly wind generated a dust storm with a gust front at 13:20 UTC on 7 August 2004 in the Taklimakan Desert, China. Coarse particles were lifted up by the strong wind, and fine particles showed a pre-peak just before the arrival of the dust storm. The visibility decreased to less than 1 km. The temperature dropped by 6 ºC and the relative humidity rose by 25% during the passage of the dust storm. The present study investigates the structure of this summer dust storm in the Taklimakan Desert both by intensive observations and a numerical simulation. The mechanism of the summertime dust storm is analogous to that for springtime ones. The strong easterly wind is explained as a gravity current of the inflow of a cold air mass. The jump in surface humidity is caused by a possible supply of moisture from evaporating precipitations falling out of an arc cloud over the head of the dust storm.




Monday, 25 June 2012

Poster Presentations 18:30-20:00

Session 1P
Lidar Technologies and Methods
Co-Chairs: Gennadii Matvienko, Volker Freudenthaler, Yingjiang Wang, Wei Heli
S1P-01
COMPACT MULTISPECTRAL SCATTERING PARTICLE ANALYZER (COMSPA) -DEVELOPMENT OF A SCATTER SENSOR FOR LIDAR CALIBRATION
Zuguang Guan, Michael Gausa, Sandra Blindheim, Arild Danielsen
ALOMAR Observatory, Andøya Rocket Range AS, 8483 Andenes, Norway
A compact multi-spectral scattering particle analyzer (COMSPA) is in development at ALOMAR lidar observatory for lidar signal calibration. The sensor measures scattering coefficients on multiple wave-lengths simultaneously. It is significantly simplified and optimized in design for the non-recoverable payload on small balloons, but also competitive in other applications for its high performance-to-cost ratio. A three-wavelength prototype was developed in the laboratory, and the feasibility was demonstrated through tracking an imitated pollution event indoor. The sensitivity is high enough to quantify the air-molecule induced scattering. COMSPA’s function will extend to multi-angular detection and depolarization analysis in the future models. Microphysical particle parameters will be retrieved from the diverse scattering properties obtained in in-situ measurement.
S1P-02
POLARIZATION EFFECTS INDUCED BY A TWO-MIRROR LIDAR BEAM STEERING UNIT
Scott Alexander Gimbal, Qiaochu Li, Anna Petrova-Mayor
California State University Chico, Department of Physics, 400 W. First St., Chico, CA 95929, USA
Experimental data on the polarization effects induced by a two-mirror beam scanner (or beam steering unit) are presented. We discuss the change in polarization resulting from two different coatings and for any combination of azimuth and elevation angle. A method to cancel the effect of the scanner’s mirrors so that the transmit polarization remains linear independent of the coating parameters and the pointing direction is suggested.
S1P-03
ON DISTORTION IN THE CHM15K CEILOMETER SIGNALS
Michal Piadlowski and Iwona S. Stachlewska
Institute of Geophysics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw (IGFUW), Pasteura 7, 02-093 Warsaw, Poland
Significant distortions present up to 255 m range in the Jenoptik’s CHM15K signals were identified via simple experiments at the Radiative Transfer Laboratory of the IGFUW, Warsaw, Poland.


S1P-04
A MORPHOLOGICAL FILTER FOR AIRBORNE LIDAR DATA CONSTRAINED
BY MULTI-GRADIENT
Yong LI
School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, Peoples Republic of China
The technology of airborne Light Detection And Ranging (lidar) provides a powerful support for acquiring 3D geospatial data. Lidar data filtering is still a challenging task whose aim is to separating ground and non-ground points efficiently, although recent years witnessed many kinds of filters developed. In this paper, a novel morphological filter for airborne lidar data constrained by multi-gradient is proposed. Firstly, point clouds are organized by an index mesh. Then, the multi-gradient of each point is calculated using the morphological method. And, objects are removed gradually by choosing some points to carry on an improved opening operation constrained by multi-gradient iteratively. This method is tested with the sample data sets released by ISPRS which are representative of different environments. The experimental results show that this method can separate ground and non-ground points efficiently which has high robustness in all kinds of complex scenes.
S1P-05
OPTICAL STUDY OF THE THERMAL LENSING ON ND:YAG CRYSTAL SLAB
Kosmas Gazeas1,2, Georgios Tzeremes2, Errico Armadillo2
1Department of Physics, Section of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, University of Athens, Greece
2European Space Agency, ESTEC, Mechatronics and Optics Division, Keplerlaan 1, 2200AG, Noordwijk,
The Netherlands
In this paper we report the results of the thermo-optical tests, performed under the study of the thermal lensing effects, which occur along the laser-diode-pumped Nd:YAG crystal slab. This research is motivated by the current ESA spaceborne lidar programs (ADM-Aeolus, EarthCARE-Atlid) as a mean to provide better understanding of the laser beam pointing stability for lidar applications, as a result of thermal and mechanical stresses. A simulation tool has been developed in parallel compares the predicted results with the laboratory measurements, being able to reproduce the observed optical effects and establishing a dynamical tool for estimation of the laser beam optical behavior while passing through the crystal slab. This model was developed using the Finite Element Model (FEM) methodology and simulates the optical characteristics of a laser beam, as it propagates through the Nd:YAG crystal slab in a zig-zag configuration, under certain, accurately controlled and dynamically variable boundary conditions.
S1P-06
FREQUENCY CHARACTERIZATION METHOD OF A BETA MODEL PULSED LASER TO BE USED AS SEEDER IN A HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR
Ioannis Manthos, Emmanouel Fokitis, Stavros Maltezos, Nikos Maragos, Prodromos Fetfatzis, Agelika Georgakopoulou, Violeta Gika
Physics Department, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, 15780 Zografou, Athens, Greece
In this paper we will present the progress made in the development of a sub-system related to a High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) which is being investigated for application in experiments of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray Observatories mainly due to the smaller error in the backscatter coefficient, due to higher signal compared with to the Raman lidar and the directness of the measurement of both the molecular and the aerosol signal in a model independent way. Requirement for the successful operation of the HSRL is Single Longitudinal Mode (SLM) function and stability of the frequency for the laser used. For this purpose we will characterize a commercial laser, candidate as laser seeder in HSRL, by Fabry-Perot interferometers. The details of the method and experimental results are presented.

S1P-07
INTERFEROMETER CAVITY LENGTH CONTROLLER FOR SEEDED Q-SWITCHED LASER
Martin E. Lawson, Edwin W. Eloranta
SSEC Lidar Group, 1225 Dayton Street Madison WI 53711, USA
A cavity length controller is constructed for a seeded Q-switched intra-cavity doubled Nd:YAG laser using an interferometer to detect frequency differences between the seed and slave cavity light.  An inexpensive controller was then constructed to minimize the detected frequency differences.  Observed performance is vastly superior to the original cavity controller which optimizes slave cavity pulse buildup time using end mirror position jitter.  Output spectum stays within 130 MHz of the seed laser 95% of the time with the new control vs 200 MHz with the original controller.  The new controller is also far more robust, and typically recovers from overload disturbances in less than 200 ms.
S1P-08
A NOVEL LOWER ATMOSPHERE RECEIVER SYSTEM (LARS) FOR RESONANCE-FLUORESCENCE LIDARS
John Anthony Smith and Xinzhao Chu
Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences & Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA
A new lower atmosphere receiver concept for a Fe-Doppler resonance fluorescence lidar is investigated. Borrowing from high spectral resolution lidars, the system uses both the reflection and transmission of a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) to provide spectral discrimination of lidar returns for deriving wind using the edge technique. By adding the FPI’s reflected and transmitted channels together, the effect of the FPI can be negated so that the resonance-fluorescence 3-frequency technique can simultaneously be used to derive wind and temperature in the MLT using the same receiver. Wind accuracy of approximately 1 m/s with 5 minute integration and 1 km resolution is predicted for altitudes around 43 km. This receiver is intended to be a step towards realizing the goal of a “whole atmosphere lidar” which would be capable of extending the wind and temperature measurement range of resonance fluorescence lidars from the lower thermosphere all the way to the surface, making these lidars more pertinent to the study of gravity wave propagation and breaking.
S1P-09
RESEARCH ON KEY TECHNOLOGIES OF MEMS SCANNING LARGE APERTURE FIBER-COUPLED INFRARED LASER HETERODYNE INTERFEROMETER SYSTEM
Gao Long, Zheng Yongchao, Tao Yuliang, Wang Aoyou
Beijing Institute of Space Electrical & Mechanical, Beijing, 100098, China
Laser heterodyne interferometry has been widely used in measurement of film thickness, tiny vibration and optical instrument quality control. In this paper, the 1.5 ¼m fiber-coupled large aperture and micro-electronical-mechanical system (MEMS) optical scanning laser heterodyne interferometer is proposed. This heterodyne interferometer system has the advantages of fast optical scanning process, high measurement resolution, eye-safety wavelength and compact size. The phase nonlinearity effect and dual-balanced heterodyne detection technique of this laser heterodyne interferometry are analyzed respectively. The design process and implementation of large aperture combined optical scanning system with MEMS and F-Theta lens with diameter of 300 mm, high-speed signal sampling and process, high-precision phase difference demodulation are solved technically. Finally, the experiment results show that the lateral resolution and vertical resolution are 3 mm and 1.6 nm which are limited by the diameter of beam spot incident on the sample surface and the frequency of probe signal and sample signal, respectively. The infrared material with the maximum peak thickness value of »/100 is obtained by this heterodyne interferometer system. It costs approximately 5 minutes to measure the whole infrared optical glass with the diameter of 300 mm.
S1P-10
FAST AND STABLE ONLINE-OFFLINE SWITCH OF THE UHOH WATER VAPOR DIAL
Florian Späth, Simon Metzendorf, Andreas Behrendt, Volker Wulfmeyer
University of Hohenheim, Institute of Physics and Meteorology, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
For the injection seeder system of the water-vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system of the University of Hohenheim a fast and stable optical switch has been developed. The laser pulses are generated with a Ti:Sapphire laser at 820 nm with a repetition rate of 250 Hz. To stabilize the wavelengths, the injection seeding technique is employed using two DFB lasers with a linewidth of (4.57±0.03) MHz and a frequency stability of 6.3 MHz. These values are about one order of magnitude better than the requirements. Our new online/offline frequency switch uses an electro-optical deflector (EOD) and achieves shot-to-shot switching with 125 Hz with a short response time of less than 8 ¼s and low crosstalk between the channels of 33.0 dB. The EOD switch replaces a former-used fiber switch with insufficient response time and higher crosstalk.
S1P-11
HIGH-POWER LASER TRANSMITTER OF THE UHOH WATER VAPOR DIAL
Simon Metzendorf, Andreas Behrendt, Florian Späth, Volker Wulfmeyer
University of Hohenheim, Institute of Physics and Meteorology, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
The transmitter of the water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) is a pulsed Ti:Sapphire laser system operating near 820 nm. A Nd:YAG master oscillator power amplifier serves as pump laser and two distributed feedback laser diodes as injection-seeders. The DIAL is arranged entirely in a mobile trailer with the capability to perform 3-dimensional scanning measurements. In this contribution, the new setup of the transmitter is introduced.
S1P-12
TRANSMITTER-RECEIVER UNIT OF THE UHOH WATER VAPOR DIAL WITH A SCANNING 800-mm TELESCOPE MIRROR
Andrea Riede1, Andreas Behrendt1, Volker Wulfmeyer1, Dietrich Althausen2, Ulla Wandinger2, Volker Klein3, Alexander Meister3, Max Schiller4
1University of Hohenheim, Institute of Physics and Meteorology, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
2 Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
3 Kayser-Threde GmbH, 81379 Munich, Germany
4Fraunhofer Institute of Optronics, 76275 Ettlingen, Germany
The water-vapor differential absorption lidar system of University of Hohenheim (UHOH DIAL) is a scanning lidar system capable of performing full hemispherical scans based on the Coudé-concept. The 800-mm receiving telescope and a transmitter telescope are mounted on the scanning unit together with a safety radar. The transmitted laser beam is guided with an optical fiber to the transmitter telescope. The whole system is housed by a mobile platform in order to perform measurements at different field sites. The platform was specifically designed to fulfill the requirements of the sensitive optical and electronic parts of the DIAL equipment.




S1P-13
HIGH ENERGY MOPA AT 1.55 µM REGION FOR LIDAR APPLICATIONS WITH A DOUBLE-PASS-ASSISTED Q-SWITCHED FIBER LASER AND A SINGLE-STAGE PM EDFA
Giorgos Avdikos1, Paraskevas Bakopoulos2, Hercules Avramopoulos2
1School of Applied Mathematical and Physical Sciences, National Technical University of Athens,
Heroon Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou, Greece
2School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens,
Heroon Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou, Greece
We demonstrate an all-fiber, single-polarization Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) system suitable for lidar applications. The system consists of an all-fiber double-pass-assisted Q-switched laser and a single-stage polarization-maintaining (PM) Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA). We show how the multipeak (MMP) pulse structure (MMP phenomenon) is formulated within this actively-switched fiber laser and changes the single pulse shape. The development of pulse substructure is solely due to gain dynamic effects and the characteristics of the active Q-switching element (acousto-optic modulator in our case) play the most important role in the process. The generation of the Q-switched pulses is in accordance with theoretical expectations. Introduction of a double-pass configuration in the laser cavity allows single-polarization operation without the use of expensive PM components to provide the gain and gating functionalities in the Q-switched laser. A single-stage high-power amplifier at the output of the ring laser boosts the output power to 0.4 W, achieving high Optical Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (OSNR) levels up to 42 dB (0.01 nm resolution). The obtained optical spectra (before and after EDFA amplification) show operation in the 1.55 µm region. Application of filters with different cut-off regions can alter the central peak from within the gain bandwidth of Erbium-doped fibers.
S1P-14
UTILIZATION OF A FIELD LENS TO IMPROVE THE OVERLAP FUNCTION
IN LIDAR SYSTEMS USING OPTICAL FIBERS
Adolfo Comerón1, Michaël Sicard1,2, Dhiraj Kumar1,2, Francesc Rocadenbosch1,2, Diego Lange1,2
1Dept. of Signal Theory and Communication, Remote Sensing Lab., Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, c. Jordi, Girona 1-3. 08034 Barcelona, Spain
2Institut d’Estudis Espacials de Catalunya, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, c. Jordi Girona 29. 08034, Barcelona, Spain
Theoretical calculations and experimental verification are presented on the improvement of the overlap function that the use of a field lens produces in a lidar system using a bundle of optical fibers to bring the light collected by the telescope to the photodetector assembly.
S1P-15
A PROPOSAL OF SIMPLE RESONANCE SCATTERING LIDAR USING AN ALKALI METAL VAPOR LASER
Makoto Abo, Chikao Nagasawa, Yasukuni Shibata
Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino, Tokyo 191-0065, Japan
Many observations of metal atomic layers such as Na, Fe, K, Li and Ca in the mesopause region have been conducted in many parts of the world. We have observed several mesospheric metallic layers at Tokyo and Indonesia using resonance scattering lidars. Instead of resonance scattering lidars consisting of a dye laser and a Ti:Sapphire laser for observations of metal atomic layers such as Na and K in the mesopause region, we propose the resonance scattering lidar system consisting of the alkali vapor laser. Optically pumped alkali vapor lasers have attracted increasing attention because of their potential of achieving high power in a high quality beam. The alkali vapor laser can easily realize narrow line width and precise tuning. We propose that the alkali vapor laser can be used for resonance scattering lidar.

S1P-16
ADVANCES OF THE MULTIANGLE LIDAR FOR CTA OBSERVATORY AT CEILAP
Juan Vicente Pallotta1, Pablo Ristori1, Lidia Otero1, Francisco Gonzalez1, Juan Carlos Dworniczak1, Raul D'Elia2, Ezequiel Pawelko1, Fernando Chouza3, Alberto Etchegoyen4, Eduardo Quel1
1CEILAP, UNIDEF (MINDEF-CONICET). UMI-IFAECI-CNRS 3351, San Juan Bautista de la Salle 4397, Buenos Aires, Argentina
2CONICET. Rivadavia 1917 - 1033 Buenos Aires, Argentina
3CEILAP, UNIDEF (MINDEF-CONICET). UMI-IFAECI-CNRS 3351, MINDEF fellow, San Juan Bautista de la Salle 4397, Buenos Aires, Argentina
4ITeDA (CNEA – CONICET – UNSAM). Av. Gral. Paz 1499-1650, San Martín, Argentina
At CEILAP CITEDEF-CONICET, a multiangle lidar is under development to measure the aerosol extinction coefficient in the frame of the CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array) Project, actually in the preparatory phase. CTA is an initiative to build the next generation of ground-based instruments to collect very high energy gamma-ray radiation (> 10 GeV). The atmospheric conditions are of major interest to CTA, and lidars are requested to acquire atmospheric profiles fast, accurately and in the line of sight of the event. These systems play a major role measuring the atmospheric optical depth in any direction, by both detecting the overall cloud coverage and measuring the atmospheric opacity due to aerosol and clouds over the Observatory. The location of this astronomical facility will be selected after a careful study of the candidate sites, regarding the latitude, altitude, the atmospheric conditions, and the available local infrastructure. At the Southern hemisphere, Argentina is one of the candidate countries for the installation of the CTA Observatory. The places proposed are “CASLEO”, located in San Juan state and “San Antonio de los Cobres”, in Salta. This work reviews the Observatory requirements and advances for the lidar system and the data acquisition software.
S1P-17
LED MINI-LIDAR
Tatsuo Shiina
Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi,
263-8522, Japan
Lidar technology has improved for 50 years after the innovation of the laser. Its applications widely spread in weather, environmental science, atmospheric science, security, and military fields. Its techniques are mutual. The current task is usefulness in various fields as an essential monitoring device. To install the lidar system in a certain field, the frequent problems are on the laser system. Because of unstable operation of the power supply, static electricity, and the limited lifetime of the pumping equipments such as flash lamp and laser diode, the laser system often stops to fire accidentally. The alignment or the replacement of the pumping equipment needs careful knowledge and it is hard for laymen. In this study, a LED device is tried to be used as the lidar light source in place of a traditional laser device. The LED mini-lidar was developed for feasibility study. A LED device is tough against static electricity and can be easily operated. The selection of the wavelength is wider than for LED. Although the LED collimation is worse than the LED collimation, it is acceptable by expanding the diameter of the transmitting beam. Especially, atmospheric/gas monitoring in near range is applicable with weak transmitting power. Its application is monitoring of indoor air/gas conditions and traffic conditions on highways and crossings. In this report, the structure of the LED mini-lidar is introduced with some observation data. The applications of the LED mini-lidar are considered, too.




S1P-18
SIMULATION STUDIES OF THE BACKSCATTERING SIGNAL IN HSRL TECHNIQUE
Angelika Georgakopoulou
National Technical University of Athens, Physics Department, Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens, Greece
The technique of the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) for atmospheric monitoring allows the determination of the aerosol to molecular ratio and can be used in Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) Observatories using air fluorescence telescopes. By this technique a more accurate estimate of the Cherenkov radiation superimposed to the fluorescence signal can be achieved. A laboratory setup was developed to determine the backscattering coefficients using micro-particles diluted in water and diffusion interfaces. In this setup we used a CW SLM laser at 532 nm and a 250 mm Newtonian telescope. Simulations of the above experimental configuration have been made using Scatlab©, FINESSE© 0.99.8 and MATLAB© and are presented in this work. We compare the simulated 2-dimensional Fabry-Perot fringe images of the backscattering signal recorded in the CCD sensor with that of experimental ones. Additionally, we simulated the backscattering of the laser beam by the atmosphere at a height of 2000 m and we have studied the influence of the beam and its diameter on the fringe image.
S1P-19
DEVELOPMENT OF TWO-WAVELENGTH HIGH-SPECTRAL¬RESOLUTION LIDAR AND APPLICATION TO SHIPBORNE MEASUREMENTS
Tomoaki Nishizawa1, Nobuo Sugimoto1, Ichiro Matsui1, Toshiaki Takano2
1National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, 305-0052, Japan
2Chiba University, Inage, Chiba, 263-8522, Japan
A two-wavelength High-Spectral-Resolution Lidar (HSRL) system for the next-generation lidar networkwas developed. This lidar system provides 2±+3²+2´ data: extinction coefficients (±) at 355 and 532 nm, backscatter coefficients (²) at 355, 532, and 1064 nm, and depolarization ratios (´) at 532 and 1064 nm. This system combines use of the previously developed HSRL techniques with an iodine absorption filter for 532 nm and a Fabry-Perot etalon for 355 nm. We developed a system to tune the laser wavelengthto an iodine absorption line and tune the etalon wavelengthto the fixed laser wavelength in this lidar system to realize continuous measurements day andnight. We further constructed a 532 nm HSRL systembased on the two-wavelength HSRL system and conducted shipborne HSRL measurements over Indianocean in 2011. This lidar system provides ± at 532 nm, ² at 532 and 1064 nm, and ´ at 532 nm as well as water vapor content using Raman lidar techniques (1±+2²+1´+H2O data). The temporal and verticalvariation of aerosols and clouds could be determined.The derived particle optical properties were generallyconsistent with previous studies, indicating that thedeveloped lidar systems worked well, though themultiple scattering effects should be considered in thedata analysis in the future.
S1P-20
VERY HIGH-RESOLUTION NA DOPPLER LIDAR AT BOULDER, COLORADO
John Anthony Smith, Weichun Fong, Brendan Roberts, Wentao Huang, Xinzhao Chu
Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences & Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA
We present a Na wind and temperature lidar developed by graduate students at the University of Colorado: the “Student Training and Atmospheric Research” (STAR) lidar. Although employing a classical dye-laser-based transmitter, the performance far exceeds that of existing Na lidars with similar power-aperture products, yielding high-resolution temperature and wind measurements in the mesopause region–a result of innovative approaches to high optical efficiency in the lidar receiver and detection systems, particularly ray tracing of the receiver chain. Observations in summer 2011 are shown to demonstrate the first high-resolution measurements by the STAR lidar at Boulder (40.13°N, 105.24°W), Colorado. We also demonstrate a precise technique for characterizing PMT non-linearity and pulse pileup effects using equipment familiar in resonance-fluorescence lidars. The approaches presented here are applicable to general resonance fluorescence lidars, enabling performance gains sufficient to enable new science studies such as high-frequency wave dynamics and flux estimation.
S1P-21
CIAO: THE CNR-IMAA ADVANCED OBSERVATORY FOR ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH
Gelsomina Pappalardo, Aldo Amodeo, Ioannis Binietoglou, Antonella Boselli, Giuseppe D’Amico, Aldo Giunta, Fabio Madonna, Lucia Mona, Nikolaos Papagiannopoulos, Marco Rosoldi
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche – Istituto di Metodologie per l’Analisi Ambientale, CNR-IMAA, C. da S. Loja, Tito Scalo, 85050 Potenza, Italy
Long-term observations of aerosol and clouds are of crucial importance to understand the weather climate system. At the Istituto di Metodologie per l’Analisi Ambientale of the Italian National Research Council (CNR-IMAA) an advanced atmospheric observatory, named CIAO, is operative. CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory) main scientific objective is the long term measurement for the climatology of aerosol and cloud properties. Its equipment addresses the state-of-the-art for the ground-based remote sensing of aerosol, water vapour and clouds including active and passive sensors, like lidars, ceilometers, radiometers, and a radar. This paper describes the CIAO infrastructure, its scientific activities as well as the observation strategy. The observation strategy is mainly organized in order to provide quality assured measurements for satellite validation and model evaluation and to fully exploit the synergy and integration of the active and passive sensors for the improvement of atmospheric profiling. Data quality is ensured both by the application of protocols and dedicated quality assurance programs mainly related to the projects and networks in which the infrastructure is involved. The paper also introduces examples of observations performed at CIAO and of the synergies and integration algorithms (using Raman lidar and microwave profiler data) developed and implemented at the observatory for the optimization and improvement of water vapour profiling. CIAO database represents an optimal basis to study the synergy between different sensors and to investigate aerosol-clouds interactions, and can give a significant contribution to the validation programs of the incoming new generation satellite missions.
S1P-22
MOBILE HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR
Ilya Razenkov, Edwin W. Eloranta, Martin Lawson, Joseph P. Garcia
University of Wisconsin, 1225 W. Dayton St., Madison, WI, 53706, USA
The new University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar (BAGO-HSRL) was developed as both a stationary instrument and for use in a mobile trailer equipped with the University of Wisconsin Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and other meteorological instruments (AERIBAGO project). The new HSRL has a concept similar to previously built lidars, operating through a single telescope to transmit and receive light. This reduces the energy density in the transmitted beam to eye-safe levels and improves mechanical stability allowing it to operate with a small field-of-view. These lidars are designed to continuously operate in remote areas requiring low maintenance. The new instrument has an elevation angle scanning capability and can alternate the polarization of transmitted light pulses which allows the detection of oriented ice crystals.






S1P-23
THE CLOUD, AEROSOL BACKSCATTER AND POLARIZATION LIDAR AT SUMMIT, GREENLAND
Ryan Reynolds Neely III1, Matthew Hayman2, Jeffrey P. Thayer3, R. Michael Hardesty4, Michael O’Neill5, Robert Stillwell6, Catherine Alvarez7
1NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CIRES, and the University of Colorado,
Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Boulder, Colorado, 80309, USA
2National Center for Atmospheric Research, Earth Observing Lab, Boulder, Colorado, 80307, USA
3University of Colorado, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, Boulder, Colorado, 80309, USA
4NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Boulder, CO 80305, USA
5CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, 80309, USA
6University of Colorado, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, Boulder, Colorado, 80309, USA
7NOAA/ESRL Global Monitoring Division, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, 80309, USA
Precise measurements of cloud properties over Greenland are necessary to document the full range of cloud conditions and characteristics throughout the Arctic. The Cloud, Aerosol Polarization and Backscatter Lidar (CAPABL) has been developed to address this need by measuring depolarization, particle orientation and backscatter of clouds and aerosols in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. CAPABL uses recent developments in optical methods to detect particle orientation by quantifying the diattenuation of the returned signal. The lidar is located at Summit, Greenland (72.60 N, 38.50 W; 3200 m.a.s.l.) as part of the Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric State, and Precipitation at Summit project and NOAA's Global Monitoring Division's stratospheric lidar network. Here the instrument is described with particular emphasis placed upon the implementation of the new polarization methods developed as part of this instrument. Initial results of the lidar are also shown to demonstrate the ability of the lidar to observe cloud properties.
S1P-24
TWO YEARS OPERATION OF MULTIWAVELENGTH AEROSOL LIDAR IN TURKEY
Kerim Ragym Allahverdiev1,2, M. F. Huseyinoglu1, Z. Yu. Salaeva1, A. Secgin1, I. Veselovskii3, M. Korenskii3, N. Volkov3 
1 TÜBITAK, Marmara Research Center, Materials Institute, P.K. 21, 41470 Gebze / Kocaeli, Turkey
2 Azerbaijan National Academy of Aviation, Bina 25th km, Baku 1045, Azerbaijan
3Physics Instrumentation Center of General Physics Institute, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow Region, 142190, Russia
The multiwavelength Mie-Raman lidars become the recognized tools for study of atmospheric aerosols. In the middle of 2009 such a lidar named MRC K09 has been built in the Turkish Scientific and Technological Research Council (TÜBITAK), Marmara Research Center (MRC), Materials Institute (MI) in a frame of joint cooperation between the TÜBITAK and the Physics Instrumentation Center (PIC) of General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences. By such a lidar, it is possible to quantify three aerosol backscattering and two extinction coefficients (3²+2±) and from these data, the particle parameters such as concentration, radius and complex refractive index can be retrieved. In this paper, the results of lidar measurements during 2009-2011 together with retrieval of the particle microphysical parameters are presented.
S1P-25
RECENT UPGRADES OF THE MULTIWAVELENGTH POLARIZATION RAMAN LIDAR POLLYXT
Ronny Engelmann1, Dietrich Althausen1, Birgit Heese1, Holger Baars1, Mika Komppula2
1Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (IfT), Leipzig, Germany
2Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Kuopio, Finland
The scientiûc aerosol-and cloud-research community demands for autonomous and quality-assured lidar measurements of aerosol proûles. We present recent modiûcations of our portable 3+2+1 Raman aerosol lidar PollyXT which where made in order to fulûll these criteria. Following EARLINET guidelines we modiûed the optical setup in order to improve the near-range signals dramatically by imaging the main-mirror onto the PMTs. Also we added a ±45° calibration possibility for the depolarization measurements. Since water vapor is an important parameter for aerosol research, too, we also added a water-vapor channel at 407 nm.
S1P-26
MONITORING WAKE VORTICES WITH A SCANNING DOPPLER LIDAR
Sophie Loaëc1, Ludovic Thobois1, Jean Pierre Cariou1, Agnès Dolfi-Bouteyre2, Didier Goular2
1LEOSPHERE, 76 Rue Monceau, 75008 Paris, France
2ONERA, DOTA/SLS, Palaiseau, France
Measuring and foreseeing wind conditions near airports are crucial issues for air traffic safety. Since aircraft manoeuvrability is the worst during takeoff and landing phases, strong air movements near airports such as wake vortices can have dramatic consequences on aircrafts. Wake vortices are created by all the aircrafts. Size and intensity of wake vortices are directly linked to the flight speed and also by plane characteristics, such as weight and wingspan. Even if strong efforts have been done to study and model wake vortices, on-site measurements remain the best way to detect them as they depend a lot on meteorological conditions near airports especially wind and turbulence. Coherent laser radars or lidars can be very useful devices for measuring wake vortices on airports. A WINDCUBE 200S developed by LEOSPHERE has been deployed at Charles De Gaulle airport near Paris in the framework of the European project SESAR and the subpackage 12.2.2 dedicated to wake vortices detection in cooperation with THALES AIR SYSTEMS. With specific swept scenarios, the WINDCUBE 200S has been able to detect the wake vortices of heavy, medium and small aircrafts during takeoff and landing. Wake vortices have been monitored for a significant period. A dedicated post-treatment has been developed by the French Aerospace Lab. ONERA for computing the cores position of wake vortices and for calculating theirs circulations. Thanks to that post-treatment the evolution of wake vortices trajectories and circulations can be determined. Several analyses have been achieved in order to determine the influence of the wind conditions on the trajectories of wake vortices. A variety of trajectories have been put in front.
S1P-27
DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF AN OPTICAL FIBER-BASED LASER REMOTE SENSOR FOR AIRBORNE MEASUREMENT OF WIND VELOCITY
Scott M. Spuler1, Mike Spowart1, Dirk Richter1,2
1National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3450 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO, USA
2Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA
Accurate measurement of wind speed and direction from an in-ûight aircraft is essential for many areas of experimental atmospheric research. The only feasible way of calibrating air velocity sensors on aircraft (e.g., surface mounted pressure-based systems) require ûight maneuvers which limit achievable accuracy. This is especially problematic when attempting to measure small magnitude vertical wind speeds which are important for eddy ûux estimates. Laser remote sensing can provide an absolute measurement independent of ûight maneuvers and atmospheric conditions. The opportunity to make wind measurements remotely using laser technology offers signiûcant improvements in accuracy and response time that will beneût many areas of research. The advent of ûber-based components has made it practical to implement a laser air motion sensor, LAMS, on an aircraft platform. An all optical ûber-based LAMS is under development at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). A single-beam prototype was successfully demonstrated in 2010 and has the potential to provide a much-needed and long-desired air velocity measurement that will provide valuable information about air motion in the vicinity of the aircraft. This paper describes the instrument development that extends the prototype design – enabling three-dimensional wind measurement. Recent developments are discussed including an overview of a new wing-pod and laser system and results from a 2011 test ûight campaign.
S1P-28
ESTIMATION OF WIND TURBINE WAKE CHARACTERISTICS
FROM DOPPLER LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Yelena Pichugina1,2, R. M. Banta2, W. A. Brewer2, J. K. Lundquist3,4, R. M. Hardesty2, R. J. Alvarez2, M. L. Aitken3, S. P. Sandberg2, A. M. Weickmann1.2, N. D. Kelley4 and J. D. Mirocha5
1Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), Boulder, CO, U.S.A
2 Earth System Research Laboratories (ESRL), NOAA, Boulder, CO, U.S.A
3University of Colorado (CU), Boulder, CO, U.S.A
4National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO, U.S.A
5Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA, U.S.A
Velocity deficits and enhanced turbulence generated by turbine blade rotation are the two major wake effects that could extend to distances of several rotor diameters behind a wind turbine. Accounting for wakes is an important issue in the optimization of sitting turbines in a wind farm and improving design of wind turbines. We used NOAA’s High-Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) to obtain simultaneous measurements of vertical and horizontal wind flow features, both upwind and downwind of a research wind turbine, during the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS) at the NREL National Wind Technology Center in the spring of 2011. The ability of HRDL to sweep the atmosphere along constant azimuth and elevation angles was used to develop a scanning strategy to provide a variety of high resolution boundary layer (BL) information. Velocity deficit, wake downwind extent, and wake meandering were measured under different wind speed and BL stability conditions. Results obtained from both vertical-slice scans, performed along the lidar-turbine centerline, and conical sector scans, performed in the narrow sector around wind turbine at four levels, showed averaged velocity deficits of 6-8 m s-1 extending up to 1015 rotor diameters downstream of the turbine.
S1P-29
COST-EFFECTIVE LIDAR TECHNOLOGY FOR WIND-ENERGY
Samu Tapani Järvinen1, Juha Toivonen1, Juho Kerttula2, Valery Filippov2, Oleg Okhotnikov2, Samuli Laukkanen3 and Hannu Valo3
1Optics laboratory, Tampere University of Technology (TUT), Tampere, Finland
2Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland
3Vaisala Oyj, Vantaa, Finland
Remote sensing of the wind in the vicinity of wind turbines and farms can be used for turbine controlling. Instant adaptation to changes in the wind leads to the higher and steadier output power and diminished stress of the turbines. Remote sensing technology can also be used in the site assessment measurements of new turbines.Wind-LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) resolves the wind-originated Doppler shift in the backscattered laser light from aerosols and air molecules. Commercial lidars are already available with measurement ranges up to several kilometers. However, the measurement range of only 300 m is sufficient for the needs of wind turbines, which is possible to accomplish without high-priced equipment. Thus, this work is focused on developing a cost-effective wind-LIDAR technology for lower tropospheric measurements. In this work, a fiber-optic heterodyne LIDAR device was constructed and its initial tests were performed in laboratory conditions. It operates at a 1.5 ¼m wavelength region and most of the components are inexpensive and widely available telecommunication fiber components. A custom fiber amplifier was designed and built to avoid stimulated Brillouin scattering. With two short-fiber amplification stages, it provides over 30 dB amplification, while maintaining the narrow line width of the seed laser.
S1P-30
DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF DOPPLER LIDAR FOR ATMOSPHERIC WIND OBSERVATIONS
Karnam Raghunath, Achuthan Jayaraman
National Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Gadnki-517 112, India
An incoherent Dopper lidar has been developed to measure lower atmospheric winds. The lidar installed at Gadanki (13.6ºN, 79.2ºE), India is first of its kind developed in India. It operates on Edge technique using stabilised laser and Servo stabilised Fabry-Pérot Interferometer (FPI) as main components. The FPI is optimised for molecular returns and the wind measurements were carried out where the aerosol loading is minimal. This optical fiber coupled lidar system operates in Doppler Beam Swinging mode to determine the Zonal and Meridional winds from radial velocities. Intercomparison of the lidar winds was performed with GPS Sonde balloons and collocated VHF Radar on a few days. Results have shown good Correlation Coefficients. These results are expected to give more insight to our main objective of obtaining stratospheric winds in stratosphere.
S1P-31
MIDDLE-ATMOSPHERE WIND DETECTION USING A MOBILE DOPPLER RAYLEIGH LIDAR BASED ON TRIPLE-CHANNEL FABRY-PEROT INTERFEROMETER
Haiyun Xia, Dongsong Sun, XianKang Dou, Zhifeng Xue, Yan Han, Dongdong Hu
School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai rd. Hefei, Anhui, 230026, China
A mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar based on double-edge technique is developed for wind measurement from the upper troposphere to the stratosphere in the University of Science and Technology of China. The measurement results show good agreement in the comparison experiment between the lidar and the rawinsonde. Continuous wind detection is carried out, demonstrating the stability and robustness of the lidar. Stratospheric quasi-zero wind layer is observed with an evident direction change from west to east throughout September, 2011 in Urumqi, China.
S1P-32
DEVELOPMENT OF ALL-FIBER COHERENT DOPPLER LIDAR TO MEASURE ATMOSPHERE WIND SPEED
Jiqiao Liu, Xiaolei Zhu, Xiaopeng Zhu, Weifeng Diao, Yuan Liu, De Cang Bi, Weibiao Chen
Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Key Laboratory of All Solid-state Laser and Applied Techniques, No. 390 Qinghe Rd., Jiading District, Shanghai, China
An all-fiber pulsed coherent Doppler lidar (CDL) prototype system is developed to measure atmosphere wind speed. The system configuration is introduced and some key components re presented. The pulse energy of the system is about 50 ¼J with pulse width of 500 ns. And the diameter of the telescope is 50 mm. Several experiments are carried out to validate the performance of the system. The stand deviation of intermediate frequency of this CDL system is 0.033 MHz. With 3000 pulses accumulation, the horizontal maximum measurement range for wind speed is about 2.6km in clear day, and the vertical range is about 1.3 km. Maximum vertical measurement range of 1.9 km is obtained with 18000 pulses accumulated.
S1P-33
AN ABSOLUTE FREQUENCY STABILIZATION SYSTEM DESIGN FOR USTC SODIUM TEMPERATURE/WIND LIDAR
Fang Xin, Li Tao, Liu Wei, Gu Shengyang
CAS key laboratory for Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, University
of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China.
We recently developed a narrowband high-spectralresolution sodium lidar at the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei, China (31.50 N, 1170 E).This system could measure temperature and wind profiles in the mesopause region (80-105 km). The absolute laser frequency shift of 1 MHz will lead to the 0.1 K error in temperature measurement and 0.6 m/s error in wind measurement. To improve the accuracy of temperature and wind measurement, we built an absolute frequency stabilization system, which locks the laser frequency to sodium Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy D2a peak line by combining the ‘side of fringe’ technique and phase locking technique. The frequency fluctuation of the locked laser is within ± 2 MHz.
S1P-34
REFURBISHMENT AND UPGRADE OF FE BOLTZMANN/RAYLEIGH TEMPERATURE LIDAR AT BOULDER FOR A MCMURDO LIDAR CAMPAIGN IN ANTARCTICA
Zhangjun Wang1,2, Xinzhao Chu1, Wentao Huang1, Weichun Fong1, John Anthony Smith1, Brendan Roberts1
1University of Colorado at Boulder, 216 UCB, CIRES, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA
2Institute of Oceanographic Instrumentation, Shandong Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, Shandong, 266001, China
For a lidar campaign at McMurdo, Antarctica (77.8°S, 166.7°E) to make year-round measurements of atmospheric temperature, composition, and dynamics with full-diurnal coverage, an alexandrite-laser-based Fe Boltzmann and Rayleigh temperature lidar was upgraded to enhance its specifications via incorporating new technologies. Detailed performance analysis and temperature calibration of the lidar were made at Boulder, Colorado. In this paper we describe the upgrade of the lidar system and present the results of full diurnal measurements made from the Table Mountain Lidar Observatory in Boulder (40°N, 105°W).
S1P-35
ANALYSIS FOR THE MEASUREMENT CAPABILITY OF ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE USING THE MOBILE DOPPLER LIDAR
Yubao Chen1,2,3, Yuchun Gao1, Zhaoai Yan4, Zhe Li,1 Bingyi Liu5, Huang Li1
1Meteorological Observation Centre, China Meteorological Administration, China
2 Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, China
3State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, China
4 National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
5Ocean University of China, China
The first mobile Doppler lidar in China, which is supported by China Meteorological Administration (CMA), and developed through collaborations between the Ocean University of China and the 14th research institute of the CETC, is high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL). It employs iodine filter as frequency discriminator to lock the frequency of the emitting laser at the center of the iodine absorption line 1109 bottom. As the backscattering signal of the aerosol can be absorbed by the iodine filter, the remaining signal is the Rayleigh backscattering, and the temperature profile can be retrieved from the signal intensity of the Rayleigh backscattering. Compared with temperature profile detected by the radiosounding system, the systematic difference below 10.5 kilometers is less than 1 K and the standard deviation is less than 2 K.
S1P-36
DEEP UV RAMAN-LIDAR GAS ANALYZER FOR ENVIRONMENT MONITORING
Sergey Mikhailovich Bobrovnikov1,2, Evgeny Vladimirovich Gorlov1,2, Viktor Ivanovich Zharkov1
1V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, Russia
2Tomsk State University, Russia
Capabilities of a Raman lidar system based on the narrow line (5 pm) excimer KrF laser used for excitation of the Raman spectra are considered.The lidar returns of the oxygen and nitrogen Raman spectral bands and their overtones in a pure atmosphere are demonstrated. A possibility of increasing the Raman lidar sensitivity by additional suppression of the nitrogen and oxygen vibrational-rotational bands is discussed. The results of remote detection of vapors of several chemical compoundsare presented. It is shown that the concentration detection limit of about 1 ppm can be achieved.
S1P-37
A 2-MICRON PULSED INTEGRATED PATH DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION LIDAR DEVELOPMENT FOR ATMOSPHERIC CO2 CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS
Jirong Yu1, Mulugeta Petros1, Karl Reithmaier2, Yingxin Bai2, Bo Trieu1, Tamer F. Refaat3, Michael J. Kavaya1, Upendra N Singh1, Syed Ismail1
1NASA Langley Research Center, MS 468, Hampton, VA 23681, USA
2Science System &Applications, Inc, One Enterprise Parkway, Hampton, Virginia 23666, USA
3Old Dominion University, Applied Research Center, Newport News, VA 23606, USA
A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capbility by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the CW IPDA measurement.
S1P-38
DIGITAL LOCK-IN DETECTION FOR MULTIPLE-FREQUENCY INTENSITY MODULATED CONTINUOUS WAVE CO2 LASER LIDAR
Songsheng Chen1, Yingxin Bai2, Larry B. Petway1, Byron L. Meadows1, Joel F, Campbell1, Fenton W. Harrison1, Edward V. Browell1
1NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681, USA
2SSAI, One Enterprise Parkway, Suite 200, Hampton, VA 23666, USA
A digital lock-in detection technique has been used in an airborne Intensity-Modulated (IM) Continuous Wave (CW) Multi Functional Laser Lidar (MFLL) for many years to achieve highly precise detection of CO2 in the atmosphere. To detect the multiple- frequency modulated signals effectively, the digital lock-in detection requires an appropriate low-pass digital averaging filter for the sampling frequency and all modulation frequencies. This article presents a numerical analysis of a simple averaging filter for the digital lock-in detection applied to the laser lidar system.
S1P-39
FREQUENCY CHIRPED INTENSITY MODULATED LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AT 1.57 MICRON WAVELENGTH FOR MEASUREMENT OF CO2 CONCENTRATION
Masaharu Imaki1, Shumpei Kameyama1, Yoshihito Hirano1, Shinichi Ueno1, Daisuke Sakaizawa2, Shuji Kawakami2, Masakatsu Nakajima2
1Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, 5-1-1 Ofuna, Kamakura, Kanagawa, 247-8501, Japan
2Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaragi, 305-8505, Japan
We have demonstrated the laser absorption spectrometer using frequency chirped intensity modulation at 1.57 ¼m wavelength for measurement of CO2 concentration. Using the frequency chirped modulation technique, received signals from difference ranges can be discriminated by frequencies in electrical signal domain. In this paper, we have reported the discrimination of two signals from the targets with different ranges. It is shown that stable CO2 concentration measurement corresponding to fluctuation of 4 ppm (rms) has been achieved in 32 s measurement intervals.
S1P-40
LIDAR DETECTION OF EXPLOSIVE PRECURSORS
Luca Fiorani1, Sergey Babichenko2, Jonathan Bennes3, Rodolfo Borelli1, Roberto Chirico1, Agnes Dolfi-Bouteyre4, Laurent Hespel5, Thierry Huet5, Valentin Mitev3, Antonio Palucci1, Marco Pistilli1, Adriana Puiu1, Ott Rebane2 
1UTAPRAD-DIM, ENEA, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Italy
2LDI, Valukoja 7, 11415 Tallinn, Estonia
3CSEM, Rue de l’Observatoire 58, CH-2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
4ONERA, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau, France
5ONERA, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse, France
The aim of the project BONAS (BOmb factory detection by Networks of Advanced Sensors) is to design, develop and test an innovative sensor wireless network, in order to increase citizen protection and homeland security from terrorist attacks, especially against the threat posed by improvised explosive devices, or IEDs. To achieve this objective, the work package 4 involves the realization of a remote sensor lidar/DIAL. Since this system is focused on the discovery of bomb factories by the detection of precursors, we focused on these latter, particularly on liquid precursors that could lead to the escape of vapors outside the building in which they are prepared. So, we considered a priority the characterization of acetone, hydrogen peroxide and nitromethane, in agreement with the current trends of terrorism. Finally, we chose a source that, at least in favorable cases, allows the detection of such components.
S1P-41
EXPERIMENTAL CO2 MEASUREMENT BY COHERENT 2 µM DIFFERENTIAL
ABSORPTION AND WIND LIDAR WITH ATMOSPHERIC AND HARD TARGET RETURNS
Shoken Ishii1, Mizuki Koyama2, Kohei Mizutani1, Philippe Baron1, Hironori Iwai1, Ryoko Oda1, Hirotake Fukuoka3, Takayoshi Ishikawa4, Toshikazu Itabe1, Atsushi Sato4, and Kazuhiro Asai5
1National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1 Nukuikitamachi Koganei-shi Tokyo 184-
8795, Japan
2 Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6 Asahigaoka Hino-sh, Tokyo Japan 191-0065, Japan
3Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuch Hamakita-ku Hamamatsu-shi Shizuoka 434-8601, Japan
4Nippon Aleph Co., 1-28-52 Komaoka Tsurumi-ku Yokohama-shi 230-0071, Japan
5Tohoku Institute of Technology, 35-1 kasumi-cho Yagiyama Taihaku-ku Sendai-shi Miyagi 982-8577, Japan
A coherent 2-¼m differential absorption and wind lidar (Co2DiaWiL) with a 2-¼m single-frequency Q-switched laser with laser frequency offset locking was used to examine the detection sensitivity of 2 ¼m integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. Experimental CO2 measurement was conducted using the Co2DiaWiL and atmospheric (aerosol) and hard target returns (surface) in the western part of Tokyo. The results obtained by the hard target returns were compared with those measured by the atmospheric returns and the in situ sensor. There were large differences in the CO2 concentration between the Co2DiaWiL and the in situ sensor. The results estimated using the hard target return agreed roughly with the results using the atmospheric return.  The preliminary CO2 measurements showed that the achieved precisions of CO2 measurement with the atmospheric and hard target returns were 1.0% and 0.8%.  The preliminary results indicated that the CO2 measurement with the hard target return has a potential to make CO2 measurement with a high accuracy.
S1P-42
CHARM-F – THE AIRBORNE CH4 AND CO2 IPDA LIDAR: STATUS AND OUTLOOK
Axel Amediek1, Christian Büdenbender1, Gerhard Ehret1, Andreas Fix1, Christoph Kiemle1, Mathieu Quatrevalet1, Martin Wirth1, Dieter Hoffmann2, Raphael Kasemann2, Jürgen Klein2, Jens Löhring2, Volker Klein3
1Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Institut für Physik der Atmosphäre, 82234 Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany
2Fraunhofer Institut für Lasertechnik (ILT), Steinbachstr. 15, 52074 Aachen, Germany
3Kayser-Threde GmbH, 81379 München, Germany
HARM-F (CO2 and CH4 Atmospheric Remote Monitoring - Flugzeug) is DLR’s new airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar for simultaneous measurements of the column- weighted average dry-air mixing ratios of atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane. It is designed to be flown on board DLR’s new High-Altitude, LOng-range research aircraft, HALO. Besides water vapor, CO2 and methane are the most important greenhouse gases of the Earth’s atmosphere. However, there is still a lack of knowledge on sources, sinks and the underlying processes of these major GHGs. One purpose of CHARM-F is to experimentally investigate the feasibility of the IPDA lidar technique to provide a precise method for remote sensing of these two atmospheric trace gases. Furthermore, the system can serve as an airborne demonstrator for future spaceborne applications of this technical approach. In this context, the generation of real-world data can support the development of retrieval algorithms considerably. Not least, operated on HALO it is a powerful tool to investigate scientific topics on CO2 and CH4. All precursor experiments and the design phase of the instrument are completed. At the moment the system is being set up. First tests are planned for fall 2012.
S1P-43
REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE
BY COMBINING LIDAR AND OPTICAL CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY
Benjamin Thomas1, Alain Miffre1, Grégory David1, Jean-Pierre Cariou2, Patrick Rairoux1
1Laboratoire de Spectrométrie Ionique et Moléculaire, CNRS, UMR 5579 Université Lyon 1, 10 rue Ada Byron,
69622 Villeurbanne, France
2Leosphere France, 14-16 rue Jean Rostand, 91400 Orsay, France
We propose a new laser based remote sensing methodology to evaluate the content of atmospheric trace gases. Its principle consists in coupling a lidar with the optical correlation spectroscopy (OCS-lidar). The theoretical and the numerical studies that we performed show that OCS-lidar is a robust methodology, allowing remote sensing of trace gases involved in environmental, agricultural and industrial plants surveys. The novelty of this work is threefold. First, we developed a new formalism to remotely evaluate the target gas concentration from optical correlation spectroscopy. Second, an acoustic optical programmable dispersive filter (AOPDF) has been used to ensure that the lidar signal is spectrally correlated with the gas of interest, here methane. It avoids using a hazardous gas reference cell, as operated in conventional OCS-devices. Moreover, a clever spectral correlation is achieved since the contribution of absorption interfering species can then be minimized. Third, to evaluate the performance of the OCS-lidar methodology, a numerical study on methane greenhouse gas is presented. It provides atmospheric methane mixing ratio from background level up to 10 ppb, within a 100 meters range resolution. Evaluation of the accuracy and the detection limit, including statistical and systematic errors assessment, are then objectively presented and discussed.
S1P-44
HIGH-RESOLUTION LIDAR MEASUREMENTS OF OZONE PROFILES IN THE
EQUATORIAL TROPOPAUSE REGION
Makoto Abo, Chikao Nagasawa, Yasukuni Shibata
Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino, Tokyo 191-006, Japan
Stratosphere-troposphere exchange is important for the budget of ozone in the lower stratosphere as well as in the troposphere. Upward transport occurs in the tropical region, but the exact mechanism controlling the transport is not clear. We found the top height of the stratospheric aerosol layer descend with time, synchronized with the QBO in the zonal wind. The QBO signals of the aerosol layer are noticed in the altitude range from 30 to 40 km. In addition, the tropospheric aerosol amount observed around the tropopause over equator is much more than at mid-latitudes. They suspect that this is an evidence of active material exchange between the troposphere and the stratosphere over the equatorial region. We are preparing DIAL (differential absorption lidar) system for high-resolution measurements of vertical ozone profiles in the equatorial tropopause region over Kototabang, Indonesia. We will contribute to the elucidation of the climate change by getting observational information about high resolution ozone density profiles, and the wave-propagation and material transportation using ozone as a tracer from the troposphere to the lower stratosphere over the equator.
S1P-45
RECONFIGURATION OF THE NOAA TOPAZ LIDAR FOR GROUND-BASED MEASUREMENT OF OZONE AND AEROSOL BACKSCATTER
Raul J. Alvarez1, Christoph J. Senff1,2, Ann M. Weickmann1,2, Scott P. Sandberg1, Andrew O. Langford1, Richard D. Marchbanks1,2, W. Alan Brewer1, R. Michael Hardesty1
1NOAA/ESRL, 325 Broadway, Boulder CO 80305, USA
2CIRES, University of Colorado, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
The NOAA Tunable Optical Profiler for Aerosol and oZone (TOPAZ) lidar is a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring ozone concentration and aerosol backscatter profiles that was originally designed for nadir-looking operation from an airborne platform. In order to expand the capabilities of this system, we have reconfigured the TOPAZ system for ground-based zenith-looking operation and have constructed an optical scanner to allow measurements at low pointing angles (0-30 degrees). In this new configuration, TOPAZ is capable of making measurements from ground level to several kilometers altitude with high vertical resolution near the ground. The (reversibly) reconfigured system has been installed in a truck and was deployed to the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) experiment in eastern Utah, USA. The TOPAZ lidar modifications and the new scanner are described, and data acquired in this new configuration are presented.
S1P-46
LIDAR DETECTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN VOLCANIC EMISSIONS
Luca Fiorani1, Wasan R. Saleh2, Michael Burton3, Laurent Hespel, Thierry Huet
1UTAPRAD-DIM, ENEA, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Italy
2ENEA guest with ICTP fellowship, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Italy
(permanent address: Physics Department, College of Science, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq)
3Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Via della Faggiola 32, 56126 Pisa, Italy
4ONERA, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse, France
Global warming induced by anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide is currently a major issue facing humanity. Improving our understanding of the natural CO2 cycle allows both a clearer forecast of the climatic response to perturbations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations in the future and better interpretations of the paleoclimate. While volcanic CO2 emissions are likely to be only 1% of anthropogenic emissions, there remains a large uncertainty on the volcanic contribution to the total CO2 flux, and therefore the natural carbon cycle. CO2-sensitive lidar instruments could be used to measure the distribution of CO2 in a volcanic plume, thereby allowing volcanic CO2 fluxes to be derived. The recently-begun ERC research project CO2VOLC aims to produce such a CO2 lidar. In this paper we investigate the optimal ON and OFF wavelengths to measure CO2 with lidar/DIAL, giving the preference to spectral regions where solid-state user-friendly laser sources are readily available, having in mind possible future airborne applications.






S1P-47
SCANNING UV LIDAR FOR EXPLOSIVES DETECTION
Sergey Mikhailovich Bobrovnikov1, Evgeny Vladimirovich Gorlov1, Viktor Ivanovich Zharkov1, Yury Nikolaevich Panchenko2
1V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS 1, Academician Zuev Sq., 634021, Tomsk, Russia
2Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS 2/3, Akademichesky Avenue, 634055, Tomsk, Russia
The paper presents the results of the research of possibility of remote detection explosives vapors in the atmosphere on the basis of lidar principle with the use of photofragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (PF/LIF) approach. The project of a mobile, autonomously operating and high-performance scanning UV lidar system for explosives detection at a distance of 10–50 m is described. Experimental data on detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and Composition-B vapors at a distance of 13 m at a temperature of 23°C in a real environment are presented.
S1P-48
SIMULID, PULSED FOCUSED LIDAR SIMULATION SOFTWARE
Mehdi Machta1, Jean-Pierre Cariou1, Matthieu Valla2
1Leosphere, 76 rue de Monceau, 75008, Paris, France
2Onera, Chemin de la Hunière et des Joncherettes, 91120 Palaiseau, France
The underlying principle of pulsed lidar measurement of wind and aerosols is the use of optical heterodyne (coherent) detection, in which laser pulses are transmitted into the atmosphere and scattered off of naturally-occurring small dust particles (aerosols) carried by the ambient flow field.  The measurement principle is well known and similar to pulsed radars. Based on various theoretical models, LEOSPHERE developed a “Virtual Pulsed Focused Doppler Lidar”: SIMULID based mainly on model developed in (VALLA, 2005). SIMULID is a handful, easy to use tool which simulates Lidars in order to predict their performance. It helps bettering their design and diagnosing existing systems problem. This paper will present the software architecture and its various utilities.
S1P-49
AUTOMATED, UNSUPERVISED INVERSION OF MULTIWAVELENGTH RAMAN LIDAR DATA: STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF MICROPHYSICAL PARAMETERS
Eduard Chemyakin1, Alexei Kolgotin2, Anton Romanov3, Detlef Müller4
1Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), 1 Enterprise Parkway, Hampton, VA, 23666, USA
2Physics Instrumentation Center, General Physics Institute, Troitsk, Moscow Region, 142190, Russia
3The National University of Science and Technology, Leninskiy Avenue 4, Moscow, 119049, Russia
4Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), NASA LaRC, 1 Enterprise Parkway, Hampton, VA, 23666, USA, and Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (IfT), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
The retrieval of microphysical particle properties requires the application of inversion algorithms. These algorithms are using as input parameters backscattering and extinction coefûcients collected with multiwavelength Raman lidar. Most of the algorithms are unstable because of the mathematical complexity of the inversion problem itself. Nowadays, to obtain reasonable retrieval accuracythe algorithms need to be operated by a person who is an expert in lidar data processing. The result of such operation strongly depends on the operator’s personal experience and the availability of additional information such as backward trajectories and other data about the possible origin of the observed particles. The limitations of such an expert-driven approach are clear. The number of multiwavelength Raman lidar stations is increasing and the lidar community is interested in going from episodic, user-driven retrieval scenarios to an automated analysis mode. The automated, unsupervised retrieval is also needed in view of future air-and space-borne multiwavelength lidar applications. Because of such future needs we conducted a large scale numerical simulation study that aimed at the retrieval accuracythat can be obtained for microphysical parameters using our inversion algorithm in an automated, unsupervised mode.
S1P-50
INFLUENCE OF THE UNCERTAINTY OF THE IMAGINARY PART OF THE REFRACTIVE INDEX ON THE RETRIEVAL ACCURACY OF PARTICLE SCATTERING AND ABSORPTION COEFFICIENTS AND SINGLE SCATTERING ALBEDO: NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS FOR THE CASE OF MULTIWAVELENGTH RAMAN LIDAR DATA
Alexei Kolgotin1, Eduard Chemyakin2, Anton Romanov3, Detlef Müller4
(1Physics Instrumentation Center, Troitsk, Moscow Region, 142190, Russia, kolgotin@mail.pic.troitsk.ru
2Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), 1 Enterprise Parkway, Hampton, VA, 23666, USA
3 The National University of Science and Technology, Leninskii av. 4, Moscow, 119049, Russia
4Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), NASA LaRC, 1 Enterprise Parkway, Hampton, VA, 23666, USA, and Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (IfT), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
Inversion algorithms are used to retrieve aerosol mi-crophysical parameters and the complex refractive index (CRI) from the inversion of multiwavelength lidar data. This study shows that the retrieval of the imaginary part (IP) of the CRI may be affected with large uncertainty. These uncertainties in turn may cause large uncertainties of aerosol optical properties such as single scattering albedo (SSA), and aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients. We investi-gated the sensitivity of estimating SSA, and scattering and absorption coefficients in dependence of the magnitude of the uncertainty of the CRI and errors of the optical data delivered by multiwavelength lidar measurements, respectively. Our results show that an uncertainty of the IP of up to 100 % can lead to a sim-ilar error level for the absorption coefficient. Scatter-ing coefficient and SSA can be estimated with an uncertainty similar to the accuracy of the extinction coefficient measured with Raman lidar.
S1P-51
ON THE DETERMINATION OF STRATOSPHERIC AEROSOL LAYERS
Frank Wagner and Jana Preißler
Centro de Geofísica, Universidade de Évora, Rua Romão Ramalho 59, 7000-671 Évora, Portugal
For the observation of stratospheric aerosol layers, a lidar signal above the noise level is needed. The calibration of a lidar signal using a molecular backscatter signal at stratospheric altitudes requires the unambiguous detection of aerosol layers in those height ranges. In this manuscript, a discussion of methods for the improvement of the signaltonoise ratio in lidar data is given. Although they are commonly known and used, literature often lacks a critical assessment of those methods. Averaging procedures, the background correction and the validation of lidar signals by means of molecular profiles are discussed. Those techniques are crucial for a meaningful investigation of stratospheric aerosol layers, as caused by volcanic eruptions, especially with lidar systems optimized for tropospheric studies.
S1P-52
ENHANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF SEMITRANSPARENT MEDIA
THROUGH APPLICATION OF POLARIZATION LIDAR
Steven Mitchell, Jeffrey P. Thayer
University of Colorado at Boulder, Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department, Boulder Colorado 80309, USA
A pulsed lidar system transmitting a single wavelength at 532 nm exploits scatter polarimetry of semi transparent media to optically isolate surfaces with differing polarization scattering properties. By simultaneously detecting co-polarized signals from the first surface and cross-polarized signals from the second surface, the depth of the medium can be resolved to distances less than the pulse resolution of the lidar system. The polarization measurements also enable further characterization of the medium by determining its depolarization properties.
S1P-53
AN INNOVATIVE LIDAR INSTRUMENT FOR MONITORING THE ATMOSPHERIC
PARTICULATE
Xuan Wang1,4, Antonella Boselli2,4, Gianluca Pisani3,4, Nicola Spinelli3,4, Valentino Tontodonato4
1CNISM and CNR-SPIN, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, 80126 Napoli, Italy
2 CNISM and IMAA-CNR - C.da S. Loja 85050 Tito Scalo, Potenza, Italy
3 CNISM and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche – Università di Napoli “Federico II” – 80126 Napoli
4 ALA Advanced Lidar Application srl Corso Meridionale N. 39, 80143 Napoli
FOLDBACK lidar, an innovative arrangement lidar instrument, is introduced in this paper. This new methodology, with respect to traditional lidars, allows using a low cost micro-joule laser sources and performing independent measurements of aerosol (atmospheric fine particulate) backscattering and extinction coefficients by using only elastic backscattering signals. It is suitable to be installed in urban area, above buildings, airports, and industrial areas. This new system makes use of a retro-reflector system to realize two counter-propagated laser beams and their elastic scattering lidar signals in one receiving system. From these two counter-propagated lidar signals, aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficients can be retrieved by using a proper developed algorithm and a calibration procedure. This compact, economic lidar system allows monitoring of a large area in real-time, day and night, and with high spatial resolution, sounding the sources of air pollution on horizontal direction. It can be equipped with automatic alignment and pointing capabilities. The system performance was verified through numerical simulation that allowed to synthesize the experimental signal and then to obtain profiles of the aerosol optical parameters by using suitable analysis algorithms. The results of simulation showed that optical parameters can be determined without further assumptions, with a spatial resolution of 10-50 m and a temporal resolution of 10 minutes over distances of several kilometers and with performances comparable in day and night measurement conditions. The combination of several wavelengths (from ultraviolet to infrared) measurements allows also obtaining the atmosphere particle size distribution, refraction index, and concentration.
S1P-54
MULTIWAVELENGTH RAMAN LIDAR CONSTRUCTION TO MONITOR
VOLCANIC ASH AND AEROSOLS IN BARILOCHE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT,
ARGENTINA
Ezequiel Pawelko1, Pablo Ristori1, Lidia Otero1,4, Raúl D’Elia4, Andrea Pereyra1, Osvaldo Vilar1, Fernando Chouza1, Juan Pallotta1, Francisco González1,Martín Fernandez3, Sebastián Lema3, Nobuo Sugimoto2, Eduardo Quel1
1 CEILAP, UNIDEF (MINDEF - CONICET), UMI-IFAECI-CNRS 3351, - Juan Bautista de La Salle 4397 -
B1603ALO Villa Martelli, Argentina
2 National Institute for Environmental Studies. Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
3 Servicio Meteorologico nacional, 25 de Mayo 658, C100ABN, CABA, Argentina
4 Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ, CABA, Argentina
A monitoring station of aerosols was installed at theairport in San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentina. The station consists of a new multiwavelengthlidar built by the Lidar Division of CEILAPto measure volcanic ash, a sunphotometer included inthe AERONET / NASA network and a nephelometer.The main objective is to provide information to helpaviation authorities the determination of the air trafficfeasibility, due to the presence of volcanic ash from thePuyehue volcano. The description of the instrument andsome results is presented.

S1P-55
PROFILING OF POORLY STRATIFIED SMOKY ATMOSPHERES WITH SCANNING LIDAR
Vladimir Kovalev, Cyle Wold, Alexander Petkov, and Wei Min Hao
Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Fire Sciences Laboratory, 5775 Hwy 10 West, Missoula, MT 59808, USA
The multiangle data processing technique is considered based on using the signal measured in zenith (or close to zenith) as a core source for extracting the information about the vertical atmospheric aerosol loading. The multiangle signals are used as the auxiliary data to extract the vertical transmittance profile from the zenith signal. Simulated and experimental data are presented that illustrate the advantages of this data processing technique.
S1P-56
MICROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF BURNING BIOMASS FROM RAMAN LIDAR
Christine Böckmann1, Lukas Osterloh1, Doina Nicolae2, Livio Belegante2
1Institute of Mathematics, Potsdam University, Am Neuen Palais 10, 14469 Potsdam, Germany
2Laser Remote Sensing Department, National Institute of R&D for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele,
Ilfov, Romania
Retrieving the distribution of aerosols in the atmosphere via remote sensing techniques is a highly complex task that requires dealing with a wide range of different problems stemming both from Physics and Mathematics. We focus on retrieving this distribution from multiwavelength lidar data for aerosol ensembles consisting of spherical particles via an iterative regularization technique. First, a critical point in the model, the assumed wavelength-dependence of the refractive index is studied with regard to its expected impact on the regularized solution. Second, we apply this technique to two interesting cases of aerosol layers from burning biomass measured over Bucharest.
S1P-57
PRELIMINARY STUDIES OF THE BACKSCATTERING OF INDUSTRIAL FLARE USING LIDAR TECHNIQUE IN CUBATAO, BRAZIL
Renata Facundes da Costa, E. Landulfo, W. M. Nakaema, R. Bourayou, P. F. Moreira, R. Guardani
Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, Brazil.
The major motivation of this work is to understand how particles scatter and absorb light in a ûame of an industrial ûare by means of lidar measurements. The technique brings positive perspectives to overcome the difûculties associated with in situ noninvasive monitoring of industrial atmospheric emissions in oil reûning facilities. The results shown in this text represent the ûrst part of a study aimed at developing a method for in situ estimation of particle size and number density in industrial ûares based on scattering measurements. As a ûrst approximation, soot particles were modeled as Mie scatterers in order to derive the parameters of their assumed log-normal size distribution under the heuristic hypothesis of a uniform volumetric fraction. The effect of the uncertain value of the refractive index of soot on the retrieval is also being discussed.
S1P-58
MULTI-ELEMENT MONITORING OF LIVINGSPHERE WITH LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE SPECTRUM (LIFS) LIDAR
Yasunori Saito, Kazuki Kobayashi, Takeshi Ootani
Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, Wakasato 4-17-1, Nagnao City, Nagano 380-8553, Japan
We have developed a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum (LIFS) lidar to investigate the “livingsphere” in which strong relations exist between human life and the natural environment. LIF spectra of materials in the elements that make up the livingsphere (i.e., the atmosphere, rivers and lakes, soil, and plants) were monitored by the LIFS lidar. It was suggested that LIF spectrum of soil could be a standard to understand LIF spectrum in various elements of the livingsphere. Several phenomena that occur in the livingsphere are discussed based on LIF spectral data in terms of their impact on human life.
S1P-59
DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT AND UNATTENDED MICROPULSE LIDAR
IN QINGDAO, CHINA
Zhangjun Wang, Libin Du, Junle Qu, Bin Lv, Jie Liu, and Chengxuan Wu
Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Ocean Environment Monitoring Technology,
Institute of Oceanographic Instrumentation, Shandong Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, Shandong, 266001, China
A micropulse lidar (MPL) system is being developed by Shandong Academy of Sciences Institute of Oceanographic Instrumentation (SDIOI) to study and investigate structural and optical properties of clouds and aerosols. It is being built using commercially available, off the shelf, components. The transmitter is based on a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser which delivers up to 6 ¼J pulse energy at a pulse repetition rate of 2.5 kHz. The receiver utilizes a commercial 20-cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, a 0.5 nm narrowband interference filter, and a photon counting PMT detector. It is cheap and will enable the development of a network of instruments measuring aerosol and visibility in real time. A brief overview of the structure and specifications of the lidar is presented.
S1P-60
MULTIPLE-PATH LIDAR VIBROMETER FOR REMOTE MODAL STUDY OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BUILDINGS
Matthieu Valla1, Julien Totems1, Béatrice Augère1, Didier Goular1, Christophe Planchat1, Didier Fleury1, Claudine Besson1, Philippe Guégen2
1ONERA, Chemin de la Hunière et des Joncherettes, 91120 Palaiseau, France
2ISTerre, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble CEDEX 9, France
Coherent lidars are able to finely measure the vibration velocity of remote targets. This allows Operative Modal Analysis of potentially damaged buildings, for their diagnosis at a safe distance after a seismic event. As a next step from our previous work validating this method for modal frequency determination, we have assessed its capability to extract the full modal parameters of reinforced concrete buildings, including mode shapes, using multiple ambient vibrations measurements by lidar on the entire structure. We report on the development and field trial of a 3-path lidar vibrometer for this purpose. After a description of the system, we show that application-related constraints are fulfilled: low velocity noise, real-time signal processing, and compacity and laser safety. Then, we present the results of a real-scale trial on a building at ONERA Palaiseau, France. We discuss the reliability of this technique for remote seismic integrity structural diagnosis.
S1P-61
AUTOMATIC LASER RADAR SYSTEMS FOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING IN PROCESS INDUSTRIES
Simona Sasso, Claudio Lofrumento
Agenzia Regionale per la prevenzione e Protezione Ambientale (ARPA) Regione Puglia, 70126 Bari, Italy
In the view of the environmental protection, it has been studied an integrated approach for the management of air pollution monitoring networks serving complex industries. In particular, the present work concern the implementation of the civil monitoring network with those of a refinery plant located in Taranto. The project aimed at integrated management of civil monitoring platform with that of an industry of refinery, appropriately sized for detection of specific environmental parameters. The laser systems have been evaluated for their suitability particularly relative at the detection and control of air pollution. In fact, they allow to measure aerosol and gaseous pollutants concentrations also to a few kilometers from the measurement point. These instruments calculate industrial fumes, they check losses from plants and they measure parameters such as SO2, NO2, HF, HCl, Cl2, CO, NO, NH3 and hydrocarbons. The present study evaluated the implementation of an integrated monitoring and exchange of environmental information real time with industries to link environmental monitoring results at operational and management systems and to provide a concrete response to acute pollution events generated from industrial plants.
S1P-62
Improvement on LIDAR date calibration for upper atmospheric measurements of wide dynamics luminous signals
Sai Guan, Guotao Yang, Xuewu Cheng, Yong Yang, Jihong Wang, Xiaoxi Zhang
State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, China
For lidar sounding of wide atmospheric dynamic ranges, as in middle and upper atmospheric probing, photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector nonlinear photo-counting effects and signal-induced noise (SIN) superimposed on the tail of lidar signals represent a fundamental problem that complicates the extraction of information from lidar date. In this article, Improvements on experimental simulating lidar signals affected by PMT are reported to evaluate the receiver PMTs used in our Dual-Wavelength Rayleigh/Sodium High Altitude Detecting lidar system. Three different types of PMTs have been tested and their responses to pulsed light signals of various duration and amplitude, comparable with real lidar return, have been studied. Computer simulation quantitatively revealed that SIN is found to be a linear combination of two exponentially decaying functions. Based on the results of experimental data and simulation, a proposal was made to find a new practical method for identifying and removing the SIN from the real lidar signals. In addition, a new practical method for nonlinear photo-counting calibration is proposed by taking into account PMTs and High Speed Data Acquisition Card as a whole black-box. Validity of these methods was demonstrated by using them retrieving atmospheric density, temperature and sodium absolutely number density, in comparation with satellite date.
S1P-63
Status Report on the design and assembly of a prototype HSRL
for EAS air fluorescence telescopes
Prodromos Fetfatzis, Emmanouel Fokitis, Stavros Maltezos, Nikos Maragos, Ioannis Manthos, Agelika Georgakopoulou, Violeta Gika
Physics Department, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Zografou, Greece
In this work, we shortly give a phenomenological approximation for a proposed design of a High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) prototype for Extended Air Shower (EAS) experiments. The objectives of this work are to) reduce the measurement errors for the optical depth of aerosols and lidar ratio the order of 5%, 2) record the molecular component of the scattering and avoid relying to atmospheric models, 3) perform experimental evaluation of the aerosol phase function as well as of the molecular scattering phase function using a bistatic HSRL configuration. In addition, our designed system may able to provide information on atmospheric parameters such as temperature, wind velocity, mainly due to the spectral analysis of the scattering return from molecules by exploiting the Cabannes lines. The system we propose consists of two Fabry-Perot channels that analyze the spectrum of scattered signal and record the interference pattern on CCD cameras. Through this interferometric analysis the Mie and Rayleigh scattering components can relatively be experimentally determined.






Tuesday, 26 June 2012

Oral Presentations 08:30-17:45

Keynote Talk

The Science of Climate Change: The Research Challenges
Donald J. Wuebbles
University of Illinois, Illinois, USA
Scientific evidence indicates that human activities are playing a significant role in major changes occurring in the Earth’s climate system. Significant changes in climate, the long-term averages and variations of weather, are projected for the rest of the 21st Century and beyond. The scientific analyses also strongly indicate that the globally-averaged temperature charges are being largely driven by changing atmospheric concentrations of radiatively important gases and particles, lending credence to concerns about much larger changes in temperature, precipitation, and in the likelihood for severe weather events over the coming decades. Measurements at the Earth’s surface, in the atmosphere, and oceans, including those from lidars, radars, aircraft, satellites, and other systems are all extremely important to understanding the changes in climate and the basic processes underlying those changes. Numerical models of the Earth-atmosphere climate system are also key tools to both understanding the past changes in climate and to making the projections for the future that are necessary for planning and policy purposes. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the science underlying the concerns about climate change, the potential concerns to humanity and ecosystems that may result from these changes, and the importance of research in addressing these issues.


Session 3O:
Aerosol characterization – Clouds – Radiative properties
Co-Chairs: Ulla Wandinger, Adolfo Comeron, Dimitrios Balis, Albert Ansmann, Vassilis Amiridis, Eduardo Landulfo, Chris Hostetler, Igor Veselovskii
S3O-01 - Invited Talk

AEROSOL-CLOUD INTERACTION, A NOTORIOUS SOURCE OF UNCERTAINTIES IN CLIMATE RESEARCH: ROLE OF LIDAR IN LIQUID-WATER AND MIXED-PHASE CLOUD STUDIES
Albert Ansmann, Patric Seifert, Johannes Bühl, Thomas Kanitz, Ronny Engelmann, and Dietrich Althausen
Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
The potential of ground–based lidar to contribute to research of layered clouds in the lower and middle troposphere is discussed. Emphasis is put on the important process of heterogeneous ice formation. Lidar–based statistics of liquid and mixed–phase clouds observed at clean southern and polluted northern mid-latitudes, and the tropics are compared and discussed. Simultaneous observations of polarization lidar and Doppler lidar (vertical wind observations) offer the opportunity to better separate meteorological aspects and aerosol effects in cloud evolution and ice formation. Recent activities in this field of lidar observations are discussed in addition.
S3O-02
WATER CLOUD MEASUREMENT USING RAMAN LIDAR TECHNIQUE: CURRENT UNDERSTANDING AND FUTURE WORK
Tetsu Sakai1, Felicita Russo2, David N. Whiteman3, David Turner4, Igor Veselovskii5, S. Harvey Melfi3, Raymond Hoff6 and Tomohiro Nagai1
1Meteorological Research Institute, 1-1 Nagamine, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0052, Japan
2ISAC / Italian National Research Council, Via Gobetti, 101, 40129 Bologna, Italy
3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA
4 NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory, 120 David L Boren Blvd, Norman, OK 73072, USA
5Physics Instrumentation Center, General Physics Institute, Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190, Russia
6University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore MD 21250, USA
This paper describes the current state of our research into the Raman liquid water cloud measurement technique. We describe the results of spectroscopic measurements acquired at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and analysis of data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site of the U. S. Department of Energy. The range resolved spectral measurements indicate that the backscattering spectra measured in and below low clouds at NASA GSFC on November 15, 2011, agree well with theoretical spectra for vapor and liquid water. A small enhancement may be observed due to aerosol fluorescence. The calibration coefficients of the liquid water measurement for the Raman lidar at the ARMSGP site were determined by comparisons with the liquid water path (LWP) obtained with Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the liquid water content (LWC) obtained with the millimeter wavelength cloud radar and water vapor radiometer (MMCR-WVR). Areas requiring further research in this technique include study of the influence of aerosol fluorescence on the Raman measurements and linearity of the lidar signals during the rapid decay as clouds are penetrated.
S3O-03
CORRELATED MEASUREMENTS OF HUMIDITY AND EXTINCTION IN CIRRUS CLOUDS BY AIRBORNE LIDAR
Martin Wirth, Silke Groß, Andreas Fix, Ehret Gerhard
\Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Institut für Physik der Atmosphäre, Münchner Str. 20, 82234 Wessling, Germany
During the first mission of the new German research aircraft HALO, the combined aerosol and water vapor LIDAR WALES made extensive combined measurements of humidity and cloud optical thickness in the vicinity and, for the first time, within fully developed cirrus clouds. A comparison with joint in-situ measurements carried out on synchronous flights with DLR’s Falcon F20 aircraft showed that the main variability in relative humidity over ice was caused by fluctuations of water vapor concentration and not by temperature fluctuations. This validated the use of numerical weather prediction temperature data to convert the absolute humidity, as measured by the LIDAR, to relative humidity. In this way high resolution joint distributions of relative humidity over ice and cloud optical thickness within cirrus could be established for the first time. For this task the extended vertical range of HALO was indispensable as it enabled the LIDAR system to keep its minimum distance to the cloud tops which reached up to 13 km during this mission.
S3O-04
LIDAR BACKSCATTERING BY QUASI-HORIZONTALLY ORIENTED HEXAGONAL ICE PLATES
Anatoli Borovoi1, Alexander Konoshonkin1, Natalia Kustova1, Hajime Okamoto2
1V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Rus. Acad. Sci., 1, Academician Zuev Sq., Tomsk 634021, Russia
2Kyushu University, Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, 6-1 Kasuga-koen Kasuga-city, Fukuoka 816-8580, Japan
Three values measured by the spaceborne lidar CALIPSO, i.e. backscattering coefficient, color ratio and depolarization ratio, have been calculated within the framework of physical optics for quasi-horizontally oriented hexagonal ice plates. The dependence of these values on the effective deviation of crystal orientations is obtained for the case of normal incidence of light and axially symmetric distribution of crystal orientations. Such results are applicable for the data obtained by CALIPSO at the initial tilt of its axis at 0.3° from nadir.
S3O-05
MID-LATITUDE CIRRUS ANALYSIS WITH LIDARS: CLUSTERING
AND MATCH APPROACH
Davide Dionisi1,2, Philippe Keckhut2, Christophe Hoareau2, Nadège Montoux3, Fernando Congeduti1
1Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate-CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma, Italy
2Laboratoire ATmosphères, Milieux, Observations Spatiales, Versailles St-Quentin University, CNRS/INSU, UMR8190, 11, boulevard d'Alembert, 78280 Guyancourt, France
3Laboratoire de Météorologie Physique, Blaise Pascal University /CNRS /OPGC -UMR 6016, les Cezeaux, 24 Avenue des Landais, 63177 Aubiere, France
A review of the recent and on going works about the characterization of mid-latitude cirrus through two advanced multi-channel lidar systems, located in the Mediterranean area, is presented. These systems, at the Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP, 43.9° N, 5.7° E) in France and at Rome Tor Vergata (RTV, 41.8° N, 12.6° E) in Italy, observe cirrus in operational or semi-operational mode. A statistical approach has been used to derive cirrus classification (and climatology) over the period 1996-2007 for OHP lidar measurements. Similarly, a preliminary cirrus classification has been performed on RTV lidar data for three years period and compared to the French one. Finally a study to assess the feasibility of a future observing strategy that couples lidar measurements to a Match approach has been conducted to characterize cirrus optical properties using both the French and the Italian site. A case of upper tropospheric thin cirrus advection has been identified and studied through this approach.
S3O-06
RAMAN BACKSCATTER-COEFFICIENT SPECTRA OF CIRRUS ICE
Jens Reichardt
Richard-Aßmann-Observatorium, Deutscher Wetterdienst, Am Observatorium 12, 15848 Lindenberg, Germany
For simultaneous measurements of water in its gaseous and condensed phases, a spectrometer has been added to RAMSES, the Raman lidar for moisture sensing of the German Meteorological Service. The spectrometer is coupled to the far-range receiver with a fiber bundle, and consists of a Czerny-Turner spectrograph (500 mm focal length) and a 32-channel single photon-counting detection system based on a multi-anode photomultiplier. During a typical measurement (with a transmitter wavelength of 355 nm), the spectrum between 385 and 410 nm is recorded with a spectral resolution of 0.8 nm; the spatial resolution is 15 m, the height range 15 km. In this contribution, the techniques are outlined that are applied to calibrate the spectrum measurement and to ensure that fluorescence does not contribute as a source of error. Also, vibrational Raman spectra of cirrus particles are reported for the first time. Spectrum-integrated ice backscatter coefficients of up to 2.8 Em_1sr_1 have been measured. The ice data obtained so far do not suggest a simple relation between ice backscatter coefficient and cirrus optical properties such as the extinction coefficient.
S3O-07
DETERMINATION OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES WITH
DUAL-FIELD-OF-VIEW RAMAN LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Jörg Schmidt1, UllaWandinger1, Aleksey V. Malinka2, Johannes Bühl1
1Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany,
2BI Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Science of Belarus, Pr. Nezavisimosti 68, Minsk 220072, Belarus
Dual-ûeld-of-view Raman lidar measurements are performed with the lidar MARTHA (Multiwavelength Atmospheric Raman Lidar for Temperature, Humidity and Aerosol Proûling) at the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (IfT) in Leipzig, Germany. Light that is scattered in forward direction by cloud droplets and inelastically backscattered by N2 molecules is simultaneously detected with two different ûelds of view (FOVs). An inversion algorithm is used to derive proûles of the effective droplet radius, extinction coefûcient, and liquid-water content (LWC) of the investigated clouds. Case studies are presented illustrating the effect of aerosol properties as well as vertical wind speed on cloud microphysical properties. Furthermore, a case study comparing the retrieved liquid-water path (LWP) with corresponding measurements of a microwave radiometer (MWR) is presented, which constitutes a veriûcation of the retrieved cloud properties.

S3O-08 - Invited Talk

INTEGRATED REMOTE-SENSING TECHNIQUES TO STUDY AEROSOLS, CLOUDS, AND THEIR INTERACTION
Ulla Wandinger, Patric Seifert, Janet Wagner, Ronny Engelmann, Johannes Bühl, Jörg Schmidt, Birgit Heese, Holger Baars, Anja Hiebsch, Thomas Kanitz, Dietrich Althausen, Albert Ansmann
Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
We present an overview of combined remote-sensing techniques to study aerosol and cloud processes in the troposphere. Advanced multiwavelength Raman lidars with polarization, multiple-ûeld-of-view, water-vapor, and temperature measurement capabilities in synergy with Doppler lidar, cloud radar, and passive remote-sensing instruments such as sun photometer and microwave radiometer allow an in-depth investigation of aerosols and clouds, together with the properties of the atmospheric environment in which they develop and interact. Novel synergistic algorithms afford the retrieval of microphysical parameters of aerosol particles and hydrometeors. Applied in dedicated ûeld campaigns and large-scale networks such as the European Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network ACTRIS, the combined observational techniques provide new insight into complex interaction processes of aerosols, clouds, and atmospheric dynamics.







S3O-09
ALGORITHM AND SOFTWARE FOR THE RETRIEVAL OF VERTICAL AEROSOL PROPERTIES USING COMBINED LIDAR/RADIOMETER DATA: DISSEMINATION IN EARLINET
Anatoli Chaikovsky1, Oleg Dubovik2, Philippe Goloub2, Didier Tanré2, Gelsomina Pappalardo3, Ulla Wandinger4, Ludmila Chaikovskaya1, Sergei Denisov1, Yan Grudo1, Anton Lopatsin1,2, Yana Karol1,2, Tatyana Lapyonok2, Michail Korol1, Fiodor Osipenko1, Dzmitry Savitski1, Alexander Slesar1, Arnoud Apituley5, Lucas Alados Arboledas6, Ioannis Binietoglou3, Panayotis Kokkalis7, María José Granados Muñoz6, Alexandros Papayannis7, Maria Rita Perrone8, Aleksander Pietruczuk9, Gianluca Pisani10, Francesc Rocadenbosch11, Michaël Sicard11, Ferdinando De Tomasi8, Janet Wagner4, Xuan Wang10
1Institute of Physics, NAS of Belarus, 68, Nezalezhnosty ave., 220072, Minsk, Belarus
2LOA, Universite de Lille, Lille, France
3Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto di Metodologie per l'Analisi Ambientale (CNR IMAA), Potenza, Italy
4Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig, Germany
5KNMI - Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, The Netherlands
6Andalusian Center for Environmental Research (CEAMA), University of Granada – Autonomous Government of Andalusia, Granada, Spain
7National Technical University of Athens, Department of Physics, Athens, Greece
8Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze Fisiche della Materia (CNISM ) and Universita' del Salento,Lecce, Italy
9Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland
10Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze Fisiche della Materia, Napoli, Italy
11Universitat Polit¸cnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
Ten combined lidar and sun-radiometer stations in the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) have been testing technique and software for retrieving aerosol microstructure parameters from coordinated lidar and sun-radiometer data with the aim of creating new type of routing cooperative observations. The paper presents description of a program package and preliminary results of testing measurements at some stations.
S3O-10
EVALUATION OF A COMBINED LIDAR AND SUNPHOTOMETER RETRIEVAL ALGORITHM TO DETERMINE AEROSOL MICROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES
Janet Wagner1, Ulla Wandinger1, Albert Ansmann1, Patric Seifert1, Anatoli P. Chaikovsky2
1Leibniz-Institut f¨ur Troposph¨arenforschung, Leipzig, Germany
2Institute of Physics, National Academy of Science, Minsk, Belarus
To assess information about the optical, microphysical, and radiative properties of aerosol particles the lidar techniqueand sunphotometers are commonly used. Informationthat result from both lidar and sunphotometerdata can provide a distinct image of the vertical aerosolproperties. The algorithm developd at the Institute ofPhysics of the National Academy of Science of Belarus (IPNASB) uses lidar measurements at the three wavelengths 355, 532, and 1064 nm and mean backscatter andextinction coefficients retrieved from radiometric data toobtain profiles of fine-mode and coarse-mode concentrations.At IfT Leipzig the IPNASB algorithm was testedfor specific aerosol situations. The case of a strong Saharandust outbreak in May 2008 is presented. The obtainedbackscatter and extinction profiles are in accordance withprofiles determined with the Klett method. Values of thelidar ratio, the Ångström exponent, and the particle depolarizationratio agree well with the results of differentstudies. It can be concluded that the retrieved concentrationprofiles of fine-mode and coarse-mode particlescontain reliable information about the amount and typeof aerosols in different height ranges.


S3O-11
RETRIEVING FINE AND COARSE MODE EXTINCTION COEFFICIENT PROFILES FROM LIDAR AND SUNPHOTOMETRY SYNERGY
David Daou1, Norman T. O'Neill1, Kevin Strawbridge2, Michael Travis2
1CARTEL, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, J1K 2R1, Canada
2Environment Canada, 6248 Eighth Line, R.R. #1, Egbert, Canada
Backscatter lidar profiles from the CORALNet lidar network and aerosol optical depths (AODs) from the AEROCAN / AERONET network were acquired during the summer of 2009 at two different locations Egbert (Ontario) and Sherbrooke (Québec). We introduce a technique for retrieving total, fine and coarse mode extinction coefficient profiles from lidar backscatter coefficient profiles and sunphotometry retrievals. The sunphotometry retrievals are employed to estimate the intensive parameter of lidar ratio and hence the extinction coefficient profiles for all three aerosol modes. Preliminary results show a degree of physical coherency in the retrievals accompanied by various artifactual problems.
S3O-12
AEROSOL SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION DURING DRAGON EXPERIMENT AS SEEN BY A MOBILE GROUND-BASED LIDAR-SUNPHOTOMETER SYSTEM PRELIMINARY RESULTS
Augustin Mortier1, Philippe Goloub1, Brent Holben2, Thierry Podvin1, Luc Blarel1, Christian Verwaerde1, Yana Karol1,3, Ilya Slutsker2, Jean-Yves Balois1, Didier Tanre1, Timothy Berkoff4, Stephane Victori5, Richard Mathieu5 
1LOA, Université de Lille, UFR de Physique, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
2GSFC/NASA, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA
3Institute of Physics, NAS of Belarus, 68, Nezalezhnosty ave., 220072, Minsk, Belarus
4Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County, NASA-GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771, USA
5CIMEL Electronique, Paris, France
The DRAGON (Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks)-USA experiment was held during summer 2011 in the Baltimore/ Washington region and operated in conjunction with NASA’s DISCOVER-AQ campaign. A network of 40 AERONET sun-photometers was deployed during field activities that included overflights by two different research aricraft during the month of July. In this context, a ground-based mobile LIDAR-sunphotometer developed by LOA and operated jointly with GSFC performed several transects through Baltimore/Washington DC area. The paper presents preliminary results of aerosol spatial and temporal variability as retrieved from mobile ground-based LIDAR-sunphotometer observations.
S3O-13
OPTICAL AND MICROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES FROM RAMAN LIDAR AND DEPOLARIZATION DATA
Christine Böckmann1, Lukas Osterloh1, Tom Rother2, Ilya Serikov3, Holger Linne3, Stefan Kinné3
1Institute of Mathematics, Potsdam University, Am Neuen Palais 10, 14469 Potsdam, Germany,
2German Aerospace Center (DLR), Remote Sensing Technology Institute, Neustrelitz, Germany
3MPI-Meteorology, Bundesstrasse 53, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
First, we propose a two-dimensional model to retrieve spheroidal particle distributions, depending not only on the size parameter but also on the aspect ratio, and microphysical particle properties from Raman lidar and depolarization proûles in contrast to conventional procedures. Since the problem is ill-posed in nature we use an appropriate iterative regularization technique. Second, this method is applied to a measurement scenario of Saharan dust from the Barbados lidar station which shows good results, in particular, in using additionally depolarization proûles. Two-dimensional (2D) volume distribution and microphysical properties are retrieved via inversion.

S3O-14
RETRIEVAL OF HEIGHT-TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF PARTICLE PARAMETERS FROM MULTI-WAVELENGTH LIDAR MEASUREMENTS DURING DISCOVER-AQ 2011 CAMPAIGN
Igor Veselovskii1, David N. Whiteman2, Alexey Kolgotin1, Michael Korenskiy1, Daniel Perez-Ramirez2,3
1Optosystems, Physics Instrumentation Center, Troitsk, Moscow Region, 142190, Russia
2Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA
3Applied Physics Department, University of Granada, 18071, Granada, Spain
An algorithm for linear estimation (LE) of aerosol bulk properties such as particle volume and complex refractive index from multiwavelength lidar measurements was applied to the results obtained during the DISCOVER-AQ 2011 campaign. As an example, the retrieval of time-sequences of the bulk particle parameters on the night of 21 June 2011 is given. The particle volume density shows strong variation while the effective radius remains approximately constant at a value of 0.2 µm. The real part of the refractive index shows a slight decreasing tendency in the region of enhanced extinction coefficient, which could be due to the uptake of water by the particles. The retrieved values of effective radius and complex refractive index are in a good agreement with the results provided by AERONET.
S3O-15
GEOMETRICAL, OPTICAL AND MICROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS IN NORTHERN INDIA
Elina Giannakaki1,2, Tero Mielonen1, Kimmo Korhonen1, Heikki Lihavainen3, Anti-Pekka Hyvärinen3, Detlef Müller4,5,6, Holger Baars4, Ronny Engelmann4, Dietrich Althausen4, T.S. Panwar7, Rakesh Hooda3,7, Ved Prakash Sharma7, Kari E. J. Lehtinen1,8, Yrjö Viisanen3 and Mika Komppula1
1Finnish Meteorological Institute, Kuopio Unit, Kuopio, FI-70211, Finland
2Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
3Finnish Meteorological Institute, P.O.Box 503, FI-00101, Helsinki, Finland
4Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318, Leipzig, Germany
5Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Korea
6now at: Science and Systems Applications, Inc. NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA, USA
7The Energy and Resource Institute, Darbari Seth Block, IHC Complex, Lodhi Road, 110 003, New Delhi, India
8University of Eastern Finland, Department of Applied Physics, P.O.Box 1627, FI-70211, Kuopio, Finland
In this study we present multi-wavelength lidar observations which were carried out in Northern India on 13th of July 2008. We have analyzed lidar profiles in regard to geometrical features, optical and microphysical properties of well-defined aerosol layers. Particle optical depths of 0.53 and 0.37 were measured for heights above 1 km at 355 and 532 nm, respectively. Above the polluted marine boundary layer, lofted plumes were found up to 4 km height. The lidar ratio was between 45 and 70 sr at 355 nm. The Ångström exponent related to backscatter (355/532 nm) ranged from 1 to 1.6. Effective particle radii ranged between 0.2 and 0.35 µm for pollution plumes above 1.5 km height. Larger particles are observed below 1.5 km, with particle effective radii ranging between 0.4 and 0.5 µm, possibly due to the contribution of maritime aerosols. The single-scattering albedo at 532 nm ranged from 0.78±0.12 to 0.87± 0.15 for the atmospheric layers above 1.5 km, while larger values of 0.95±0.07 and 0.99±0.02 were found for the lower atmospheric layers.




S3O-16
NON-SPHERICAL PARTICLES OPTICAL PROPERTIES USING SCATTERING MATRIX AND POLARIZATION LIDAR
Grégory David, Benjamin Thomas, Alain Miefre and Patrick Rairoux
Laboratoire de Spectrométrie Ionique et Moléculaire, CNRS, UMR 5579 Université Lyon 1, 10 rue Ada Byron, 69622 Villeurbanne, France
Non-spherical particles, such as volcanic ash or desert dust particles play a key role in the Earth’s climate. After long-range transport from a source region, these particles are highly dispersed and aged and the aerosol cloud (a) is a mixture of both spherical (s) and non-spherical (ns) particles. In this contribution, we address the non-spherical particles content in the low troposphere after long-range transport, by combining scattering matrix formalism with a sensitive and accurate UV-polarization lidar experiment. The scattering matrix formalism, suitable for both s and nsparticles, has been developed for a mixed aerosol cloud (a) = {s, ns}. It is shown that this formalism allows interpreting the observed Lidar polarization vertical profiles at Lyon (France). We then propose a new methodology to remotely evaluate the ns-particles number concentration in the troposphere. Two case studies of long-range transport are analyzed: on volcanic ash particles (released from the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption) and on desert dust particles (originating from a July 2010 dust episode). We believe his methodology to be robust, easily applicable and nsparticles specific, which is new.
S3O-17
HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR DEVELOPMENTS AND APPLICATIONS AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER
Chris A. Hostetler1, Richard A. Ferrare1, Johnathan W. Hair1, Anthony L. Cook1, David B. Harper1, Terry Mack2, Craig S. Cleckner1, Sharon P. Burton1, Raymond R. Rogers1, Michael D. Obland1, Richard J. Hare1, Amy Jo Scarino3, Carolyn Butler3, Yongxiang Hu1, Detlef Müller3, Eduard Chemyakin4, Dong Liu4
1NASA Langley Research Center, MS 420, Hampton, VA 23681, USA
2Lockheed-Martin, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681, USA
3Science Systems and Applications, Inc., 1 Enterprise Parkway, Suite 200, Hampton, VA 23666, USA
4Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, VA 23681,USA
Our group at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has been engaged in the development and deployment of High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) instruments and advancing HSRL science applications.  We completed our first instrument, referred to as HSRL-1, in 2004 and have deployed it on the LaRC King Air aircraft on 18 field campaigns starting in 2006. These campaigns have focused on aerosol and aerosol-cloud process studies, air quality studies, and satellite instrument validation. We are currently modifying HSRL-1 to enable ocean profiling in addition to the atmospheric measurements.  Our team is also developing a more advanced instrument, referred to as HSRL-2, which is designed to be a prototype for the lidar planned for NASA’s Aerosol-Clouds-Ecosystems (ACE) mission.  In this paper, we discuss both airborne instruments, some of the many applications of the data products, and our future plans for airborne and spaceborne lidar applications.





S3O-18
AIRBORNE AND GROUND MEASUREMENTS WITH A HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR
Bruce Morley1, Scott M. Spuler1, I. A. Razenkov2,3, Jothiram Vivekanandan1, Edwin W. Eloranta2
1National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3450 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO, USA
2University of Wisconsin, 1225 W. Dayton St., Madison, WI, USA
3Wave Propagation Lab, Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk, Russia
A high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) has been built by the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW) for the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Gulfstream-V (GV) aircraft-GVHSRL. The instrument was test ûown in February 2010 and operated from a customized intermodal container (6.1 m) beginning in September 2010. We will present GVHSRL ground-based data taken from this container located near NCAR s Foothills laboratory complex. The ûrst airborne deployment of GVHSRL was on the Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogen species and Oxygenated VOC project (TORERO) in January and February of 2012. We will also present data examples taken during this ûeld program.
S3O-19
DISCOVER-AQ: DETERMINING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SATELLITE RETRIEVED COLUMN AOD, EXTINCTION PROFILES, AND SURFACE PM2.5
Raymond M. Hoff1, Timothy Berkoff1, Ruben Delgado1, Patricia Sawamura1, Richard Ferrare2, John Hair2, Chris Hostetler2, Ray Rogers2, Mike Obland2, Bruce Anderson2, James Crawford2, and Brent Holben3
1Physics Department and Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
2NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA 23681-2199, USA
3 Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771, USA
The Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) Mission is a five-year multisite experiment to better understand the relationship between satellite measured variables (columnar) with surface concentrations, required for air quality assessment and regulation. The first DISCOVER-AQ experiment was held in the Baltimore-Washington urban corridor during July 2011 and involved fourteen lidars and two aircraft to provide the vertical profiles needed to close the vertical column with surface measurements. As of December 2011, DISCOVER-AQ data is now available to the public for analysis. Here we briefly sketch principal findings from the HSRL and ground-lidar contribution to the experiment in the generation of spatially and temporally varied: extinction profiles, detection of PBL heights, and closure on surface PM2.5. In twelve days of coincident lidar and aircraft profiles, HSRL and ground-lidar extinction profiles agreed within the error estimates of the two methods. Multiple types of Micropulse Lidars (MPL) and UMBC’s elastic lidar system (ELF) provided extinction profiles, based on column closure to coincident AOD from sunphotometer and a constant lidar ratio. The spatially distributed lidars showed variability in the PBL height across this complex urban-estuarine environment that was modified by bay-breeze circulations.





S3O-20
AEROSOL LAYER DECOUPLING IN THE NORTHERN SOUTH CHINA SEA PROFILED BY
MPLNET LIDAR DURING THE SPRING 2010 DONGSHA ISLAND EXPERIMENT
Simone Lolli1, Sheng-Hsiang Wang3, Ellsworth Judd Welton2, James Campbell4, Brent Holben2
1UMBC-NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt 20771, MD, USA
2NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA
3Department of Atmospheric Sciences, National Central University, Chung-Li, Taiwan
4U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, CA, USA
Measurements of aerosol particle optical properties and cloud vertical distributions were collected at Dongsha Island (20°42'52" N, 116°43'51" E) in the northern South China Sea (SCS) during spring 2010 with an autonomous and continuously running 0.355 um polarization lidar. The measurements, together with backward trajectories analysis depict simultaneous near-surface aerosol particle transport and the emergence a significant elevated layer (3-4 km) caused by upwind biomass burning on 22-23 March. Our results help characterize how springtime emissions from both China and Southeast Asia impact aerosol loading and optical properties over the northern SCS. Also the complex vertical distribution of aerosol particles, and their interaction with clouds, has implications for remote-sensing observations and aerosol/cloud radiation processes. This study is conducted as part of the 7SEAS (the Seven South East Asian Studies) project, focused on characterizing aerosol source origins, transport processes, and vertical distributions of Asian continental outflow in South East Asia. Moreover, the paper represents a preliminary effort of the NASA MPLNET team for integrating a commercial UV Lidar and its datasets as part of the global federated instrument network.
S3O-21
Dust aerosol profiling by ground-based and airborne lidar in the framework of FENNEC
Patrick Chazette1, Cyrille Flamant2, Philippe Royer1,3, Fabien Marnas1,2, Cécile Kocha2, Pascal Genau2, Pascal Doira1, Diduer Bruneau2, Jacques Pelon2, Joseph Sanak1
1Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France
2Laboratoire Atmosphères Milieux Observations Spatiales (LATMOS), Laboratoire mixte CNRS-UVSQ-UPMC, UMR 8190, Université Paris 6, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris, France
3Leosphere, 76 rue Monceau, 75008 Paris, France
The FENNEC program aims to improve our knowledge of both the role of the Saharan Heat Low (SHL) on the West African monsoon and the interactions between the African continent and the Mediterranean basin through the Saharan dust transport. The Saharan desert is the major source of mineral dust in the world and may significantly impact the air quality over the Western Europe by increasing the particular matter content. Two lidar systems were operated by the French component of the FENNEC project: an airborne lidar which was flown aboard the French Falcon 20 research aircraft and a ground-based lidar which was located in the southeastern part of Spain, close to Marbella. A major dust plume originating from multiple emission sources (Mauritania, Morocco, and Algeria) and ultimately transported over southern Spain at the end of June 2011 was observed by the two systems.





S3O-22
OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF UNUSUALLY DENSE MINERAL DUST OUTBREAKS OVER KOREA OBSERVED WITH MULTIWAVELENGTH/AEROSOL/DEPOLARIZATION/RAMAN-QUARTZ LIDAR
Boyan Tatarov1, Detlef Müller1,2, Youngmin Noh1, Dong-Ho Shin1, Sung-Kyun Shin1, Young Joon Kim1
1Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-Gu, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea
2Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Permoser Str. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
We report on two strong events of transport of mineral dust from Central Asia across Korea. The events took place in March and November 2010. According to measurements of PM10 at the ground these events present the strongest cases of dust transport over Korean in the past years. PM10 concentrations exceed 1mg/m3. The event in November is particularly important as fall is not a typical time for strong events of dust transport which usually occurs in springtime. We observed these dust events with a multiwavelength aerosol/depolarization/Raman quartz lidar.
S3O-23
GLOBAL SCALE LIDAR RATIO RETRIEVAL OVER THE OCEAN
Damien Josset1, Jacques Pelon2, Yongxiang Hu3, Raymond Rogers3, Zhaoyan Liu1, Ali Omar3, Mark Vaughan3, Peng-Wang Zhai1, and the ICARE team4
1Science Systems and Applications, Inc, 1 Entreprise Parkway Suite 200, Hampton, VA 23681, USA
2Université Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS, IPSL, LATMOS, Paris, France
3NASA Langley Research Center, MS 475, Hampton VA USA 23681-2199
4ICARE-Université Lille 1, Lille, France
In this paper we discuss global scale lidar ratio retrieval over the ocean as derived by the Synergized Optical Depth of Aerosols (SODA) algorithm (based on CALIPSO/CloudSat ocean surface echo) and comparisons with CALIOP V3 lidar ratio for marine aerosols, dusts and cirrus clouds. As expected, the signatures vary as a function of the feature type. We show that the SODA lidar ratio at 532 nm is in relatively good agreement with what is currently used in CALIOP operational product. The lidar ratio at 1064 nm is however different. The origin of the differences cannot as yet be clearly identified. It may be related to the 1064 nm calibration, the ocean surface product, or to residual errors in the identification of aerosol type. As the lidar ratio is linked to the aerosol absorption and the backscatter phase function, it will help to better understand the aerosol and cloud radiative properties at global scale in the visible and in the near infrared.
S3O-24

OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF BIOMASS BURNING AEROSOL IN THE AMAZON BASIN
Holger Baars1, Dietrich Althausen1, Albert Ansmann1, Ronny Engelmann1, Birgit Heese1, Ulla Wandinger1, Detlef Müller1,2, Rodrigo Souza3, Theotonio Pauliquevis4, Paulo Artaxo5
1Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig, Germany
2now at: Science Systems and Applications, Inc, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, USA
3University of the State of Amazonas, Manaus, Brazil
4Department of Earth and Natural Sciences, Federal University of São Paulo at Diadema, Diadema, Brazil
5Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Continuous lidar measurements were carried out in the Amazon rain forest for almost one year in 2008. These measurements were performed with an automated multi-wavelength-polarization-Raman lidar. Each year during the dry season, a high burning activity occurs in the Amazon Basin that heavily inûuences the atmospheric conditions. The optical and microphysical properties of the resulting biomass burning aerosol (BBA) are presented in this work. A case study shows the effect of smoke advection towards our measurement site. Such advection events were frequently observed for several months during the dry season. The lidar-derived optical and geometrical properties obtained from a statistical analysis of more than 50 observation cases in the dry season are presented next. Typically, lidar ratios between 60 and 80 sr at 532 nm and Ångström exponents between 0.5 and 1.5 were observed. These results reveal that smoke which was aged by more than one day did usually dominate the aerosol population at the lidar site. The particle depolarization ratio of the aged BBA was always below 3%. Typically, smoke aerosol was present from the surface up to 4.5 km showing the importance of shallow, deep, and pyro-convection for the vertical transport of aerosol in the Amazon Basin.
S3O-25
CHANGE OF OPTICAL AND MICROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF BIOMASS BURNING AEROSOL DURING TRANSPORT IN THE FREE TROPOSPHERE
Doina Nicolae1, Detlef Müller2,3, Camelia Talianu1, Anca Nemuc1, Adrian Timofte4,5
1National Institute of R&D for Optoelectronics INOE, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele, Romania
2Science Systems and Applications Inc., NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23666, USA
3Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Permoserstasse 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
4“Al. I. Cuza” University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi, Romania
5National Meteorological Administration, Regional Forecast Center Bacau, 1 Cuza Voda Str., Bacau, Romania
In this study we focus on the modification of optical and microphysical parameters of biomass burning aerosols (BBA) due to oxidation processes during their long-range transport. A multi-instrument approach was employed, using active and passive remote sensors (multiwavelength Raman lidar, AERONET sunphotometers, MODIS images with NOAA's-12 active fire mask) and trajectory modelling (HYSPLIT). Lidar allows us to identify different layers (vertical resolution) and thus helps in specifying the position of the layers that have a given age (according to HYPSPLIT). It also provides sufficient optical information as to calculate microphysical parameters of the particles within the layers. The change of Ångström exponent, AOD, particle effective radius and complex refractive index with the particle age was analyzed based on 6 measurement cases at INOE and relevant literature, both within the BBA layer and the total atmospheric column. Data were collected above our station (lidar and sunphotometer) and along the transport path of the plumes (sunphotometer). We found that the Ångström exponent (extinction related) and the imaginary part of the refractive index decrease during atmospheric evolution (or “ageing” described in terms of transport time which is a proxy of the age of the observed biomass burning plumes), while the ratio of lidar ratios (LR532/LR355) changes rapidly from sub-unitary values for fresh to supra-unitary for aged smoke plumes.

Tuesday, 26 June 2012

Poster Presentations 18:00-20:00

Session 2P
Networking – Forecast Models
Co-Chairs: Toshiyuki Murayama, Doina Nicolae
S2P-01
ARIADNE: the Greek Lidar Network
Alexandros Papayannis1, Dimitrios Balis2, Panayotis Kokkalis1, Rodelise Mamouri1, Georgios Tsaknakis1, Elina Giannakaki2,4, Nikos Siomos2, and Vassilis Amiridis3
1National Technical University of Athens, Laser Remote Sensing Unit, Zografou, Greece
2Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
3National Observatory of Athens, Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing, Palaia Penteli, Greece
4Finnish Meteorological Institute, P.O. Box 503, FI-00101 Helsinki, Finland
The Greek lidar network (ARIADNE) provides systematic measurements of ozone and aerosol profiles and particle characterization over urban, semi-urban and rural sites, over the Greek territory. Two main partners constitute ARIADNE: the Laser Remote Sensing Unit (LRSU) of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) and the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics (LAP) of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Both partners are equipped with elastic-Raman-DIAL lidar systems; LRSU is also equipped with a 532 nm elastic depolarization lidar, part of a mobile air pollution monitoring unit. The retrieved vertical profiles in the troposphere (from near ground up to 10-18 km height) concern the tropospheric ozone mixing ratio and the aerosol optical properties (backscatter coefficient at 355-532-1064 nm, extinction coefficient at 355-532 nm, lidar ratio at 355-532 nm and the Ångström-related exponent at 355nm/532nm, 532nm/1064nm), the aerosol microphysical properties (mean/effective radius, mean refractive index, surface/volume density, single scattering albedo) and the water vapor mixing ratio. As atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in Earth’s radiation budget, the data collected by ARIADNE, in synergy with other platforms (ground-based and space-borne) will be used as input parameters in models, to estimate radiative transfer changes in climate models in vulnerable region of the Eastern Mediterranean.
S2P-02
A NEW LIDAR AND CLOUD RADAR NETWORK IN FINLAND
Anne Emilia Hirsikko1, Ewan J. O´Connor1,2, Mika Komppula3, Matthias Bauer-Pfundstein4, Antti Poikonen1, Eleni Giannakaki3, Mikko Kurri1, Tomi Karppinen1, Heikki Lihavainen1, Ari Laaksonen1, Kari E.J. Lehtinen3 and Yrjö Viisanen1
1Finnish Meteorological Institute, Research and Development, P.O. Box 503, FI-00101, Helsinki, Finland
2Meteorology Department, University of Reading, Reading, UK
3Finnish Meteorological Institute, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211, Kuopio, Finland
4Meteorologische Messtechnik GmbH (METEK), Elmshorn, Germany
In order to monitor the dispersion of ash from forest fires and volcanic eruptions, and to investigate the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer and clouds, the Finnish Meteorological Institute has established a new network of remote sensing instruments in Finland. The network consists of a number of identical Doppler lidars, a Raman lidar, and a Doppler cloud radar accompanied by ceilometers, ancillary meteorological instruments and comprehensive aerosol measurements. The current network consists of three sites: Sodankylä (northern Finland), Kuopio (central Finland) and Helsinki (southern Finland). The Doppler lidars have not previously been deployed in harsh winter conditions, and therefore, our purpose was to examine the observation capability in low atmospheric aerosol concentrations, and the instrument reliability in temperatures below -20°C or during heavy snow. The low atmospheric aerosol concentrations encountered required modification of the averaging period to ensure sufficient data quality. Based on our experience low ambient temperatures or a 10 cm layer of snow on top of the instrument did not disturb the lidar operation, due to effective built-in heating systems. We also compared the performance of three lidars side-by-side and observed reasonable agreement between the horizontal wind velocity components and the backscatter signal.
S2P-03
DEVELOPMENT OF AN ARGENTINEAN LIDAR NEWORK TO MONITOR THE VOLCANIC PLUME AND DUST IN PATAGONIA
Pablo R. Ristori1, Lidia A. Otero1,2, Ezequiel Pawelko1, Juan Pallotta1, Raúl D’Elía1,2, Fernando Chouza1, Francisco Gonzalez1, Juan Carlos Dworniczak1, Osvaldo Vilar1, Andrea Pereyra1,Martín Fernández3, Sebastián Lema3, Nobuo Sugimoto4, Eduardo J. Quel1
1División Lidar, CEILAP, UNIDEF (MINDEF - CONICET), UMI-IFAECI-CNRS 3351, Juan Bautista de La Salle 4397 - B1603ALO Villa Martelli, Buenos Aires, Argentina
2Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Rivadavia 1917 C1033AAJ CABA, Argentina
3Servicio Meteorológico Nacional. 25 de Mayo 658 - C1002ABN - CABA. Argentina
4National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba-City, Ibaraki, 305-8506 Japan
A new multi-wavelength lidar network to monitor the presence of suspended aerosols in Argentina over Patagonian Airports affected by the Puyehue Cordón Caulle volcano is presented. These lidars are being developed by the lidar Division at CEILAP - Buenos Aires for the National Weather Service (NWS) who is in charge of the operation of these systems and the real time information to the airports, airlines, the Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) and the general public of the actual conditions at the observation sites. Plume observations of the volcanic activity of Puyehue reaching Buenos Aires and evidence of volcanic ash lifted from the ground and transported to the first observational site at Bariloche are presented as well as the description of the new instrumentation being built at the lidar Division.
S2P-04
A MET OFFICE FORWARD OPERATOR FOR ATTENUATED BACKSCATTER
Owen Cox and Cristina Charlton-Pérez
UK Meteorological Office @ Reading, Meteorology Building, University of Reading, Reading, RG6 6BB
The Met Office possesses a relatively dense network of ceilometers capable of reporting attenuated elastic backscatter and providing forecasters with more information on cloud and aerosol layers. This new source of observations could potentially be assimilated into the Met Office Unified Model (UM) to improve forecast accuracy. However, in order to implement these backscatter observations within the assimilation cycle, a forward operator is required to calculate synthetic observations which allow comparison of the model state with the observations. This work describes the methodology behind a recently developed forward operator, as well as outlining its potential uses and giving some overview of the Met Office’s ceilometer network. Size distributions are calculated from UM diagnostic fields at each level of the model, for a given location (coinciding with a ceilometer). Using refractive indices from literature, the extinction and backscatter can then be calculated from these distributions. These properties can then be used to calculate the attenuated backscatter which is observed by the single channel ceilometer instruments. At present the forward operator is designed to generate synthetic observations from aerosol and non-precipitating liquid clouds.
S2P-05
EVALUATING GLOBAL AEROSOL MASS TRANSPORT MODELING SKILL USING MPLNET LEVEL 2.0 PROFILES OF EXTINCTION COEFFICIENT
Ellsworth J. Welton1, James R. Campbell2, Jianglong Zhang3, Randall S. Johnson3, Santo V. Salinas4, Boon Ning Chew4, Jeffrey S. Reid2, Joseph M. Prospero5
1NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 612, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
2 Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, California 93940, USA
3Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA
4Centre for Remote Imaging, Sensing and Processing, National University of Singapore, Singapore
5 Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmos. Sci., University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA
This poster describes a paradigm for evaluating analysis and forecast skill of a global aerosol mass transport model and its vertical profile of 550 nm aerosol extinction coefficient using Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) Level 2.0 datasets. The U.S. Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) is a 1° x 1° global aerosol mass transport model used for computing 6-day forecasts of smoke, dust, sulfate, sea salt and SO2 mass concentration every 6 hr on twenty-four levels up to 100 hPa. Quality-assured MPLNET retrievals of 532 nm aerosol extinction coefficient are considered at Singapore and Barbados, solved at 75 m vertical resolution, and a Hanning window is used in order to score a weighted absolute and relative extinction coefficient error relative to distance of the lidar observation from a given model level. Spatial half-widths are set relative to the middle of a grid bin based on the width between successive model levels. Prospects for a cross-network validation scheme are discussed, as are the constraints of Level 1.5/2.0 processing systems relative to the expedience of data availability necessary for operational modeling systems.

Session 3P
Aerosol Characterization – Clouds – Radiative Properties
Co-Chairs: Joe Shaw, Anatolii Chaikovsky
S3P-01
THE EFFECT OF THE AEROSOL VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION ON THE SOLAR
RADIATION PROFILES
Stelios Kazadzis1, Natalia Kouremeti2, Elina Giannakaki2,3, Vassilis Amiridis4, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri5,6, Dimitrios Balis2, Alexandros Papayannis5
1Institute of Environmental Research and Sustainable Development, National Observatory of Athens,
Greece
2Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124, Greece
3Finnish Meteorological Institute, Kuopio Unit, 70211 Kuopio, Finland
4Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, Greece
5Laser Remote Sensing Laboratory, Physics Department, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
6Department of Civil Engineering and Geomatics, Cyprus Technical University, 3041 Lemesos, Cyprus
We have investigated the effect of different aerosol profiles on the vertical distribution of solar radiation’s various components, at different wavelengths. Two cases of smoke and urban pollution for Athens and Thessaloniki respectively that have been captured by Lidar measurements have been investigated. Global, direct, diffuse irradiance and actinic flux profiles have been retrieved using a radiative transfer model (RTM) and the results have been compared with RTM outputs using the standard atmosphere aerosol profile. All aerosol profiles have been scaled according to the aerosol optical depths (AOD) retrieved by sun-photometric measurements in order to assess the aerosol profile differences effects only. Large differences have been observed for direct and diffuse irradiances while smaller, but as high as 10%, for the global irradiance and actinic flux, depending on wavelength and height. The effect of the observed layers contributed differently for different wavelengths, layer heights and layer absorbing properties.
S3P-02
INVESTIGATION THE OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND RADIATIVE EFFECTS OF AEROSOLS FROM SOUTHEAST CHINA AND INDOCHINA BY A MICRO-PULSE LIDAR IN TAIWAN
Wei-Nai Chen1, Kai-Hsuan Hsu1, Li-Ting Chen1, Tian-Ren Yang1, M. Roja Raman1, N.H. Lin2, S.H. Wang2
1Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Taipei115, Taiwan
2Institute of Atmospheric Science, National Central University, Chungli 320, Taiwan
Optical properties and and radiative effects of aerosols originated from Southeast China and Indochina were investigated. Combing a ground-based micro-pulse lidar (asl. 135 m) and in-situ measurements of aerosol at a atmospheric background site (asl. 2862 m), aerosol radiative effects were calculated using vertical aerosol distributions from lidar and in-situ and columnar aerosol optical characteristics such as single-scattering albedo. Trace gases, aerosol optical depths from MODIS, and HYSPLIT back-trajectories combined to investigate the source of aerosols.
S3P-03
AEROSOL OPTICAL AND RADIATIVE PROPERTIES DURING DUST AND HAZE
EVENTS OVER HEFEI, CHINA
Zhenzhu Wang, Dong Liu, Decheng Wu, Chenbo Xie, Jun Zhou, Yingjian Wang
Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Composition and Optical Radiation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
The dust event in spring 2010 and the haze case in autumn 2009 over Hefei, China were explored by lidar and skyradiometer. AOD derived from these two instruments was compared with each other and a good agreement was shown with a correlation coefficient near 95%. Aerosol optical properties including the AOD, SSA, AAE and size distribution during these two events were presented and discussed in this paper. Furthermore, the radiative forcing due to aerosols and the heating rate in the ATM were also calculated using SBDART model. The results were shown that the heavy dust aerosol loading was controlled mainly by coarse mode with small absorption, instead of that the fine mode took part in the haze process with the absorptive aerosol. And the vertical heating rate is tightly related to aerosol profile.
S3P-04
FIRST-TIME ESTIMATION OF RADIATIVE FORCING BY THE DUST AND POLLUTION CONTENT IN MIXED EAST ASIAN POLLUTION PLUMES ON THE BASIS OF DEPOLARIZATION RATIOS MEASURED WITH LIDAR
Young M. Noh1, Hanlim Lee2, Detlef Muller1, 4, Kwon-ho Lee3, Gwanchul Kim1, Dong-ho Shin1, Boyan Tatarov1, Sung-kyun Shin1, Young J. Kim1
1School of Environmental Science & Engineering Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712, Korea
2Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Yonsei University, Korea
3 Department of Satellite Geoinformatics Engineering, Kyungil University, Korea
4 Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (IfT), Germany
For the first time, the radiative forcing of the dust andnon-dust part of the Asian dust plumes was calculated, respectively. We used Raman lidar derived vertical distributions in optical properties of the dust and the pollution particles as inputs for radiative transfer simulations. The contribution of non-dust optical depth to total optical depth was smaller than the contribution of optical depth from dust to total optical depth. However, the non-dust particles contributed larger tothe radiative forcing at the surface than the dustradiative forcing. This result demonstrates that enhanced Asian dust radiative forcing can be largely attributed to the presence of non-dust particles mixed into Asian dust layers rather than the radiative forcingby pure dust particles. We also find that pollution particles play a significant role in stabilizing the dust layer by increasing the radiative heating rates within dust layers.
S3P-05
THE CALIPSO LIDAR DUST MEASUREMENT: A TRANS-PACIFIC
TRANSPORT EVENT OF ASIAN DUST IN APRIL 2010
Zhaoyan Liu1,2, Duncan Fairlie2, Raymond Rogers2, Sharon Rodier1,2, Mark Vaughan2, Ali Omar2, Charles Trepte2, David Winker2, and Yongxiang Hu2
1SSAI, Hampton, VA, USA
2NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, USA
Multiple dust storms occurred in East Asia during April 2010 and dust was transported to North America. Seven orbits of the CALIPSO lidar measurements are selected over the North Pacific and analyzed to examine possible changes in the intrinsic optical properties of Asian dust during the course of transport. The derived dust depolarization ratio ranges between 0.2-0.3 over Pacific, similar to that (0.26±0.03) observed by an airborne HSRL for Asian dust transported over the central East US, but smaller than that observed in the source region. The mean value of the dust lidar ratio derived for each orbit varies between 30 sr and 50 sr, while the airborne HSRL measured a value of 42±12 sr in central East US.
S3P-06
DUST WATER INTERACTION OBSERVED BY USING RAMAN AND
POLARIZATION LIDAR
Jan Bai Nee1 and Chih Wei Chiang1,2
1 Department of Physics, National Central University, Chung-Li 320, Taiwan
2Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kun Shan University, Tainan 710, Taiwan
Dust aerosols and their interactions with clouds are investigated by using Mie/Raman/Polarization lidar systems at wavelengths 532/355/386/407 nm at Chung-Li (24.6oN, 121.1oE).  The observations involve measuring signals of backscattering, polarization, and Raman scatterings of aerosols, water vapor and nitrogen. By comparing the polarization measurements at 532 nm with Raman measurements at 355/386/407 nm, we study the dust-cloud interactions from measurements of depolarization and lidar ratios. The simultaneous 407 nm Raman and the polarization ratios provide information of dust-water interactions. In a particular case, a detrainment process showing water vapor leaving a dust cloud is observed from polarization measurements.
S3P-07
DUST AND ICE OCCURRENCE RATIOS OVER DUST SOURCES OBSERVED
BY SPACE/GROUND BASED ACTIVE REMOTE SENSOR
Yoshitaka Jin1, Kenji Kai1, Hajime Okamoto2, Yuichiro Hagihara2, Hongfei Zhou3
1Graduate school of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya 461-8601, Japan
2Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakouen, Kasuga, 816-8580, Japan
3Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, CAS, Urumqi, 830011, China
Dust Occurrence Ratio (DOR) and Ice Occurrence Ratio (IOR) over the Saharan andTaklimakan Deserts are investigated in this study. Aerosols such as dust act as ice nuclei and affect on the Earth’s radiationbudget as indirect effect. The spatial distributions of such aerosols and formed clouds are not well known. In order to overcome the problems, we used Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathûnder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), CloudSat, and ECMWF reanalysis data for extracting the aerosol and cloud proûles. The ground-based lidar observation wasalso carriedoutin north Taklimakan Desert to validate the satellite analysis. The purpose of this study is to clarify the change of the IOR according to the DOR. The result shows that the DOR over the Asian Deserts was higher and broader than that over the Saharan Desert. It means there was the Asian dust more frequently compared to the Saharan dust at the low temperatures. The IOR of theTaklimakan region were higher than those of the Saharan region for all temperatures and the DOR were also higher. We also examined the relationship between the DOR and IOR using those for the Saharan andTaklimakan Deserts. The result shows that the increasing rate of the IOR with respect to the DOR was increased at lower temperature. The result of the ground-based lidar analysis was consistent with the result of the satellite analysis.
S3P-08
AEROSOL PROPERTIES FOR A DUST EVENT OBSERVED OVER CYPRUS
Argyro Nisantzi1, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri1, Diofantos G. Hadjimitsis1
1Department of Civil Engineering and Geomatics, Remote Sensing Laboratory, Cyprus University of Technology,
3041 Lemesos, Cyprus
Saharan dust aerosols influence Cyprus due to thecyclone activity all around the Mediterranean. Routinemeasurements have been performed by thebackscatter/depolarization lidar system of the CyprusUniversity of Technology (CUT) for the last two years.A case study of Saharan dust aerosols transferred over the Eastern Mediterranean, on May 2010 has been selectedby the authors for the purpose of this paper. Ground-based and satellite passive and active remote sensingobservations were used complimentary for therepresentative evaluation of the dust event. Specifically, CALIOP level-2 data with coincidence ground-based measurements performed by the lidar station at Lemesos, Cyprus were used for the case of 14th of May 2010. The daily backscatter coefficient at 532 nm and 1064 nm has been compared with the satellite derivedCALIPSO data in conjunction with AERONET retrievals, for the first time in Cyprus. It has been found that the aerosol optical properties profiles of the ground-based CUT’s lidar and the CALIOP were in a goodagreement, especially within the aerosol dust layers.
S3P-09
DUST DEPOLARIZATION RATIOS OF ASIAN DUST OBSERVED WITH
MULTIWAVELENGTH RAMAN LIDAR IN KOREA
Sungkyun Shin1, Young Min Noh1, Boyan Tatarov1, Dongho Shin1, and Detlef Müller1,2,3
1Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of
Science and Technology Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea
2 Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (IfT), Germany
3now at Science Systems and Applications, Inc., NASA Langley Research Center, USA

We present linear particle depolarization ratios (LPDRs) retrieved from observations with a multi-wavelength Raman lidar at the Gwangju Institute of Science andTechnology (GIST), Korea (35.11° N, 126.54° E). The measurements were carried out in spring (March to May) 2010 and 2011. During that time Asian dust was reported by the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). The transport path of Asian dust from central Asia to the Korean peninsula was identified by a backward trajectory model. We use eighteen cases of Asian dust for our analysis. We find maximum LPDRs of 0.26 - 0.3 (at 532 nm). The frequency distribution of the LPDRs is centered at depolarization ratios of 0.11-0.15. We find these values in 44% of our measurements. We compare our results to LPDRs of pure mineral dust observed with lidar during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment that was carried out in Morocco in 2006.
S3P-10
LIDAR DEPOLARIZATION AND SUN PHOTOMETER POLARIZATION
MEASUREMENTS FOR PARTICLE CHARACTERIZATION OVER GUANGZHOU, CHINA
Birgit Heese1, Dietrich Althausen1, Michael Bauditz1, Ruoyu Bao2 and Ruru Deng2, Zhengqiang Li3
1IfT, Institute for Tropospheric Research, Permoser Str. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
2School of Geography and Planning, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
3 IRSA, Institute for Remote Sensing Applications, Beijing, China
We present a dataset of simultaneous lidar depolarization profiles and sun photometer polarization measurements by a dual-polar instrument. The data were taken in southern China during the Megacities campaign since October 2011. The mean values for the background urban aerosol measured by the sun photometer are an aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.45 and an Ångström exponent of 1.33. The lidar depolarization ratio has typical values of urban pollution below 5% and the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) measured by the dual-polar sun photometer shows no specific wavelength dependence for urban background particles. In one case, on Dec 3, 2011, the Ångström exponent was exceptionally low with 0.72 concurrently with increasing lidar depolarization values up to 20 % inside an elevated layer. The spectral dependence of the DOLP was clearly increasing on this day. These properties indicate the presence of larger particles. A trajectory analysis shows a northerly flow towards Guangzhou over the deserts so that dust particles may have mixed into the urban background aerosol that is normally present over the area. This dataset is intended to be completed to a full annual cycle and may serve as a database for further studies of integrated lidar and sun photometer algorithms including polarization measurements.
S3P-11
STUDY OF MIXT AEROSOLS USING DEPOLARIZATION LIDAR AND AMS DATA
Jeni Vasilescu, Doina Nicolae, Luminita Marmureanu, Livio Belegante
National Institute of R&D for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele, Romania
Aerosols optical properties and mass concentration loadings in the upper layers and near ground are seasonally variable, containing different mixture of components, related to their origin and transport over the polluted areas. The aim of this study is to characterize the aerosols chemical composition and possible mixture of components observed on Magurele, Romania. The results are derived from depolarization multiwavelength lidar and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) data. We used the lidar 532 nm linear particle depolarization ratio and Tesche et al. (2009) method to discriminate between low- and high-depolarizing aerosols contribution to the 532 nm backscatter coefficient. Cases with external mixture of two types of aerosols (low and high depolarizing) and cases with low depolarizing predominant aerosols were analyzed in order to reveal the weaknesses and applicability of the method. Volcanic and mineral dust, biomass-burning and continental aerosols externally mixed within elevated layers were evidenced, and their contribution to the total mass was quantitatively assessed. Comparison between the retrieval of the submicronic aerosols mass concentration within the planetary boundary layer from AMS and from lidar was performed for several cases. We observed and could account for seasonal differences both for the linear particle depolarization ratio and for the mass concentration of various components.
S3P-12
VARIABILITY OF MIXING AEROSOLS OVER A S-E MEDITERRANEAN SITE
Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri1, Argyro Nisantzi1, Panayotis Kokkalis2 and Diofantos G. Hadjimitsis1
1Department of Civil Engineering and Geomatics, Remote Sensing Lab, Cyprus University of Technology,
2Department of Applied Mathematics and Physics, National Technical University of Athens,
Cyrpus is located in the South Eastern Mediterranean and thus is strongly affected by both, Saharan and Saudi Arabian deserts. At the end of September 2011, a strong dust storm from Saudi Arabian desert occurred over Eastern Mediterranean. The dust plume was recorded by MODIS satellite sensors on the 28th, 29th and 30th of September 2011. Additionally, during that period fire sources in eastern and central Turkey generated smoke plumes transported Southwestern reaching Mediterranean region. In this study the variability or the mixing aerosols during an intense dust event has been examined in terms of backscatter coefficient and particle depolarization vertical profiles in visible spectral range. Lidar measurements performed at Cyprus EARLINET station, located in Lemesos in the premises of the Cyprus University of Technology, are used in combination with the AERONET sun-photometer measurements. Indeed, such data are used for the vertical separation of the different aerosol types.
S3P-13
OPTICAL PROPERTIES OFANTHROPOGENICAEROSOLS OVER THESSALONIKI, GREECE, DURING THE SCOUT-O3 CAMPAIGN
Elina Giannakaki1,2, Dimitrios Balis2, Vassilis Amiridis3
1Finnish Meteorological Institute, Kuopio Unit, Kuopio 7021, Finland
2Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
3Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, 15784 Palaia Penteli, Greece
We present the optical properties of anthropogenic aerosols over Thessaloniki, Greece during 24th and 25th of June 2006. Aerosol optical depth is significant high of the order of 0.8-0.9 at 550 nm, while Ångström exponent ranges from 1.2 to 2.0. Backscatter coefficient indicates large aerosol load inside boundary layer. There was almost no advection of air-masses from outside Europe within the planetary boundary layer, while FLEXPART model simulations indicate that Thessaloniki was slightly influenced in the free troposphere by the advection of pollution from North America.
S3P-14
TROPOSPHERIC MEASUREMENTS OF AEROSOL OPTICAL PROPERTIES
AT CONCEPCIÓN, CHILE (36°S, 73°W)
Antonieta Silva1,2, E. Montilla-Rosero1,2, C. Jimenez, C. Saavedra1,2, R. Hernandez1,2
1Center for Optics and Photonics, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 4016, Concepción, Chile
2Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción, Chile
A tropospheric backscatter lidar system, the first of this kind developed locally in the country has been set up in the coastal city of Concepción (Chile) to regularly provide vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties at 532 nm and up to 6–7 km height above sea level (asl.). The main aim of the new lidar station is contribute to the atmospheric aerosol studies in Chile. The studies about air quality have been carried out especially in Santiago and Chillán, and these were mainly focused on measurements of particulate matter on ground level. In this work, the measurements carried out during the second half of summer 2012 (southern hemisphere) and the retrieved vertical profiles of aerosol backscatter coefficient are presented. Three-dimensional air mass back trajectory analysis was also conducted to determine the source regions of aerosols observed during this study.
S3P-15
LINEAR ESTIMATION OF TIME SERIES OF BULK PARTICLE PARAMETERS FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Igor Veselovskii1, Alexei Kolgotin1, Michael Korenskiy1, David Whiteman2, Oleg Dubovik3, Nikolai Volkov1
1Optosystems, Physics Instrumentation Center, Troitsk, Moscow Region, 142190, Russia
2Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA
3Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique, CNRS Universite de Lille 1, France
An algorithm for linear estimation (LE) of aerosol bulk properties such as particle radius, volume and complex refractive index from multiwavelength lidar measurements is presented. In the frame of LE approach the bulk particle parameters are estimated from a linear combination of aerosol characteristics measured by multi-wavelength lidar. Therefore, the aerosol characteristics can be directly estimated from lidar measurements without the need to derive the size distribution, which entails more sophisticated procedures. The straightforward utilization of linear estimates stabilizes the retrievals making them more resistant to noise in the optical data. At the same time, the high speed of the retrieval using linear estimates makes the method preferable for generating aerosol information from extended lidar observations.  The developed approach was applied to the results obtained in NASA/GSFC during DISCOVER-AQ 2011 campaign.
S3P-16
ON THE INFLUENCE OF A PRIORI ABSORPTION INFORMATION IN THE AEROSOL MICROPHYSICAL RETRIEVALS FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH LIDAR DATA
Patricia Sawamura1, Detlef Müller2, Raymond M. Hoff1
1University of Maryland Baltimore County, Physics Dept., 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
2 NASA Langley Research Center / Science Systems and Applications Inc., 1 Enterprise Parkway, Hampton, VA 2366, USA
We present some preliminary results of a sensitivity study about the influence of including a priori absorption information in the retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties from inversion of optical measurements from multiwavelength lidar. The simulations utilized AERONET inversion products from three biomass burning cases to calculate synthetic lidar data and the absorption coefficients.
S3P-17
AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION OVER SOUTHEASTERN ITALY BY
MULTI-WAVELENGHT LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Cavalieri Olga, Perrone Maria Rita, De Tomasi Ferdinando
Dipartimento di Fisica, Università del Salento, via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce, Italy
Three wavelengths (355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm) lidar measurements have been performed at the Physics Department of Salento University (40.20° N, 18.06 °E) to characterize aerosol optical properties and their dependence on altitude. Results on four case studies representative of different aerosol types at the monitoring site are presented in this work.
S3P-18
PROPERTIES OF ARCTIC AEROSOL, A CASE STUDY DERIVED AT SPITSBERGEN
Christoph Ritter, Maria Stock, Anne Hoffmann, Roland Neuber
Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Research Department Potsdam, 14473 Potsdam, Germany
During 2008, a clear event of Arctic Haze was observed over Spitsbergen with a “3+2” Raman Lidar. In this work we show some results demonstrating that with the given resolution of the lidar the aerosol event seemed to be quite homogeneous. This result was derived analyzing the data without any smoothing and applying some statistics to analyse the thickest part and the border area of the aerosol layer separately.
S3P-19
Observation of high load of stratosphericaerosols
over Hampton-USA-2011
Boyouk, Neda, Kevin Leavor, M. Patrick Mccormick
Department of Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Hampton University, 23 Tyler St., Hampton, VA 23668, USA
Lidar observations from the Hampton University observatory (37.02°N, 76.33°W) show an unexpected stratospheric aerosol layer between 17 to 18 km altitude on 14, 18 and 20 July 2011, and 01 and 02 August. This layer is related to the June 2011 Nabro volcanic eruption. Thirty-five-day backtrajectories from 20 July show the transport of stratospheric layers from Africa to Hampton at 17.5 km. The CALIPSO daytime overpass on 21 July, 338 km from Hampton confirms a stratospheric layer at approximately the same height. Retrieved vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient are used to confirm the existence of aerosol layers at stratospheric heights and to determine their optical properties. The backscatter and extinction coefficients of these stratospheric aerosols are obtained using the Klett method and an estimated lidar ratio. A backscatter ratio at 1064 nm exceeding a threshold value of 3.5 in the stratosphere is considered a stratospheric aerosol layer. The aerosol optical thickness of this layer is compared to the integrated aerosol optical thickness of the lowest 3 km of the troposphere.
S3P-20
PROPERTIES OF THREE AIR MASSES OBSERVED IN AUGUST 2011 IN SOPOT, POLAND
Iwona S. Stachlewska1, Anna Rozwadowska2, Krzysztof M. Markowicz1and Przemyslaw Makuch2
1Institute of Geophysics,Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw (IGFUW), Pasteura 7, 02-093 Warsaw, Poland
2Institute of Oceanology,Polish Academy of Sciences (IOPAS), PowstaDców Warszawy 55, 81-712 Sopot, Poland
Aerosol optical properties for three air-masses advected from the North, the West and the South, during a field campaign conducted in August 2011 in Sopot, at the coast of the Baltic Sea of Poland are characterized. A preliminary estimation of aerosol radiative forcing at midday results in roughly 10 Wm-2 for the Arctic air (North) and 50 Wm-2 for the vegetation fires (South).
S3P-21
FRESH SMOKE AEROSOL LAYERS OBSERVATIONS BY A MULTI-WAVELENGTH RAMAN LIDAR OVER ATHENS, DURING HELLENIC WILD FIRES
Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri1,2, Alexandros Papayannis1, Detlef Müller3, George Tsaknakis1, Panayiotis Kokkalis1 and Vassilis Amiridis4
1National Technical University of Athens, Laser Remote Sensing Laboratory, Athens, Greece
2now at: Cyprus University of Technology, Department of Civil Engineering and Geomatics, Laboratory of Remote Sensing, Limassol, Cyprus
3Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory (ARSL), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Republic of Korea & Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig, Germany & now at: Science Systems and Applications, Inc, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, USA
4National Observatory of Athens, Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing, Athens, Greece
A 6-wavelength Raman lidar was used to obtain the optical properties (backscatter, extinction coefficient, lidar ratio-LR, Ångström exponent-AE) of biomass burning aerosol in the troposphere over Athens (37.9oN, 23.6oE, 200 m above sea level-asl.), Greece, during wildfires in the summer periods 2007-2009. Twelve cases of sampled air masses from wildfires were selected. The source regions (biomass burning areas) were located within a radius of about 100 km from our lidar station. The different distance, as well the different duration of the fires, results in different aging of the pyrogenic aerosols and thus, in different optical and microphysical properties. The Raman technique was applied for the independent retrieval of the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients and thus, to obtain the LR aerosol values inside the smoke layers. The purpose of this paper is to compare the pyrogenic aerosol optical properties coming from various distances with different arrival times from their source regions. We found LR values ranging from 40-100 sr (at 355 and 532 nm), while the AE values presented a high variability with values of the order of -0.5 to 2. Additionally, an inversions algorithm was used to derive the mean aerosol microphysical properties inside the selected heights of the visible smoke plumes.
S3P-22
AEROSOL VERTICAL MASS CONCENTRATION ASSESSMENT AND INTER-COMPARISON WITH MODEL DERIVED PROFILES
Nikos Papagiannopoulos1,2, Elina Giannakaki2,3, Dimitrios Balis2
1Istituto di Metodologie per l’Analisi Ambientale, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Contrada S. Loja, 85050 Tito Scalo (Potenza), Italy
2Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
3 Finnish Meteorological Institute, Kuopio Unit, 70211 Kuopio, Finland
In this study we calculate estimates of Mass Extinction Efficiency (MEE), which represents the extinction of aerosol per unit mass. The extraction of the aerosol mass concentration profile relies on the combination of the columnar calculation of MEE and the lidar spatially resolved extinction coefficient. In order to retrieve MEE, a Raman/elastic lidar must be collocated and concurrently utilized with sun photometers. We implemented two similar methodologies to the MEE retrieval. A thorough analysis of the MEE has been evaluated through a one-year period in order to identify its physical significance. Then the estimated conversion factor for various cases of aerosol pollution over the measuring site showed values ranging from 2-9 m2/g (assuming particle density 1.0 g/cm3) which are quite consistent with bibliographic values. Furthermore individual profiles of desert dust intrusion are projected along with profiles from the Dust REgional Atmospheric Modeling (DREAM) model.
S3P-23
VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF AEROSOLS OVER THE GREATER MEDITERRANEAN
BASIN USING CALIOP OBSERVATIONS
Vasilis Pappas, Nikos Hatzianastassiou
Laboratory of Meteorology, Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Greece
Vertically resolved data from Level 3 Version 3 CALIOP database are used to assess the vertical distribution of aerosols over the greater Mediterranean basin (9.5ÚW to 38.5ÚE and from 29.5ÚN to 46.5ÚN). Extinction coefficient measurements at 532 nm from 4 years (December 2006 to November 2010) are analysed and provided at the high resolution of 60 meters. The latitudinal variation reveals a south-to-north gradient of the highest altitude of aerosols that is 6 km in summer. The pattern is mixed in the longitudinal variation presenting high boundary and surface layer values in the western, central and eastern parts of the basin varying with season. The seasonal pattern of aerosol optical depth (AOD) values is in general agreement with other studies, indicating higher values in the dry than wet season of the year. However, there are also some differences like the smaller spatial and seasonal variations of AOD and relatively high autumn AOD.
S3P-24
CHARACTERIZATION OF TRAFFIC AEROSOLS USING LIDAR, SCANNING
ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, AND A PERSONAL CASCADE IMPACTOR
Maria Cecilia D. Galvez1, Ernest P. Macalalad2, Teresita A. Peralta3, and Edgar A. Vallar1
1Physics Dept, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Ave., Malate, 1004 Manila, Philippines
2Insitute for Space Science, National Central University, Chung-Li, Taiwan
3Air Quality Management Section, Environmental Quality Division, Environmental Management Bureau, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines
Characterization of traffic aerosols using a vertical scanning Lidar and SEM-EDX analysis was presented in this paper.  The scanning Lidar provided a two-dimensional profile of the traffic aerosol showing the spatial distribution of the aerosol horizontally and vertically as indicated by the strong backscattering signal. A depolarization ratio between 5-25% of the aerosol was obtained from lidar measurements. SEM image showed that the particles collected from the sampling site were irregularly shaped particles. Elemental analysis also indicated the presence of sea salt that could also contribute to the high depolarization ratio. Elemental analysis showed the presence of C and O, and all particles with traces of Ca, Si, Cu, V, Zn, Sb, Fe, Mg, K, Ba, Co, Cl, Sn, Ni, and Br. Most of these elements are typically associated with anthropogenic emissions such as traffic and combustion of fossil fuels. The study showed that a combined Lidar and air sampling with SEM-EDX analysis can give a better understanding of the characteristics of aerosols such as its spatial distribution, shape, morphology, and chemical compositon, and possibly the source.
S3P-25
CONTINUOUS AND AUTOMATIC MEASUREMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC STRUCTURES AND AEROSOLS OPTICAL PROPERTIES WITH R-MAN510 NITROGEN RAMAN LIDAR
Anthony Bizard, Philippe Royer, Laurent Sauvage, Matthieu Boquet, Ludovic Thobois, Melody Renaudier, B. Bennai 
Leosphere, 16 Rue Jean Rostand, 91400 Orsay, France
The eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano that occurred on April-May 2010 has highlighted the interest of atmospheric lidars for the detection and the assessment of mass concentrations in volcanic ashes. This later requires the determination of the aerosols extinction coefficient profile. A new compact and light nitrogen Raman lidar system (R-Man510) has recently been developed by Leosphere for addressing these needs. In fact, nitrogen Raman lidars offers the opportunity to retrieve particle extinction and backscatter coefficients independently contrary to Rayleigh-Mie lidars that require an assumption on aerosol type. The use of a cross-polarized channel gives additional information on aerosol depolarization ratio which enables the identification of aerosol shape and to discriminate aerosol type. We will present here the main technical characteristic of this new commercial and networkable lidar system and the first results obtained in terms of detection of atmospheric structures (PBL height, cloud/aerosol layers) and retrieval of aerosol optical properties (extinction, backscatter coefficients, lidar ratio, volume and particle linear depolarization ratio).
S3P-26
RETRIEVAL OF AEROSOL AND CLOUD OPTICAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE
TROPOSPHERE BASED ON VERTICAL AND PLAN-POSITION INDICATOR LIDAR
SIGNALS IN COMBINATION WITH GROUND-BASED MEASUREMENTS
Tatsuo Shiina1, Yusaku Mabuchi2, Hayato Saito2, Gerry Bagtasa2, Masanori Yabuki3, Naohiro Manago2, Nobuo Takeuchi2, Hiroaki Kuze1,2
1Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-852, Japan
2Center for Environmental Remote Sensing, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522, Japan
3Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan
Atmospheric Data Collection Lidar (ADCL) of the Center for Environmental Remote Sensing (CEReS), Chiba University, is a multi-wavelength lidar system designed for measuring tropospheric aerosols and clouds with ancillary data from ground-based aerosol measurement instruments. In this paper, we report on the concept of aerosol and cloud retrieval based on vertical, slant-path, and plan-position indicator (PPI) lidar measurements in combination with aerosol measurements conducted with a three-wavelength integrating nephelometer, an aethalometer, and a particle counter.
S3P-27
SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATION OF AEROSOLS USING THE DURBAN AND REUNION LIDAR SYSTEMS
Nkanyiso Bongumusa Mbatha1,2, V. Sivakumar1, Hassan Bencherif3, Philippe Keckhut4 
1School of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000, South Africa
2SANSA Space Science, P.O. Box 32, Hermanus 7200, South Africa
3Laboratoire de l’Atmosphère et des Cyclones, UMR 8105 CNRS, Université de La Réunion, 97715 Saint- Denis, Cedex 9, La Réunion, France
4LATMOS-IPSL, UVSQ, Univ. UPMC Paris 6, Paris, France
The observation of aerosols over Durban (29.9ÚS, 31.0ÚE, South Africa) and Reunion Island (20.8ÚS, 55.5ÚE) using Rayleigh-Mie lidar data collected during a coincident night of 21 May 2003 is presented in this paper. The temporal evolution of the Durban lidar backscatter signal for the corresponding night is used to study aerosols and clouds condition. The aerosol loading in the lower stratosphere is discussed in terms of aerosol extinction coefficient during this coincident night. A clear enhancement due to the presence of aerosols over Durban at the height level above 6 km is observed. The coincident profile of the aerosol extinction coefficient measured by the Durban and the Reunion lidar shows consistency during this day, with maximum observed at ~17 km for both lidars. However, the Reunion lidar shows higher aerosol extinction coefficient values.
S3P-28
THE USE OF RAMAN LIDAR FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLE HYGROSCOPICITY: ANALYSIS OF SELECTED CASE STUDIES FROM THE CONVECTIVE AND OROGRAPHICALLY-INDUCED PRECIPITATION STUDY
Dario Stelitano1, Paolo Di Girolamo1, Donato Summa1, Tatiana Di Iorio2
1 DIFA, Univ. Degli Studi della Basilicata, Viale dell'Ateneo Lucano n. 10, 85100 Potenza, Italy
2 Dipartimento di Fisica, Univ. degli Studi di Roma ‘La Sapienza’ Roma, Italy
Aerosol particles tend to grow at large relative humidity values as a result of their hygroscopicity. Raman lidars with aerosol, water vapour and temperature measurement capability are potentially attractive tools for studying aerosol hygroscopicity as in fact they can provide continuous altitude-resolved measurements of particle optical, size and microphysical properties, as well as relative humidity, without perturbing the aerosols or their environment. Specifically, the University of Basilicata Raman lidar system (BASIL) considered in the present study has the capability to perform all-lidar measurements of relative humidity based on the combined application of the rotational and the vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV.
BASIL was operational in Achern (Black Forest, Lat: 48.64 ° N, Long: 8.06 ° E, Elev.: 140 m) between 25 May and 30 August 2007 in the framework of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS). The present analysis is focused on selected case studies characterized by the presence of different aerosol types with different hygroscopic behaviour. The observed behaviour, dependent upon aerosol composition, ranges from hygrophobic to hygroscopic, with monotonic (smoothly varying) or deliquescent (step change) growth.
S3P-29
EVALUATION OF HYGROSCOPIC GROWTH OF URBAN AEROSOLS USING RAMAN LIDAR TECHNIQUE DURING NASA DISCOVER-AQ CAMPAIGN
Patricia Ferrini Rodrigues1, E. Landulfo1, B. B. Demoz2, D. D. Venable2, M. Walker2, R. Connell2, D. N. Whiteman3
1Center for Lasers and Applications, Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, Sao Paulo, Brazil
2Department of Physics and Astronomy, Howard University, Washington, D.C. 20059, USA
3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771, USA
A Raman Lidar system is used to derive information about hygroscopic growth during DISCOVER-AQ campaign. Two cloud cap days were selected and the hygroscopic growing factor was determined using two different levels of reference relative humidity. The calculated ûtting curve agrees with previous results found in literature.
S3P-30
MEASUREMENTS OF CIRRUS CLOUD COLOR RATIO WITH A MULTI-WAVELENGTH LIDAR
Zongming Tao1,2, Dong Liu2, Bo Shi1, Miao Nie1, Xiaomin Ma1, Heli Wei2, Zhiqing Zhong2, Jun Zhou2
1 New Star Institute of Applied Technology, Hefei, 230031 Anhui, China
2 Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1125, Hefei, 230031 Anhui, China
A multi-wavelength lidar system is set up at AnhuiInstitute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, which emits 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths laser and receives backscatter signals at six channels (355 nm, 386 nm, 532 nm parallel, 532 nm perpendicular, 607 nm and 1064 nm) to detect cirrus cloud and microphysical particale properties of aerosols. In total 2.189 cirrus cloud profiles with attenuated backscatter ratio larger than 10 from January 2011 to October 2011 are used in this paper. After calibrating backscatter signals at proper reference point under cirrus cloud, three cirrus cloud color ratios are computed and the statistics of cirrus cloud color ratio distributions are given.
S3P-31
METHODOLOGY FOR A ROBUST RETRIEVAL OF THE EXTINCTION-TO-BACKSCATTER RATIO OF CIRRUS CLOUDS BASED ON LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
AT SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL
Eliane Gonçalves Larroza1, Walter Morinobu Nakaema1, Christophe Hoareau2, Eduardo Landulfo1, Philippe Keckhut3 
1 CLA, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Center for Lasers and Applications, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 São Paulo, Brazil
2 LMD-IPSL, Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, France
3 LATMOS-IPSL, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin 11, Boulevard d'Alembert, 78280 Guyancourt, France
The extinction-to-backscatter ratio (also called lidar ratio-LR) is an important parameter which provides information on the transmission and reflection properties of cirrus clouds and also on the ice crystal properties due to their dependence on the particle shape, size and orientation for the particles. In this study is showed an innovative method to obtain theLR for each cloud layer through iterative processes, applying a numerical routine developed at the Center for Lasers and Applications (CLA/IPEN-Brazil) in cooperation with the Laboratoire Amosphères, Milieus, Observations Spatiales, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace/Versailles-Saint Quentin University (LATMOS/IPSL-France). The resulting LR values were obtained based on measurements of the MSP (Metropolitan City of São Paulo) - lidar system, performed on 11th June 2007, comprehending 298 minutes separated in 7 distinct so called stationary periods. For the first four periods, was observed two distinct layers of clouds with LR values varying between 28±15 and 35 ± 18 sr for the first layer and 37±11srand 74±14 sr for the second, indicating the presence of both small and large ice crystals composed by solid and hollow columns in majority. The last 3 periods of measurements in turn presented a monolayer cloud with LR about 19±04 sr, what corresponds to a relatively small solid needles, plates and column crystals.
S3P-32
SEASONAL EVOLUTION OF CIRRUS CLOUDS OVER NORTHWEST OF IRAN
Ruhollah Moradhaseli, Hadi Borzouei, Hamid Reza Khalesifard
Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Iran
We have designed and fabricated a depolarization lidar in the Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS) in Zanjan, Iran. The IASBS remote sensing group has been using this lidar since late 2010. Study of clouds, especially high altitude cirrus clouds is one of goals of the group. In this work, statistical study of clouds over Zanjan i.e. their altitude and temporal occurrence is reported using lidar and MODIS cirrus reflectance (CCR) data. The results show a regular variation of CCR during a year over Zanjan.
S3P-33
SYNERGETIC INFRASTRUCTURE FOR TRACE GAS AND AEROSOL MEASUREMENTS AND CHARACTERIZATION AT THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS AND THE NATIONAL OBSERVATORY OF ATHENS, GREECE
Alexandros Papayannis1, Panayotis Kokkalis1, Rodelise Mamouri1, Vassilis Amiridis2, Emmanouella Remoundaki3, Georgios Tsaknakis1, Stylianos Kazadzis4, Alexandra Tsekeri2, Eleni Marinou2
1National Technical University of Athens, Laser Remote Sensing Unit, Physics Department, Zografou, Greece
2National Observatory of Athens, Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing, Greece
3National Technical University of Athens, School of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Zografou, Greece
4National Observatory of Athens, Institute for Environmental Research and Sustainable Development, Greece
Atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in Earth’sradiation budget, both in a direct way (absorption and scattering) and an indirect way (formation and lifetime of clouds). Therefore, experimental data on aerosoloptical, microphysical and chemical properties arestrongly needed as input parameters for global climate models, which assess the role of aerosols in scenarios of Global Change. This is especially true for the Eastern Mediterranean area, which is the most vulnerable region in future climate change scenarios. We present the synergetic infrastructure available in the Greater Athens Area (GAA), dedicated to trace gas and aerosol measurements and characterization monitoring at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) and the National Observatory of Athens (NOA). This infrastructure is composed of ground-based and in-situ passive and active instrumentation coupled with space-borne active-passive sensors. Finally, a case study analysis of Saharan dust followed by our synergetic instrumentation is presented and analyzed.
S3P-34
AEROSOL OPTICAL PROPERTIES STUDIED IN COASTAL AREAS WITH USE OF REMOTE TECHNIQUES
Tymon Zielinski1, Tomasz Petelski1, PrzemysBaw Makuch1, Agata Strzalkowska1, Agnieszka Ponczkowska1, Marcin Wichorowski21 Krzysztof Markowicz2, Giorgos Chourdakis3, Giorgos Georgoussis3
1Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Science, Poland
2Institute of Geophysics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Poland
3Raymetrics S.A., 12 Papathanasiou str., 19002 Paiania, Athens, Greece
This paper presents the results of the studies of aerosol optical properties measured using lidars and sun photometers. We describe two case studies of the combined measurements made in two coastal zones, in Crete in 2006 and on the Baltic Sea in 2009. The combination of lidars and sun photometers provides comprehensive information on the total aerosol optical thickness in the entire atmosphere as well as the vertical structure of aerosol optical properties. Once we get such information and combine them with air mass back-trajectories and data collected at stations located on the route of air masses then we obtain a complete picture of the aerosol variations both vertically and horizontally. We show that such combined studies are especially important in the coastal areas where depending on air mass advection directions and altitudes the influence of fine or coarse mode (in this case possibly sea-salt) particles on the vertical structure of aerosol optical properties is an important issue.
S3P-35
AEROSOL OPTICAL MODELING FOR REMOTE SENSING IN THE COASTAL ATMOSPHERE SURFACE LAYER
Gennady Kaloshin
V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, 1, Academician Zuev sq.,634021, Tomsk, Russia
The microphysical model MaexPro for the surface layer marine and coastal atmospheric aerosols that is based on the long-term observations of size distributions for 0.01 - 100 µm particles is presented. The fundamental feature of the model is a parameterization of amplitudes and widths for aerosol modes of the aerosol size distribution function (ASDF) as functions of the fetch and the wind speed. The shape of ASDF and its dependence on meteorological parameters, altitudes above the sea level (H), fetch (X), wind speed (U) and relative humidity (RH) is investigated. The spectral profiles of the aerosol extinction coefficients calculated by MaexPro (Marine Aerosol Extinction Profiles) are in good agreement with observational data and the numerical results obtained by well-known NAN and ANAM codes. Moreover, MaexPro was found to be accurate and reliable instrument for investigation of the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols.
S3P-36
THE SYNERGY OF EARLINET AND AERONET OBSERVATIONS FOR OCEAN COLOR RETRIEVALS
Giannakaki Elina1,2, Müller Detlef3,4,5, Mattis Ina3,6, Krüger Olaf7, Brockmann Carsten7, Thom Vi Thi Huong4, Ewa Kwiatkowska8
1Finish Meteorological Institute, Kuopio Unit, Kuopio, FI-70211, Finland
2Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
3 Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Germany
4 Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Korea
5now at: Science and Systems Applications, Inc. NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA, USA
6German Meteorological Service, Germany
7Brockmann Consult GmbH, 21502 Geesthacht, Germany
8EUMETSAT, D-64295 Darmstadt, German
A new vertically resolved aerosol models for Europe has been developed with the synergy of AERONET and EARLINET data in the frame of the VRAME project. EARLINET is the first coordinated aerosol lidar network, established in 2000, with the main goal to provide a comprehensive, quantitative, and statistically significant database for the aerosol distribution on a continental scale. AERONET is a federation of ground-based remote sensing aerosol networks. The basic instrument is a CIMEL sun-/sky-photometer.  Both networks aim at providing aerosol information, whereby two different types of instruments, namely lidar and sunphotometer, are used and provide different types of measurements and different information content. VRAME stands for “Vertically Resolved Aerosol Model for Europe from a Synergy of EARLINET and AERONET data”. The new model describes the vertical distribution of different, non-maritime aerosol types over Europe as well as their characteristic optical properties. In this paper we describe the methodology which is followed in order to obtain vertically resolved optical and microphysical properties of the models from the synergy of EARLINET (vertical profiles) and AERONET (column integrated) data.
S3P-37
SYNCHRONIZED STARPHOTOMETRY AND LIDAR MEASUREMENTS IN
THE HIGH ARCTIC
Konstantin Baibakov1,2,3, Norman O'Neill1, Liviu Ivanescu1, Chris Perro4, Christoph Ritter5, Andreas Herber6, Tom Duck4, Karl-Heinz Schulz7, Otto Schrems3,6
1 Centre d’Applications et de Recherches en Télédétection, Sherbrooke University, Sherbrooke, Canada
2 Global Environmental and Climate Change Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
3Department of Chemistry, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
4Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
5Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany
6 Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany
The sunphotometry-lidar synergy has proven to be effective for the characterization of aerosol events in the High Arctic. Sunphotometry measurements, however, are limited to the day-time periods.  Starphotometry, based on the extinction of bright-star radiation, can mitigate the lack of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements during the Polar Night. In this work we present several examples of the coincident starphotometry-lidar measurements at Eureka, Canada (79°59’N, 85°56’W) obtained in Feb-Mar 2011. We show a correlation between fine (sub-micron) and coarse (super-micron) mode AOD dynamics from starphotometry and the backscatter profiles and depolarization ratio values from the lidar data.
S3P-38
EVALUATION OF FINE MODE LIDAR CONCENTRATION RETRIEVALS USING AIRBORNE IN-SITU MEASUREMENTS
Panayotis Kokkalis1, Alexandros Papayannis1, Vassilis Amiridis2, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri1,3,
Anatoli Chaikovsky4, Oleg Dubovik5, Alexandra Tsekeri2

1National Technical University of Athens, Laser Remote Sensing Unit, Physics Department, Zografou, Greece
2National Observatory of Athens, Palaia Penteli, Greece
3Department of Civil Engineering and Geomatics, Cyprus Technical University, Lemesos, Cyprus
4Institute of Physics of the National Academy of Science of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus
5LOA, Universite de Lille, Lille, France
The potential of retrieving aerosol concentration profiles using multi-wavelength lidar measurements and coincident sunphotometric data is evaluated in this study. An advanced algorithm is used for a case study over Athens where airborne chemical composition vertical profile was available. Airborne in-situ data show good performance of the algorithm under study regarding the concentration retrievals. Spatial aerosol distribution within the area where the airborne data were averaged could lead to the observed discrepancies at lower troposphere. However, free tropospheric profiles revealed an excellent agreement.
S3P-39
EVALUATION OF DUST MODELLING USING A SYNERGETIC ALGORITHM OF LIDAR AND SUNPHOTOMETER DATA

Alexandra Tsekeri1, Vassilis Amiridis1, Panayotis Kokkalis2, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri2,3, Alexandros Papayannis2, Sarah Basart4,5, Anatoli Chaikovsky6, Oleg Dubovik7, and JoséMaria Baldasano4

1Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, Athens, Greece
2Laboratory of Lasers and Applications, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece
3Department of Civil Engineering and Geomatics, Cyprus Technical University, Lemesos, Cyprus
4Barcelona Supercomputing Center-Centro Nacional de Supercomputation (BSC-CNS), Earth Sciences Department, Barcelona, Spain
5Environmental Modelling Laboratory, Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain
6Institute of Physics of the National Academy of Science of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus
7LOA, Universite de Lille, Lille, France
We present a case study of a vertically extended dust event over Athens, Greece, on July 20, 2011. Dust concentration and extinction coefficient profiles, modelled from the Dust Regional Atmospheric Modeling (BSC-DREAM8b) system, are compared with retrieved concentration and extinction coefficient profiles from multi-wavelength backscatter and depolarization lidar measurements, combined with the column-averaged microphysical properties of dust from sunphotometer data. Our analysis highlights the importance of the depolarization lidar measurements for the success of the retrieval, due to its sensitivity to the non-spherical shape of dust particles. We find that BSC-DREAM8b captures the dust event fairly well in terms of the modeled concentrations, but seems to underestimate the dust extinction coefficient profile at 550 nm. We consider this result as a first step towards a more complete validation of the model, especially for its dust extinction coefficient profile product.
S3P-40
ENHANCEMENT FACTORS AT ISPRA EMEP-GAW STATION
Mariana Adam1,2, Jean-Philippe Putaud1, Sebastiao Martins dos Santos1,
Alessandro Dell’Acqua1 and Carsten Gruening1

1European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Ispra, 21027, Italy
2Curently: no affiliation,  HYPERLINK "mailto:adammariana@gmail.com" adammariana@gmail.com
This study focuses on the aerosol hygroscopic properties as determined from ground-based measurements and Mie theory. The dependence of the various aerosol optical properties (aerosol absorption, scattering, backscattering or extinction coefficients) onrelative humidity has to be established in order to determine their values in ambient conditions, where relative humidity can reach high values. The effect ofthe particle hygroscopic growth on the aerosol opticalproperties was computed using the Mie theory, based on data obtained from a series of instruments running atour station. We found median enhancement factors(defined as ratios between the values of optical variables at 90 % and 0 % relative humidity) equal to 1.1, 2.1, 1.7, and 1.8, for the aerosol absorption, scattering, backscattering, and extinction coefficients, respectively. All except the absorption enhancement factors show a strong correlation with the hygroscopic growth factor.
S3P-41
THE EOLE LIDAR SYSTEM OF THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS
Panayotis Kokkalis1, Alexandros Papayannis1, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri1, Georgios Tsaknakis1 and Vassilis Amiridis2
1National Technical University of Athens, Laser Remote Sensing Unit, Physics Department, Zografou, Greece
2National Observatory of Athens, Greece
The technical specifications and advances of the EOLE lidar located in the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) are presented in this paper. EOLE is a multi-wavelength combined backscatter/Raman lidar which is part of the EARLINET lidar network fromMay 2000. The system has been upgraded and relocated on April 2010. The latest system configuration is analyzed here.
S3P-42
AEROSOL CLASSIFICATION USING AIRBORNE HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR MEASUREMENTS
Silke Groß1, Martin Wirth1, Michael Esselborn1,*
1Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut für Physik der Atmosphäre, Münchner Str. 20, 82234 Weßling, Germany
*now: European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching, Germany
We present an aerosol classification based on high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) measurements. Intensive aerosol properties measured with the HSRL system are used to differentiate between different aerosol types, characterized by coordinated HSRL and in-situ measurements. Backward trajectories are used to identify possible source regions of the different aerosol types.
S3P-43
SMOKE AND DUST PLUME OBSERVATIONS BY A MIE-RAMAN LIDAR, SUNPHOTOMETER AND SATELLITE IN THE NORTHEAST US
Barry Gross, Lina Cordero, Yonghua Wu, Fred Moshary, and Sam Ahmed
Optical Remote Sensing Lab & NOAA-CREST, City College of New York, NY, 10031,  HYPERLINK "mailto:USA.*gross@ccny.cuny.edu" USA
In this presentation, we analyze the smoke and dust plumes optical characteristics and long-distance transport with a ground-based multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar, sunphotometer and satellite observations in New York City (NYC, 40.821ºN, 73.949ºW). Vertical profiles of aerosol plume extinction coefficients and ångstrom exponents are derived from the combination of multi-wavelength lidar and sunphotometer measurements. Aloft smoke plumes from Idaho/Montana forest fires were measured at 2~8 km altitude on August 14~15, 2007 with aerosol optical depths (AOD) of 0.6~0.8 at 500 nm and high Angstrom exponents (~1.8). On Mar.19, 2010, the aloft Asian-dust plumes appeared at 3~9 km altitude with the small ångstrom exponent ('P'~'ª'Ã'Ð'í'!("(J([(òâÓÇÓ»ÓâÓ°¨°°ÓââÓâÓâӄӄÓp\MhqYh=#OJQJmH
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gd"c§Wolfram, E.A. 145, 145, 146
Wu, C. 65
Wu, D. 85, 136
Wu, S. 34
Wu, Y. 102, 116, 152
Wuebbles, D.J. 68
Wulfmeyer, V. 33, 46, 46, 46,
135, 138, 138
Xia, H. 54
Xie, C. 85
Xin, F. 55
Xu, J. 157
Xu, Z. 135
Xue, Z. 54
Xueying, W. 127
Yabuki, M. 94
Yakshin, M. 115
Yan, Z. 56, 150
Yang, G. 157
Yang, T. 84
Yang, Y. 147
Yasui, M. 31
Yela, M. 142, 142
Yongchao, Z. 45
Young, S. 125
Yu, H. 135
Yu, J. 31, 56
Yu, Z. 144, 147, 158
Yuan, K. 135
Yuan, T. 149
Yuliang, T. 45
Zamorano, B. 146
Zamorano, F. 111, 145
Zaratti, F. 39
Zawadzka, O. 140
Zhai, P. 79
Zhang, J. 42, 83
Zhang, K. 118
Zhang, W. 34
Zhang, X. 157
Zhao, P. 135
Zharkov, V.I. 56, 61
Zhong, Z. 96
Zhou, H. 42, 86
Zhou, J. 85, 96, 136
Zhu, Q. 143
Zhu, X. 55
Zhu, X. 55
Zielinska, A.J. 104
Zielinski, T. 98, 140

Note: Boldface page numbers indicate first author.








Program & Abstracts 26th ILRC

International Laser Radar Conference, 25-29 June 2012, Porto Heli, Greece 

 Program & Abstracts 26th ILRC

International Laser Radar Conference, 25-29 June 2012, Porto Heli, Greece  PAGE \* MERGEFORMAT ix



 PAGE \* MERGEFORMAT xi International Laser Radar Conference, 25-29 June 2012, Porto Heli, Greece

General Program Program & Abstracts 26th ILRC

International Laser Radar Conference, 25-29 June 2012, Porto Heli, Greece  PAGE \* MERGEFORMAT 31

 Program & Abstracts 26th ILRC

 Program & Abstracts 26th ILRC

 Program & Abstracts 26th ILRC

 Program & Abstracts 26th ILRC

 Program & Abstracts 26th ILRC

 Program & Abstracts 26th ILRC

 Program & Abstracts 26th ILRC